Posts Tagged ‘Student Life’

When Campus Food Doesn’t Cut It

Wednesday, June 12th, 2024

Picture this: it’s a Sunday afternoon. Your stomach is grumbling. Your head is spinning. You ask yourself: “Where am I going to get my next meal?” You sift through your mental Rolodex of campus food options and your heart and stomach sink in sickening tandem. You, anguished student, come to a conclusion: “I don’t want any of this.”

As students confined to greasy or undercooked campus food, we must explore the options of buying and cooking your own food. We must venture outside the iron gates to a local grocery store!

There are three things to take into consideration when choosing where to shop: price, location, and food quality. The first, and arguably most important, is price. Most of us students can’t break the bank whenever we’re craving some non-campus food, especially those living in New York City. When everything inexplicably costs $30, affordable options are a must. The second is location. While we all would like to think we’re able to lug a heavy bag of groceries a mile home, we should be careful not to get caught in our own hubris. The third is food quality. Being cognizant of the freshness of the food you buy might save you a bout of stomach trouble!

For this chapter, I’ve asked my friends, roommates, and fellow grocery-shoppers on a student’s budget: where should I buy my groceries?

The most popular choice is Modern Market, at 2385 Arthur Ave. Modern Market is my personal favorite for its fresh produce and convenient location. While it’s on the more expensive side, I’m a firm believer that sometimes it’s worth it to splurge on quality fall fruits, spring veggies, winter legumes, etc.

Modern Market is situated between 186th and 187th in a particularly lush block of Arthur Ave.
Image credit: yelp.com

Those who recommended Fine Fare on 2645 Webster Ave do so most emphatically. Boasting low prices and wide aisles, Fine Fare fans insist that this fine establishment is worth the walk to the other side of the Metro North train tracks. On a personal note, my roommates shop at Fine Fare, and while they return from grocery shopping panting, sweating, and sore, they are never complaining.

Fine Fare has that nostalgic feel that’s worth the walk.
Image credit: marketreportblog.com

If you’re interested in a Fordham-specific option, the Arthur Avenue retail market is definitely the most expensive (costing an AARM and a leg! haha), but has probably the best quality groceries and fresh food available in the immediate area. There are over a dozen vendors peddling their specialties, including but not limited to: fresh fruit, cured meats, coffee, and even cigars! However, given this odd assortment of available goods, I’d argue that the retail market is more of a touristy experience than a reliable grocery spot.

The Arthur Ave retail market really feels like a whole other world.
Image credit: edc.nyc

A final option: getting groceries delivered from Aldi. Some people I know swear by this, saying that it’s affordable, convenient, and good for resisting temptation to buy junk food because you don’t physically see it. If you’re on a specific diet, or if you’re just trying to steer yourself away from Ben & Jerry’s or Tostitos Hint of Lime chips (not speaking from experience or anything), this is a good option. 

However, in the spirit of engaging with one’s community, I can’t in good faith recommend that you ONLY order groceries online from a large chain! It’s important to support local businesses like the ones I mentioned before. Get out there and talk to people—recluses don’t have any fun. So buy your own groceries, like a grown-up!

For a special student discount on groceries near you, check out Uptown Whole Foods!

by Mia Crocco

Mia is a rising junior at Fordham University – Rose Hill studying English and theology. In her free time, Mia enjoys cooking, collaging, and playing the piano and guitar.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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It’s Popular Because It’s Good: Belmont Staples

Wednesday, June 5th, 2024

The Bronx’s Belmont is a neighborhood with myriad cultures, which means its food options are not only incredibly diverse but incredibly delicious. Patrons of the neighborhood are able to enjoy recipes that have been refined for decades, and taste like it too! Students in the area have a couple staple spots, consistently adored and attended for being delicious, reliable, and mostly affordable. Located in the heart of the Bronx’s Little Italy, all of the below staples specialize in Italian fare: specifically pasta, fish, cheese, and meat. However, in this chapter, we’re going to be getting the obvious choices out of the way: are the restaurants students frequent really worth your time?

First off is Enzo’s: THE staple restaurant. Packed with families during Parents’ Weekend, move-in, move-out, Homecoming, and more. Any time parents are in town, their kids (students starved for quality food, unable to justify dropping thirty precious dollars on pasta) beg for Enzo’s. Or at least I definitely do. Their menu boasts pizza, seafood, meat entrees, salads, incredible pasta and sauce, and delicious desserts. Some of my favorite dishes include their Pizza alla Enzo, complete with prosciutto and arugula (one of my favorite combinations), and anything with their signature vodka sauce. Their sauces are so delicious, Enzo’s has blessed the community by making jars of it available to purchase by the door. The southernmost of these staples and thus the farthest from campus, Enzo’s of Arthur Avenue is definitely worth the walk.

Though only opened in 1999, Enzo’s of Arthur Avenue seems like it’s been perfecting its recipes for decades.
Image credit: facebook.com

Next is Michaelangelo’s: Known for its faux-outdoor back patio and Thursday happy hour, Michaelangelo’s is the spot for formals. Though these events can get pricey, it’s almost always worth it. What could be considered a sit-down restaurant by day transforms into an Italian bar-and-grill, complete with music, dancing, and of-age alumni looking for a nostalgic dinner option in their old stomping grounds. One of Arthur Ave’s more affordable Italian restaurants, the food is alright, the drinks are alright, but the fun ambience (namely the 2000s music, lively staff, and the soft lights strung through the entire patio) is what makes Michaelangelo’s a favorite for all students, for all four years. 

Michaelangelo’s jungle-style back patio is the perfect environment to enjoy some affordable Italian food.
Image credit: yelp.com

If you’re feeling a little less formal when you visit Belmont, you can opt for Casa Della Mozzarella on 187th St. Deli on the outside, life-changing sandwich experience on the inside. Casa Della Mozzarella specializes in some of the most divine Italian paninis to ever grace human tastebuds: can’t go wrong with Il Classico, a caprese panini. They also sell standalone cheese and cured meats as well, and as their name would suggest, their mozzarella trumps all on Arthur Avenue.

While Casa Della Mozzarella might seem cramped on the inside, it’s only because it’s got so much to offer: cheese, meat, paninis, you name it!
Image credit: usarestaurants.info

Finally, Pugsley’s Pizza: What looks like a divey pizza spot tucked into a parking lot on 191st Street is an undeniable Fordham institution. Decades of names scrawled on the walls, faded photos with celebrities, and worn seats that were probably once very clean and comfortable all lend themselves to the pizza staple’s slogan: Love is It. While Pugsley’s might not be objectively the best pizza in Belmont, when you walk through that green door, you’re awash with the scent of garlic and the feeling of home.

Armed with armchairs, booths, and a large family-style table, Pugsley’s is the go-to spot for a bit to eat after a late night excursion with friends.
Image credit: usarestaurants.info
If you want to get all done up to go out for a fancy dinner at Pugsley’s, take the D Train to W 90th St for a discounted ‘do!

by Mia Crocco

Mia is a rising junior at Fordham University – Rose Hill studying English and theology. In her free time, Mia enjoys cooking, collaging, and playing the piano and guitar.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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On The Fordham Bubble

Wednesday, June 5th, 2024

Nestled comfortably into the center of the Bronx exists a tree-lined oasis, cut off from the rest of the world. A place where those inside get to enjoy the sounds of birds and church bells instead of cars honking. A place populated by spoiled college students, most of which are unwilling to venture outside its imposing iron gates. This place is none other than Fordham University’s Rose Hill campus.

I’ve been lucky to be a student at Fordham for the past two years, where I’ve been able to take advantage of its beautiful campus and vibrant student life: a plethora of clubs spanning the arts, administration, publishing, academics, and more. There’s plenty to do on campus; I will commend the university for that. However, it would be a disservice to remain behind campus gates. Nicknamed “the Fordham Bubble,” the phenomena causes many students to pathologically stay inside Fordham’s campus, and if they do leave, limit themselves into Lower Manhattan rather than exploring the city. Contrary to the beliefs of many Fordham students, not all of New York is like SoHo or Bushwick or Astoria, neighborhoods frequented by young people in similar demographics to Fordham students: namely, people “escaping” suburbia to enjoy the fast-paced life of the city.

More specifically, Fordham is located in the Belmont neighborhood of the Bronx. Whenever I tell someone I go to school in the Bronx, I usually get this response (especially from older people): “The Bronx is very dangerous. You should really be careful.” Not only is this phrase insulting, it’s also extremely diminutive and completely disregards the diversity of neighborhoods throughout New York City. Even so, while some neighborhoods in the Bronx may be considered “rough” by outsiders, such is not the case for the majority of the Bronx, least of all Belmont. In fact, the area is populated mostly by families because of the many schools nearby: MS 45, PS 74, Theodore Roosevelt High School, and more. A building on Fordham Road even houses 6 specialized schools!

As such, I believe that Fordham’s location in Belmont provides the perfect introduction to New York City. Belmont is home to large Dominican, Italian, and Albanian populations, which allows for incredible food options. Arthur Avenue, arguably the crown jewel of Belmont and the self-professed “real Little Italy,” packs a whopping 29 restaurants into 4 blocks. And that’s not even counting the restaurants on the cross streets! Each restaurant offers a unique experience, even if they’re offering similar food. While many Fordham students do take advantage of community staples like Enzo’s, many businesses in the Bronx don’t get enough love from the students who spend four years adjacent to them. This is why it’s necessary to “pop the Fordham bubble”: expanding our palettes in more ways than one is an excellent way to support local businesses and to engage with our community in a meaningful way, rather than just existing alongside it.

For Fordham students, the D’s Fordham Road station is a community staple as much as any local restaurant.
Image Credit: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/45036064995610335/

In this series, we’ll attack this problem, offering the means to pop the “Fordham bubble” by bringing attention to restaurants, parks, markets, and events that show what not only Belmont but the entire Bronx has to offer. We’re going to learn from the best by dialoguing with members of the Belmont community and hearing about their favorite things to do in the place they call home. We’re going to do a deep-dive into what Arthur Ave is famous for, and we’re going to explore some places that should be famous, too. Belmont is one of my favorite neighborhoods in all of New York because of its ability to offer a bite-sized portion of city life while still maintaining the feeling of a tight-knit community. Without the exhausting hustle-and-bustle of Manhattan, without the finance bros clogging the subways, without the influencers taking selfies in the middle of the street, one can truly appreciate what is, in my opinion, is the most underrated borough in New York City: the Bronx.

Get off campus for a bit and head uptown for delicious hot pot at XW Spicy Hot Pot!

In short, one not only needs to step outside of their comfort zone, they need to reassess the reasons for said comfort zone. This goes for any college student living in an urban area that furrows the brows of their close-minded friends and family: the city is what you make of it, and you’ll never find your new favorite spot if you don’t pop the bubble!


by Mia Crocco

Mia is a rising junior at Fordham University – Rose Hill studying English and theology. In her free time, Mia enjoys cooking, collaging, and playing the piano and guitar.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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On Finding Balance

Thursday, March 21st, 2024
Sitting outside after class in the spring

Experiencing college life forces students to reassess their priorities and what they choose to spend their energy on. There is a newfound independence to this lifestyle, with hopes of meeting academic and personal goals, but there is also a large amount of uncertainty that comes with change. In this new stage in life, finding balance is the key to reaching your milestones. By doing so, it will be easier to focus on what we need to do or want to do in the moment, staying present without worries about the future or past.

The definition of what a balanced lifestyle means varies from individual. It comes with an understanding of one’s priorities and values and what truly makes them happy. It may take the form of limiting iPhone screen time to 1-2 hours a day, reading for 15 minutes before bed, or grabbing lunch with your friends at an off-campus restaurant. Whatever the form may take, there are always trade-offs with tasks that may seem burdensome or necessary to complete, such as that one problem set you’ve been pushing off that’s due at the end of the week or last week’s laundry and cleaning. Counteracting the feelings of stress and anxiety with activities that make you calm, joyous, and energized is the end result of a balanced lifestyle.

Going out to lunch with friends at a restaurant near campus

A balanced lifestyle for me means giving myself moments of calm and happiness when life becomes overwhelming. It appears when I’m winding down after a stressful day, chatting with my roommate about what we accomplished during the day, when I have time to work on my passion projects, or when I’m eating dinner with my friends and catching up on our days. When I’m experiencing these moments of being present, I know there will always be some task I need to do, but it is not as pressing as the present. Experiencing these moments will come naturally with time as you let yourself leave behind any stress in the past and focus on your moment. It helps to give yourself kind reminders, understanding where you are now and giving yourself the opportunity to breathe and focus on yourself. 

Knowing when to say no to favors, change in plans, or any other external factors is sometimes difficult. Putting up these boundaries is necessary for shaping your needs and what you need to actively succeed and pursue your goals. Finding balance connects with creating schedules, prioritizing, and learning what suits your individual needs. Sometimes, life happens and you may spend too much time studying for an exam, taking a nap, or working out. Unexpected changes in your schedule may arise, and you cannot fight them. Despite these challenges, remaining flexible and focused on what matters to you will find a way to be successful and balanced for you. 


Relax and treat yourself with this coupon!

By Lecia Sun

Lecia is a student at Tufts University studying Classics and World Literature. When she is not reading, she can be found attempting the New York Times Games, trying out a new creative hobby, and dreaming about her next great bake. 


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Freedom?

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2022

I see the vape go to their lips from across the room. I grit my teeth and turn away, the craving suddenly ripping through me. “You don’t need it,” I think to myself. There’s more than one vape in the dim room, however, and a little alcohol does a lot to break down one’s resolve. I ask the boy next to me what flavor his disposable is. He asks if I have one, presumably to perform a trade of sorts. I admit to him that I quit, that I was two months vape-free. “Seriously? Wow, man.” His words are slurred, but his eyes are wide and focused on me, “That is so impressive. I’m proud of you. It’s not easy to go against the crowd like that.” Though my urge to break is nearly overpowering, his words are reassuring. A mixture of pride and guilt meld together in the pit of my stomach, pooling in the back of my throat. How can one feel so strongly about something but still yearn for the opposite?

I don’t remember if I broke that night or not. It doesn’t really matter.

When I tell people that I’ve quit vaping, they’re usually impressed. I appreciate their congratulations, but the voice in my head telling me that I still want nicotine makes me feel like a fraud. I would feel proud of myself, but then feel silly for turning to someone and asking if I could hit their vape. In March, when I should have been over 3 months nic-free, I was caught in a cycle of going back on my promise to myself, just taking a few hits every few days. I realized after several weeks that I had fallen back into my old routine, my old habit resurfacing. I decided I could no longer allow myself to have cheat days. I knew I was strong enough now to stay away completely, so I had to fully commit to the quit. I remember resetting my timer after over 150 days. I had been lying to myself, and I was done doing that. Now, every time I break my streak, I reset the timer. It’s only fair.

Nights out with friends are fun but draining; it’s hard to be around accessible nicotine and stay away from it.

I still felt alone in quitting. The people who thought it was impressive that I quit were still vaping; they weren’t on my team in this endeavor. The lack of solidarity made it hard to be true to my promise to stay away from nicotine. Luckily, I have a secret weapon. She cheers me on and keeps me on track. She’s not in my same situation because she was never addicted to nicotine. She saw me when I was still vaping but trying to quit, and she was with me when I was fiending like crazy at a party. Someone who will physically hold you and tell the person whose vape you’ve just asked for “NO” for you is something special. Her pride means more than that of those who still vape, because she won’t dangle nicotine in front of my face. We get to stay away from nicotine together.

Sometimes I resent people who vape or smoke. It feels like I’m being teased, as they get their little rush of chemical joy while I sit fiddling with a hair tie or chewing violently on a piece of gum. I almost feel angry, seeing others with the same vice that was once mine. I allow myself to be angry, if only to keep me from asking for a spare cigarette. The solidarity between myself and those who subscribe to bad habits is demolished, because I went through the suffering that is quitting and they haven’t. I tell myself it won’t always be this way, that I’ll be able to be around it someday and not feel rage and jealousy rush to my cheeks. In her article “Neurobiology of Nicotine Dependence,” Athina Markou states, “Nicotine dependence is more prevalent than dependence on any other substance of abuse (Anthony et al. 1994).” While dependence on nicotine is a prevalent issue, nicotine itself is not the killer when it comes to cigarettes. Vaping bypasses the tobacco and delivers nicotine in chemical juice form to millions of individuals, avoiding the danger. One of those individuals used to be me. Sometimes I ask myself, why did you even quit, really? If it’s not really dangerous, what’s the big deal? If it’s so hard to stay away, then why stay away? It’s just a habit, in reality.

We all have habits.


Gelato and espresso are both good solutions to frustrations that can stem from transforming habits, and discounts reduce frustrations even further! (source: trust me!) Check out Ferrara with this coupon and your student I.D. to receive 20% off!

Sophie Rounds is a rising junior at Loyola University Chicago, double majoring in creative writing and Spanish. She loves to read and wishes she were a better cook. When she is not reading or writing, she enjoys singing in several choirs at her university and thrifting with her friends.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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The Decision

Wednesday, July 13th, 2022

“I just had a rather unproductive day… I’ve mostly watched tiktok/youtube and waited for the nic to wear off of my system so I could get a dizzy. That’s actually why I sat down to write. I want so badly to be absolutely done with nicotine. I’m going to write a pros and cons list:

“I knew the list would turn out that way, but I just needed to see it on paper. I am DONE after the one I have runs out. D-O-N-E.”

-Journal entry, 9/18/21

The above excerpt is taken from a journal page written on an auspicious night during my sophomore year of college. I had been vaping for nearly a year. That night was my point of no return, my hard stop, my first act closing number going into intermission. My decision was fierce and solid. I was DONE.

Of course, I didn’t quit cold turkey. Quitting nicotine is hard. Mistakes were made and cravings were given into. That night, however, changed my mindset and my path. Previously, I hadn’t held the conviction to get rid of the vice of nicotine. The pros and cons list existed only in my mind. I shoved it to the back, hid it with concerns about my future and that one song that constantly runs on repeat underneath all brain activity. I didn’t allow it to come to the forefront and confront me with the obviousness of the choice. It was out of focus, blurry.

Everything came together on September 18th. It felt like sliding my glasses on for the first time, the blurriness of the unofficial list suddenly sharply clear. My pen was unstoppable. The pros and cons spilled onto the page, and a page of craving busters followed soon after. I made a plan, and I provided myself with resources that would help me through. I scribbled a list of advice from online sources: avoid alcohol, exercise, drink lots of water, rest, stay positive, do NOT give in to cravings. I even wrote a letter for myself, for moments of weakness when I would look back and ask why am I doing this to myself? The words I wrote that night still inspire me to this day, seeing how scared yet determined I had been.

This poster hangs over my desk and has since September 2021.

My conviction wasn’t the only thing that pushed me over the edge. I thought about my grandma, who had passed away in August from lung related complications. I thought about my mom, looking at me in disappointment and concern upon finding a stash of my empty vapes. I thought about my friends, the people I’ve chosen to love and support endlessly, addicted to this harmful substance alongside me. All of it together pushed tears out of my eyes as I wrote and wrote and wrote. I was done.

A ScienceDirect article entitled “Quitting e-cigarettes: Quit attempts and quit intentions among youth and young adults,” details research on how young e-cigarette users feel about quitting vaping, saying, “…33.3% reported a past-year quit attempt, 15.3% reported serious intentions to quit, and 54.2% reported general intentions to quit.”  Half of all young e-cigarette users have intentions to quit using nicotine. Many, however, make an attempt and subsequently fall back into their habit. It’s a hard one to break. I wanted to better my odds, to not be part of the third of users who tried to quit but couldn’t make it stick. I downloaded an app soon after the 18th of September: QuitVaping. I texted “DITCHVAPE” to the This is Quitting number by the truth initiative. I was ready to embark on this treacherous journey in order to free myself, and eventually my friends, from nicotine’s iron clutches.

“Gaslight, gatekeep, girlboss, get rid of nicotine,” were the final words of my journal entry on September 18th. Words I decided to live by.


Looking for some coffee and a pastry? Get 20% off with this coupon and your student I.D. at La Columbe! Whether it’s distracting you from a nicotine addiction or simply helping you stay awake, discounted coffee is always a great choice:)

By Sophie Rounds

Sophie Rounds is a rising junior at Loyola University Chicago, double majoring in creative writing and Spanish. She loves to read and wishes she were a better cook. When she is not reading or writing, she enjoys singing in several choirs at her university and thrifting with her friends.



For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Living in Moments of History

Tuesday, July 12th, 2022

College is a time for a person to grow and reflect. I suppose that is why they call it “higher education,” since in four years, the goal is for you to leave school as a better version of yourself, and ideally, a better human being. You’re not just concerned about landing a career (sorry mom and dad), but you are trying to learn about the world around you and your place within it. It’s a turbulent time in a young person’s life, and when you mix that with a global pandemic that ushers in a time of increased isolation and awareness of current events, it prompts more learning, thinking, and reflecting than ever before.

During one of my Zoom classes in the Spring 2020 semester, my professor declared that we were all “living in history” as we were all exiting the meeting. It took me by surprise, for despite being such a short sentence, the truth of it resonated deeply with me. We were, seemingly, entering a new era of human life. Students read about things like the Black Death or the flu outbreak and thought “this could never happen to us,” yet there we were, dinosaurs with no warning of the impending asteroid. It seemed like, similar to some of our favorite apocalyptic stories, a worldwide catastrophe would connect all of us. Like the cast of High School Musical might say, we would be all in this together.

Spoiler alert! We were not. What was supposed to unite us—a common enemy in the form of a viral disease—was a topic of contention, especially as alt-right groups were fear-mongering to spread misinformation about the vaccine and calling COVID-19 a hoax.

Image credit: https://mississippitoday.org/2020/12/16/marshall-ramsey-vaccination/

But this was only the beginning, and the pandemic was not the only moment of history that we were living through. COVID-19, as many before me have pointed out, brought with it a social reckoning, one that opened many eyes—namely white Americans who did not understand the reality of the privilege they possess—to how corrupt our country truly is. The pandemic has been described as removing distractions from our lives, and it became a time to be engaged and plugged in, critiquing our society and the institutional systems of oppression that were always present but greatly exacerbated by COVID-19.

So much has happened over the last couple of years that it doesn’t do it justice in just one short piece of writing. Beginning with the murder of George Floyd on May 25, 2020, systemic racism and police brutality were once again brought to the forefront of the minds of all Americans. We saw how unfair policing practices like no knock warrants took the lives of Breonna Taylor and Amir Locke. We lived through a dangerously heated presidential election—the first I ever voted in—and though the election of Joe Biden seemed to bring about a shift in the tide, the insurrection on January 6th demonstrated just how fundamentally divided and disappointing our country is. Guns have more rights than any person in this country, as there are always more mass shootings in the United States than there are days in the year (330 at the beginning of the day, 332 when I refreshed the data before posting). LGBTQ+ individuals are being targeted with dangerous legislation like the “Don’t Say Gay” bill in Florida, which open the doors to the erasure and silencing of those who identify with the community. Most recently, those in this country who can get pregnant were stripped of their reproductive rights as Roe v. Wade was overturned—a decision made by only five people, but jeopardizes the lives of all Americans seeking abortions and disproportionately affects marginalized communities. More than that, Justice Clarence Thomas is looking to overturn other important cases such as Griswold v. Connecticut, Lawrence v. Texas, and Obergefell v. Hodges, which targets legislation that, respectively, guarantees the right to contraceptives, same-sex sexual relationships, and same-sex marriage. It feels like we are not only living in moments of history, but we are being sent back to the past and making the same mistakes over again.

If there is anything that I have learned from all of this, it is the importance of paying attention and having conversations driven by human empathy. The pandemic in general showed us that we need to be kind to one another and help each other out when we can, but it also highlighted the inequity our nation operates on and exploits. In a conversation with Dr. Mary Mullen, an English professor at Villanova last year, she astutely pointed out that college campuses like to think they operate in a bubble, one that merely spectates the history of the world around it; but they do not. They are shaping and being shaped by outside forces, and at such a critical moment in our lives when we are trying to figure out who we want to be and come to terms with our own identity, we need to be willing to learn and to listen, especially with all that is going on in our world right now. It’s important to take classes that you are interested in and push you to grow and reflect on yourself—what you think about the world and why. To look at perspectives that reach beyond your own, to remember that humanity can only be at its best when we accept and learn from one another. To include everyone who is left out of the conversation and to remember the stories that are conveniently left out of the K-12 school system.

It feels like the closest this nation has been to unity was in 2019 when we all promised not to post any spoilers for Avengers Endgame. How nice it would be for us to care about each other in the same way again.   

Tough transition, but if you are ever in need of some escapism and fun, be sure to use this coupon for Balance Patch and play some video games!

By: Katie Reed

Katie Reed is a senior at Villanova University studying English and Communication. She is in utter disbelief that she just admitted to being a senior. She loves to read, but has made barely a dent in the increasingly large pile of books on her bookshelf that she told herself she would read this summer. She hopes to enter a career in the editing and publishing industry.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services. At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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The Dizzy

Saturday, June 18th, 2022

I breathe in the rush of chemicals, their harshness hitting the back of my throat in an almost nauseating gasp of relief. Another pull and the feeling begins, somewhere in my esophagus at first. The vibrating sensation spreads into my chest and limbs, then my arms and fingers, extending to my legs and toes. A chill washes over me, and I bring the device back to my lips, craving more of this feeling. Again, the vapor spills into my lungs, making my throat squeeze but allowing the rest of my body to relax. My vision is different as I try to continue reading the post on my glowing phone screen, and I realize that my eyes are shaking. I put the phone down and watch my ceiling, eyes unfocused. A final hit, and I sigh, a euphoria of sorts settling over me as I lean back against my bed, fully appreciating the morning “dizzy.”

Most would call it a buzz, but since the day I tried my friend’s vape, I have referred to the experience as the “dizzy.” Having watched the USB-like piece become a permanent fixture in their hand over the course of several months, I asked them what it felt like. I was curious; it seemed like something they enjoyed, plus they could make cool shapes with the smoke. I had the urge to try it. I asked if they would let me. It was in my hand within a second.

Photo taken during the week of my discovery of the “dizzy.” A time of brightness, the feel of a ray of sun.

That first try was exciting, but it wasn’t what I had expected. The vapor made my throat ache and close, and I think I coughed quite a bit. But, after a moment of catching my breath and some coaching from my friend, I tried again. And again. The vapor was harsh and didn’t taste great, but the world began to swirl around me as the vibrations spread through my chest, into my hands and head. I felt like I had just gotten off of the teacups at DisneyWorld or had just twirled myself on a swing at the playground until I couldn’t see straight. 

I think I smiled. I think I laughed. After noting the dizzying effect the device had on me, the experience of hitting a vape was from that point forward referred to as a “dizzy.” 

In that first week or two, I told my friend not to let me hit it while I was driving. I was concerned that the intensity of the “dizzy” would distract me from the road, that my vibrating eyes would keep me from seeing straight. When I wasn’t driving, however, I was able to obtain the lovely “dizzy,” which I was starting to crave more and more often. The feeling was fun, something that I had never experienced before, had found in nothing else. Perhaps it could be compared to riding a roller coaster, with the tumbling of your stomach and the pounding of adrenaline through your veins. The bodily high that makes your heart race and your head swim, your breath shaky but your brain alive.

 I began asking to borrow my friend’s disposable more and more often, until I finally wanted my own. A device I could have at home when my friend wasn’t around to provide the “dizzy.” I found a gas station that didn’t ask for my I.D., and the rest is history.

Once I began vaping nicotine, I saw it everywhere. I hadn’t really thought much about it prior, even though my high school principal had been adamant about keeping students from vaping in the restrooms. Once I had experienced the beauty of the “dizzy,” I not only saw cigarettes and vapes all over, but I also gained new insight into why people have and continue to indulge in what some might call a vice. My judgment of smokers dipped. Despite my continued dislike for the scent of cigarette smoke, I found myself understanding why they were doing it. It was a type of solidarity, accepting others’ habits to avoid personal hypocrisy, a mutual understanding that the feeling cigarettes and vapes provide is just so lovely.

So lovely.


Like bagels and discounts? Check out Ess-a-Bagel and bring your student I.D. for 10% off your sandwich!


By Sophie Rounds

Sophie Rounds is a rising junior at Loyola University Chicago, double majoring in creative writing and Spanish. She loves to read and wishes she were a better cook. When she is not reading or writing, she enjoys singing in several choirs at her university and thrifting with her friends.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Chapter 6- Returning to Boston and My First Internship

Friday, September 3rd, 2021

I feel like it would be too bold (and perhaps slightly cheesy) to say that studying abroad changed my life. It doesn’t feel like I was in London that long ago, especially since the COVID-19 pandemic has warped my sense of time, so it’s hard to view that experience retrospectively. However, I can confidently say that studying abroad influenced how I approached my following spring semester at Boston University when I returned.

I wanted to be more outgoing and adventurous in Boston, like I had become in London. So, I decided to seize more opportunities to do activities outside of campus. For example, I went to two Beanpot games with a friend. Beanpot, for those not familiar with the Boston area, is a hockey tournament between BU, Northeastern University, Boston College and Harvard University held at TD Garden. I had seen hockey games on campus, but never fathomed going off-campus to see a game during a weeknight when I had class early the next day because I’m not a huge hockey fanatic. I thought it might be fun to go to a Beanpot game at least once, though, and it was. I’m still not the world’s biggest hockey fan, but I did enjoy watching the game intently and cheering on the BU team.

Beanpot game at TD Garden

A week after the Beanpot tournament, I went on a weekend trip to Philadelphia with some friends. I had been to Philly before with my family and we typically just went to the same places repeatedly, so when my friend invited me to go, I agreed. It seemed like the perfect opportunity to hang out with friends, be a little touristy and go to some spots I had never been to before. We saw the Liberty Bell, ran up the Rocky Steps (well, I half-jogged), ate Philly cheesesteaks, etc.

The best part of the weekend was definitely going to Philadelphia’s Magic Garden, which is an outdoor mosaic art gallery. It was stunning, and being surrounded by an array of intentionally-placed art pieces in the labyrinth was incredible. 

Exploring the labyrinth that is Philadelphia’s Magic Garden

I wasn’t just outgoing in terms of going out and exploring the city. The spring semester was also when I started applying for my first internships. Finding an internship was always something at the back of my mind, but I was so busy and stressed by classes that I decided to focus on my academics. By the spring of my junior year, though, I felt like I had learned how to manage my time well enough to handle having an internship. 

Also, it began to dawn on me that after the spring ended, I would be entering my final year before graduating. I wanted to start figuring out what exactly I wanted to do with my life. I had become an English major because I loved reading and writing and they were things that I thought I was pretty good at. This did not mean that I knew what I wanted to pursue as a career. There were people around me who had internships and knew exactly what they wanted to do after they graduated, which did, admittedly, put pressure on me. However, I was mostly eager to find out what direction my life would take. 

I worked hard on creating the perfect resume and cover letter and had a lot of help from the Internet. I Googled examples of both and tried to use them as guidelines to perfect mine. I spent a lot of time reading, reviewing and revising these application elements until the perfectionist in me realized that I was obsessing too much over tiny details. Then, I finally applied to a few internships that I found on Handshake.

I think that the freshman version of myself would have been panicking all day, every day, until I heard something back. I would have worried about whether I was good enough and fretted over the fear of failure. Fortunately, junior year me had a distinct mindset. Of course I would like to have an internship yet overthinking things that were outside of my control was not going to help me in any way. Even if it was challenging to do so, I just had to focus on the aspects of my life that I could control.

I was soon accepted into an internship with a literary agency. Basically, the internship entailed me reading over submitted manuscripts and providing my feedback. It was interesting to read the stories of various writers. It also reminded me how much I love reading for fun. Since I had to read so much for my classes, I really didn’t read for pleasure in college during my spare time. Looking through the manuscripts, though, it felt as if I was back in high school, when I used to read to pass the time. The internship also showed me how much I value storytelling. People have so many worlds, experiences and ideas to share in their writing and the thought of helping writers publish their works appealed to me. So, the internship certainly made me feel like I was taking a step forward in figuring out what I wanted to do with my future. 

If you are looking for an internship, my best advice is this:

  • Make sure to double-check your resume and cover letter. There are many examples of both online that you can check out. Also, your college’s career center might offer some helpful services, such as appointments to review your resume and mock interviews.
  • Don’t be afraid to apply to a variety of places. 
  • If you get an internship, seize the chance to make connections, network, learn new things and ask questions.

By: Monica Manzo

Monica Manzo recently completed her undergraduate studies at Boston University where she majored in English and minored in History. Currently, she is planning on applying for some masters programs in publishing. In her free time, she can be found either reading or adding to her pile of unread books.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Chapter Three: Exercise & Mental Health in the Big Picture

Sunday, August 29th, 2021

I have had a complicated relationship with exercise since I was a child. I began swimming when I was six years old at the behest of my mother. I am not a competitive person, and being forced to competitively swim through elementary, middle, and high school wore significantly on my mental health, past even the point of depression. My mother had no sympathy for me when I explained to her how horrible competitive swimming made me feel, and accused me of “laziness” among other things. I quit the day I turned 18 and now, at age 23, I still have not stepped in a pool since.

Seeing Simone Biles’ journey during the Tokyo 2021 Olympics has been incredibly validating because she respects the seriousness of mental health and recognizes how difficult it is to maintain as a serious athlete. Simone withdrew from part of it because of the physical danger her mental health posed toward her ability to complete her routine without becoming injured. When the (potential) injury is physical, it is often easier for others (not speaking for Piers Morgan) to understand the implications of poor mental health. When there are simply ambiguous ideas of depression or anxiety, one’s mother or coach can thoughtlessly reply: “Stop being so negative.” This gaslighting is incredibly infuriating, but mostly hurtful. 

These days, I crave a routine, when I used to detest it. The book Nausea by John Paul Sartre gave me the words to describe how I had previously felt in a creative writing piece: “I felt disgust and disappointment toward myself and toward everyone. Why can’t everyone just do what they want? Why must we play roles and condemn ourselves to routine? I need routine; my need for the right way to live is despicable.” 


My well-used and cherished copy of Nausea.

But now I’m not so weirdy resentful: routine helps me feel more in control of my daily life rather than suffocated by it. In your daily life, as long as you feel, and you are affected by the consequences of your own and others’ actions, everything you do matters. I love that notion because, while it used to make me anxious (since how I exercised was dictated by others), it now bolsters my individual agency. I am not telling you what I think you should do to make your body feel better or stronger or more yours. There is no “secret” to total self-acceptance. All I know is that only you know how you feel; even your therapist does not live in your mind. Neither do your parents, coaches, or teachers. Although ideally these figures should want to help you, sometimes they can’t because they don’t think the same way, and their lives have been informed by different circumstances. 

It’s okay to take your time and experiment with a routine. Mine still changes year to year. With COVID-19, it has been a particularly difficult year of coping, especially after my routine was entirely upended from one day to the next. I had been going to the gym for three days a week consistently over the prior year. I felt confident in my strength and endurance, and I was proud of myself. 


They usually draw a funny comic on the whiteboard at 404 (to get your workout started with a smile?): “Hey, dude, when I said ‘curls might help’ that’s not what I meant.”

Without a gym, I have no desire to exercise. During my year in isolation I lost all of the aforementioned progress and now have to start over. It’s okay, though: day by day. 

If you’re like me, and prefer to work out independently without instruction, colleges usually have a free gym you can attend as a student. My go-to gym at NYU is 404 Fitness, near which you can also find a Rumble boxing studio, and SoulCycle. If you want to be part of a club team in college, you can join intramural sports. If you want to do something more competitive you can look for sports within college divisions. If you don’t feel quite ready to take a class or go to the gym, or you just need a break from building your intensity, taking walks offers a more casual, but effective form of movement. 

 It’s okay to not “seamlessly” transition your lifestyle into going to the gym three times a week instead of none, or toward becoming a vegetarian, for example. Sometimes you will step outside of those goals simply because the world is not currently allowing for it, or you want to do something more, or maybe the transition doesn’t feel good anymore, which is okay. When you cannot control things, that is when it’s fun to simply be along for the ride (a passenger, as I like to say). In the big picture, your mental health should have a mutualistically symbiotic relationship with when and how you exercise. 

A brief summary of advice:

  • During college, take advantage of free gym memberships/ collegiate club sports
  • I am not telling you what I think you should do to make your body feel better or stronger or more yours. There is no “secret” to total self-acceptance; it occurs on a rolling basis throughout your life. 
    • Being a “passenger” is my way of describing my most reliable mode of self-preservation; you are not at fault for what you can’t control
  • Check out Jameela Jamil’s social media (Twitter/Instagram) and her podcast “iWeigh” through both of which she deeply and personally discusses a multitude of topics with individuals with personal experiences/experts regarding mental health, eating disorders, working out, feminism, etc. 
    • This has grown to largely inform a lot of my mindset regarding the language I use to discuss exercise, physicality, and nutrition


By: Anna Matefy

Anna Matefy recently graduated from NYU with a Bachelor’s in Media, Culture, and Communication. She has been working in politics for the past few years, and wants to transition into a career in media entertainment/comedy. She will be attending NYU as a graduate student in Media beginning in 2021.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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