Posts Tagged ‘student savings’

When Campus Food Doesn’t Cut It

Wednesday, June 12th, 2024

Picture this: it’s a Sunday afternoon. Your stomach is grumbling. Your head is spinning. You ask yourself: “Where am I going to get my next meal?” You sift through your mental Rolodex of campus food options and your heart and stomach sink in sickening tandem. You, anguished student, come to a conclusion: “I don’t want any of this.”

As students confined to greasy or undercooked campus food, we must explore the options of buying and cooking your own food. We must venture outside the iron gates to a local grocery store!

There are three things to take into consideration when choosing where to shop: price, location, and food quality. The first, and arguably most important, is price. Most of us students can’t break the bank whenever we’re craving some non-campus food, especially those living in New York City. When everything inexplicably costs $30, affordable options are a must. The second is location. While we all would like to think we’re able to lug a heavy bag of groceries a mile home, we should be careful not to get caught in our own hubris. The third is food quality. Being cognizant of the freshness of the food you buy might save you a bout of stomach trouble!

For this chapter, I’ve asked my friends, roommates, and fellow grocery-shoppers on a student’s budget: where should I buy my groceries?

The most popular choice is Modern Market, at 2385 Arthur Ave. Modern Market is my personal favorite for its fresh produce and convenient location. While it’s on the more expensive side, I’m a firm believer that sometimes it’s worth it to splurge on quality fall fruits, spring veggies, winter legumes, etc.

Modern Market is situated between 186th and 187th in a particularly lush block of Arthur Ave.
Image credit: yelp.com

Those who recommended Fine Fare on 2645 Webster Ave do so most emphatically. Boasting low prices and wide aisles, Fine Fare fans insist that this fine establishment is worth the walk to the other side of the Metro North train tracks. On a personal note, my roommates shop at Fine Fare, and while they return from grocery shopping panting, sweating, and sore, they are never complaining.

Fine Fare has that nostalgic feel that’s worth the walk.
Image credit: marketreportblog.com

If you’re interested in a Fordham-specific option, the Arthur Avenue retail market is definitely the most expensive (costing an AARM and a leg! haha), but has probably the best quality groceries and fresh food available in the immediate area. There are over a dozen vendors peddling their specialties, including but not limited to: fresh fruit, cured meats, coffee, and even cigars! However, given this odd assortment of available goods, I’d argue that the retail market is more of a touristy experience than a reliable grocery spot.

The Arthur Ave retail market really feels like a whole other world.
Image credit: edc.nyc

A final option: getting groceries delivered from Aldi. Some people I know swear by this, saying that it’s affordable, convenient, and good for resisting temptation to buy junk food because you don’t physically see it. If you’re on a specific diet, or if you’re just trying to steer yourself away from Ben & Jerry’s or Tostitos Hint of Lime chips (not speaking from experience or anything), this is a good option. 

However, in the spirit of engaging with one’s community, I can’t in good faith recommend that you ONLY order groceries online from a large chain! It’s important to support local businesses like the ones I mentioned before. Get out there and talk to people—recluses don’t have any fun. So buy your own groceries, like a grown-up!

For a special student discount on groceries near you, check out Uptown Whole Foods!

by Mia Crocco

Mia is a rising junior at Fordham University – Rose Hill studying English and theology. In her free time, Mia enjoys cooking, collaging, and playing the piano and guitar.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Da Long Yi Hot Pot: A Meal for Everyone

Wednesday, May 1st, 2024

For a fun group gathering, Da Long Yi Hot Pot makes the dinner experience more than just sharing a meal. Located in Lower Allston in an area some call the “Second Chinatown” near Boston University, this hot pot restaurant is easily accessible by bus, train, or car. Nearby on the same street are tons of exciting bubble tea cafes, dessert restaurants, sushi take-out stores, and much more for any hungry student looking for a snack post-hot pot meal (if you still have room in your stomach). The restaurant was clean, and the atmosphere facilitated great conversations with my friends in a quiet setting. There was plenty of space, with almost three separate rooms, a place for smaller groups, or a big dining room for parties over ten.

For people like me who are unsure about the art form of eating hot pot with many different types of dishes, I’m here to tell you the basics. Hot pot is like cooking an array of ingredients like a soup, but your friends are seated around a single pot at a table. Once the ingredients are cooked, you can transfer them to your own smaller bowl, dip them in sauces, or drink them like soup. Hot pot is typically associated with Chinese food, with the broth seasoned with various flavors from soy sauce to sesame oil to Sichuan peppercorns. Add thinly sliced meats, tofu, cabbage, shrimp, noodles, root vegetables, and more. The order of cooking is typically done in batches depending on the cooking time for each ingredient, but it is essential to remember to wait until the broth is boiling before eating. Hot pot is communal, so it is a great meal to share with friends and family, and it is cost-effective, too!

I have only experienced hot pot family style in the comforts of my own home, so I brought three friends along with me who were both eager to try a new hot pot restaurant and fill their rumbling stomachs. Immediately when my friends and I entered the restaurant, we were greeted by friendly and accommodating staff who provided recommendations on the menu and their signature dishes. I was glad they offered suggestions for the meal because there were so many different varieties of meats and meat cuts to choose from. As we were shown to our table in a quiet area, the staff also showed us an assortment of dipping sauces that we could pick and choose from on a table. My favorite side dish, pickled daikon, a root vegetable, was among the choices for side dishes, and I returned to the table for a second serving later in my meal. 

My friends and I settled on the two flavor pots, choosing spicy beef and mushroom as our two broth options. As someone who cannot handle spice, I found it nice that there were multiple options for spice levels on the menu and various meat and vegetarian soup bases. My other friends appreciated spice and beef more, which they eagerly ate with their meal instead. Our meat options included ribeye, pork belly, fish balls, meatballs, and shrimp paste. For our vegetables, we chose an assortment of cabbage, mushrooms, and corn. The restaurant was extremely flexible in our customizations, and there was something on the menu for all my friends. I love this type of meal, as we were able to add more ingredients to our soup base once we finished our first round of ingredient choices. My friends wanted a different style of tofu, pork belly, and another beef plate, which we quickly ordered and came out at a perfect time in our meal. My friend was also craving a smoothie, and the banana smoothie he chose tasted like it used fresh ingredients. 

Eating at Da Long Yi Hot Pot is an experience I’ll never forget. My friends and I had a fantastic time catching up over a warm and flavorful meal. For those experienced in the art of eating hot pot or are beginners like me, this place is welcoming to all with its pleasant atmosphere and easy-to-read yet diverse menu. I feel confident I could take any of my friends there again next time as their menu had gluten-free and vegetarian options, too. The servers were all kind and helpful and offered various traditional and unique dishes for the whole table. If anyone is unsure about their next meal with friends, I highly recommend treating yourself to some hot pot, exciting your taste buds while partaking in an active, engaging meal.



By Lecia Sun

Lecia is a student at Tufts University studying Classics and World Literature. When she is not reading, she can be found attempting the New York Times Games, trying out a new creative hobby, and dreaming about her next great bake. 


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Chapter 3: Do You Also Think Women are Hot?: Coming to Terms with my Sexuality

Monday, October 2nd, 2023

Before I had moved into college, when I first started talking to my future roommate Kathy, I had convinced myself I was straight. Yes, I knew I had thoughts in my head about women that most straight people wouldn’t have, but I just repressed them because I didn’t know many queer people in my life and didn’t know who to talk to for help.

When we were in our first lockdown from COVID, I had literally nothing to do other than think, watch movies, think again, maybe do a TikTok challenge, and then think some more. Basically, I had a lot of time to reflect on my years in high school and how I almost never had a real crush on any guys and why I really enjoyed watching the “Lay All Your Love On Me” scene from Mamma Mia!. But, like I said before, I just kept ignoring those thoughts and keeping them to myself. Until Kathy informed me that she was actually gay.

I didn’t immediately come out to her when she told me. I’m pretty sure I said something like “Cool! I’m straight though,” and then we started talking about the show Glee (which I should’ve just accepted the fact that I was gay at that point…what straight person goes through a Glee phase when they’re 14). Once Kathy came out to me, I decided I would accept the fact that I like women to myself, but I wasn’t ready to come out just yet.

I won’t lie, when I chose Pace University, I knew it had a positive LGBTQ+ community and that definitely helped a bit when making my decision. So knowing this, I experimented with the idea of being out on campus because I would be around new people and it wouldn’t really affect my home life. However, that changed one fateful night before me and all my high school friends were about to separate and start our new lives in our own schools. The five of us sat in my basement and somehow, one person came out and then suddenly everyone started coming out. Which may sound strange if you’re a straight person reading this, but this specific moment, I discovered later on, happens to a lot of queer kids and is what I refer to as a “canon queer event,” aka a rite of passage.

So, with this new sudden bravery I found from my high school friends, I texted Kathy that night like “hey! I’m actually bisexual!”. And thus began my year of accepting to myself and others that I think women are hot and I’m proud of it!

During my freshman year, almost all of the friends I made ended up being queer. My current roommate now is queer and it’s also what helped us bond! Freshman year was my first year out and it was scary but ultimately exciting.I don’t regret it one bit.

But then summer came and I was home and alone with my thoughts again. I still had never been in any relationship before, but I was talking to people on dating apps. Nothing ever happened with those dating apps though. I only ever found myself talking to guys for a week and then ultimately ghosting them for literally no reason at all. All I knew is that something felt wrong. Not wrong with the guys, but wrong with me.


Me and my roommate Nellie in stupid hats our sophomore year

So, I texted my new roommate (who is also still my current roommate), Nellie, and asked if they had any idea why my brain was like this. Nellie and I had only been friends for a little less than a year at this point, but they managed to help me when I was feeling my lowest. They were the first person I told when I discovered the “Lesbian Masterdoc” (a document discussing compulsive heterosexuality from queer women) and the first person that I said “I think I might be a lesbian” to. And if I’m being fully honest, without this friendship with them, I maybe never would have had the courage to accept it. Which may seem strange because if I had already come out as bisexual, then why is coming out as a lesbian any different? To which I will respond with, read the lesbian masterdoc and discover compulsive heterosexuality and how the strict gender roles within our society mess with the female mind. If I wrote all about that this blog would be the length of the bible.


Me my sophomore year at a Pride at Pace prom event

Coming into my sophomore year, I had the strength to come out properly because of Nellie and we even attended Pace’s pride club for students together. Then, by junior year, the two of us became president and vice president of the club! The club helped me finally become comfortable with my sexuality and eventually gave me the courage to come out to my family the next summer.

By junior year, I was writing paper after paper about what it means to be a lesbian and I found one of my passions when it comes to writing. None of this would have been possible without the friends I made at school and I will forever be grateful for them. If you’re an incoming freshman, and you’re not ready to come out, there is no pressure for you to do so. But I strongly recommend finding people that are a part of your community to give you a helping hand when it’s needed.


Me petting a dog at NYC Pride in 2022 wearing a lesbian flag cape

Summary:

  • Before I met anyone from school, I was too scared to come out to anyone even myself
  • Once I started talking to people who are also queer, I started to gain my confidence with my own sexuality
  • I joined the pride club and moved in with my roommate who helped me find courage to come out
  • Finding people within your community can help you out in the future

Enjoy a Taco Tuesday at Cafe Habana and get a great deal! Show this flyer and student ID!

By Mia Ilie

Mia Ilie is a student at Pace University, graduating in May 2024 with a degree in Writing and Rhetoric and a focus on publishing. She grew up in Rockland, New York and is currently living in Westchester, New York where she attends school and works at a local bookstore. You can always find her with her nose in a book or screaming to Taylor Swift with her friends.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Chapter 2: Hi, I’m Mia! Please Be My Friend!

Monday, September 25th, 2023

Once I had officially decided to go to Pace University, the next step was to find friends and someone I feel comfortable to live with. Pace has a designated building where freshmen live, so I couldn’t live with my friend since they were two years older. Even if I could, though, I didn’t want to. I knew that if I chose to live with someone I already knew, I would be too scared to branch out on my own and I wanted the independence of finding my own friend.

Part of my Facebook post from the Pace Facebook group for incoming freshman

So for the first time in several months (maybe even years), I opened up Facebook and edited my profile before searching for Pace University Facebook groups. The groups are student-made as a way to find fellow incoming classmates and potential roommates. I found two groups, joined both, and began adding almost everyone I thought wasn’t intimidating on Snapchat. Honestly, it felt like a dating app. Sometimes I would hit it off with people, and other times we would say hi and then instantly stop talking.

By June I was getting nervous, because the deadline for finding a roommate was coming up and I still hadn’t really clicked with anyone. It was also important I felt comfortable in my own room and because it was 2020, I wanted to make sure I was living with someone who respected COVID guidelines.

Me and Kathy after we both moved in

A few days into June I received a DM (direct message) from someone on Instagram. At first I was confused as to who this person was, but then I realized they found me from the Pace Facebook group, so I responded to her message. Instantly we clicked. We had all the same interests, were both nervous but willing to meet new people on campus, and were careful with COVID. Kathy (her name) and I ended up chatting everyday and eventually found the rest of our suitemates (the freshmen building had suites instead of just a classic two person or three person dorm).

With my suitemates and I texting each other every day, the idea of going to college seemed less intimidating now that I had more than just one friend. I was beginning to get excited as we all texted each other about what one person was packing, what movies we would watch on movie nights, and what clubs we were all interested in.

Me and a couple of my suitemates

If you’re an incoming freshman, I strongly recommend searching for any type of online group to meet new people. Having some form of established relationships will definitely help ease the anxiety of moving away from home. Even if you eventually find new friends or fall out with the old ones, you will always still have that bond with your freshman roommates. Nothing can take away that old nostalgic feeling of moving in for the first time and taking your first steps into the real world with these people. 

My suitemates and I would attend different events on campus, a lot of them virtual, some of them with social distancing, and together we all found friends. To this day, I’m still friends with my freshman year roommate and suitemate, and I’m forever grateful for them and the steps of courage we took together. We don’t live with each other anymore, but we still support each other and hang out together when we can.

However, I think my suitemates and I did have one unfair advantage that helped us grow close early on. Normal suitemates or roommates have a special bond because they are entering the real world together, but my suitemates and I actually didn’t get to take any steps outside because for two weeks we were all locked in our suite thanks to an increase in COVID cases. That’s right…in October, the entire freshman building got put into lockdown, forcing everyone to stay in their rooms for a whole two weeks.

To this day we still make jokes about how we were all trauma bonded because of this. We had to stay in our rooms, have crappy food delivered to our dorms, and watch movies almost every night to keep us from going insane. COVID may have made our freshman year difficult, but it also gave us a suitemate bond like no other.

I’d also like to mention the fact that, despite my suitemates and I helping each other out with meeting new people, my specific roommate Kathy was like a professional “friend maker.” Almost everyday she was introducing me to someone new. Thanks to Kathy, I met some of my best friends, one being my current roommate in my senior year!

My current roommate (middle), one of my best friends (on the right), and I on Halloween 2020. We all connected thanks to Kathy!

Another tip if you’re an introverted freshman like I was, make sure to meet someone who is very extroverted like Kathy is. This way, you’ll always be meeting someone new and each day will be exciting, and really that’s what every day of your freshman year should feel like. Even if you’re dealing with a global pandemic.

Summary:

  • Why Facebook groups are helpful before going to college
  • Go to events and clubs on campus! It’s the best way to meet friends!
  • Freshman year is all about excitement and meeting new people, don’t be afraid to try new things

Get 10% off any purchase at Baya Bar and enjoy a smoothie or acai bowl! Remember to bring your student ID!

By Mia Ilie

Mia Ilie is a student at Pace University, graduating in May 2024 with a degree in Writing and Rhetoric and a focus on publishing. She grew up in Rockland, New York and is currently living in Westchester, New York where she attends school and works at a local bookstore. You can always find her with her nose in a book or screaming to Taylor Swift with her friends.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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College Student Grocery Haul @ LifeThyme Market

Saturday, November 19th, 2022
Watch NYU student Senaida shop for organic groceries at LifeThyme Natural Market on 8th St. and 6th Ave.

While shopping, try the coffee and muffin combo at LifeThyme!

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Chapter Three: Exercise & Mental Health in the Big Picture

Sunday, August 29th, 2021

I have had a complicated relationship with exercise since I was a child. I began swimming when I was six years old at the behest of my mother. I am not a competitive person, and being forced to competitively swim through elementary, middle, and high school wore significantly on my mental health, past even the point of depression. My mother had no sympathy for me when I explained to her how horrible competitive swimming made me feel, and accused me of “laziness” among other things. I quit the day I turned 18 and now, at age 23, I still have not stepped in a pool since.

Seeing Simone Biles’ journey during the Tokyo 2021 Olympics has been incredibly validating because she respects the seriousness of mental health and recognizes how difficult it is to maintain as a serious athlete. Simone withdrew from part of it because of the physical danger her mental health posed toward her ability to complete her routine without becoming injured. When the (potential) injury is physical, it is often easier for others (not speaking for Piers Morgan) to understand the implications of poor mental health. When there are simply ambiguous ideas of depression or anxiety, one’s mother or coach can thoughtlessly reply: “Stop being so negative.” This gaslighting is incredibly infuriating, but mostly hurtful. 

These days, I crave a routine, when I used to detest it. The book Nausea by John Paul Sartre gave me the words to describe how I had previously felt in a creative writing piece: “I felt disgust and disappointment toward myself and toward everyone. Why can’t everyone just do what they want? Why must we play roles and condemn ourselves to routine? I need routine; my need for the right way to live is despicable.” 


My well-used and cherished copy of Nausea.

But now I’m not so weirdy resentful: routine helps me feel more in control of my daily life rather than suffocated by it. In your daily life, as long as you feel, and you are affected by the consequences of your own and others’ actions, everything you do matters. I love that notion because, while it used to make me anxious (since how I exercised was dictated by others), it now bolsters my individual agency. I am not telling you what I think you should do to make your body feel better or stronger or more yours. There is no “secret” to total self-acceptance. All I know is that only you know how you feel; even your therapist does not live in your mind. Neither do your parents, coaches, or teachers. Although ideally these figures should want to help you, sometimes they can’t because they don’t think the same way, and their lives have been informed by different circumstances. 

It’s okay to take your time and experiment with a routine. Mine still changes year to year. With COVID-19, it has been a particularly difficult year of coping, especially after my routine was entirely upended from one day to the next. I had been going to the gym for three days a week consistently over the prior year. I felt confident in my strength and endurance, and I was proud of myself. 


They usually draw a funny comic on the whiteboard at 404 (to get your workout started with a smile?): “Hey, dude, when I said ‘curls might help’ that’s not what I meant.”

Without a gym, I have no desire to exercise. During my year in isolation I lost all of the aforementioned progress and now have to start over. It’s okay, though: day by day. 

If you’re like me, and prefer to work out independently without instruction, colleges usually have a free gym you can attend as a student. My go-to gym at NYU is 404 Fitness, near which you can also find a Rumble boxing studio, and SoulCycle. If you want to be part of a club team in college, you can join intramural sports. If you want to do something more competitive you can look for sports within college divisions. If you don’t feel quite ready to take a class or go to the gym, or you just need a break from building your intensity, taking walks offers a more casual, but effective form of movement. 

 It’s okay to not “seamlessly” transition your lifestyle into going to the gym three times a week instead of none, or toward becoming a vegetarian, for example. Sometimes you will step outside of those goals simply because the world is not currently allowing for it, or you want to do something more, or maybe the transition doesn’t feel good anymore, which is okay. When you cannot control things, that is when it’s fun to simply be along for the ride (a passenger, as I like to say). In the big picture, your mental health should have a mutualistically symbiotic relationship with when and how you exercise. 

A brief summary of advice:

  • During college, take advantage of free gym memberships/ collegiate club sports
  • I am not telling you what I think you should do to make your body feel better or stronger or more yours. There is no “secret” to total self-acceptance; it occurs on a rolling basis throughout your life. 
    • Being a “passenger” is my way of describing my most reliable mode of self-preservation; you are not at fault for what you can’t control
  • Check out Jameela Jamil’s social media (Twitter/Instagram) and her podcast “iWeigh” through both of which she deeply and personally discusses a multitude of topics with individuals with personal experiences/experts regarding mental health, eating disorders, working out, feminism, etc. 
    • This has grown to largely inform a lot of my mindset regarding the language I use to discuss exercise, physicality, and nutrition


By: Anna Matefy

Anna Matefy recently graduated from NYU with a Bachelor’s in Media, Culture, and Communication. She has been working in politics for the past few years, and wants to transition into a career in media entertainment/comedy. She will be attending NYU as a graduate student in Media beginning in 2021.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Restaurant Review: 99 Cent Fresh Pizza

Wednesday, July 21st, 2021

99 Cent Fresh pizza is your best friend. 99 Cent Fresh pizza will greet you in whatever condition: rain or shine, night and day. 99 Cent Fresh pizza is there for you coming home from a long day and 99 Cent Fresh pizza is there for you when you stumble in with only a dollar in your wallet. 99 Cent Fresh pizza is everywhere and open from morning until just before the sun rises. 99 Cent Fresh Pizza is God’s greatest creation and have I mentioned that 99 Cent Fresh pizza costs 99 cents?

Look, New York City is expensive. Coming from Texas where big portions are met with low prices, the fact of groceries and restaurants being more expensive than what I was used to gave me quite a headache. So, it was like magic in my freshman year walking down Second Avenue, and seeing it there—a place where pizza sells for only a dollar a slice. It felt heaven sent.

As I’ve mentioned before, 99 Cent Fresh Pizza and its competitors in the 99 cent pizza market are everywhere. Most are found in Manhattan, but they can be as far flung as the North Bronx and Flatbush. Because of the high rent and slim profit margins, they’re typically hidden gems, small hole-in-the-wall places squeezed into narrow spaces. However, the signs above are easy to catch, and most locations are smart enough to be on major avenues or near parks. For the purpose of the review, we’ll go to the first one I went to and the closest one to my apartment on Second Avenue and Fourth.

The place fits the typical M.O.: small, narrow, just enough room to order and get out as soon as the slices are handed to you. Despite its name, only the cheese slice will cost a dollar; the most expensive slice, the Buffalo Chicken slice, will cost a whopping two dollars. Toppings are 50 cents each and pies range from eight dollars to fifteen dollars, two bucks per additional topping. The math is astounding. Regular pizza, slice or pie, costs two to three times greater than what they’re serving, yet here it is, a whole meal for you in under ten dollars. Deals like buy two slices of cheese and a drink for $2.75 make it even more ridiculous to consider, yet tempting to buy.

I bought the $2.75 meal and the pizza tasted, well, cheap. What else do you expect? The cheese lacks character, the sauce is barely there, and the crust at times tastes a little too sweet; but all three components balanced out to provide a satisfying taste, and there’s no feeling of bloating or pizza sweat that comes with other places. It’s delicious, better than more expensive slices I’ve gotten in the City. And with the context of price in mind, how it turned out is a miracle of human ingenuity.

As time goes on, and rents rise and inflation rises, I fear that 99 Cent Fresh Pizza may have to change its branding in order to stay open. There will inevitably be a time when it becomes 149 Cent Fresh Pizza or heaven forbid 199 Cent Fresh Pizza. So, do yourself a favor, treat yourself to a New York City institution, and get some cheap good 99 cent pizza now.


Jared Skoro is a junior at NYU Gallatin studying a mix of English, Political Science, and Psychology. In his free time, he enjoys reading, hiking, and exploring a new neighborhood of the city every weekend.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Soothing Creative Spaces in the City

Monday, July 19th, 2021

I love New York and I don’t think I’ll ever grow tired of exploring the city. But I am not always in the mood for chaotic, cramped places that demand large amounts of money for me to just sit down for a few moments. Over time I’ve been able to find spaces of relative quiet and stillness that offer a creative environment and affordable prices. 

I find these places therapeutic. Inhabiting these soothing and creative spaces offers an effective salve for any icky sensations that come along with balancing the highs and the lows of the human condition amidst a chaotic world. In these spaces I am often led to ponder or participate in creativity. When I do the act of creating, I can process, release, and emerge from my feelings with something tangible to be proud of. When I am appreciating the creativity of others–watching, reading, thinking– I can give my own brain a break, stepping outside of my mind and body for a while. It’s something beyond escapism. It’s a practice in empathy, an exercise of meditation.

This activity is something that I can do alone or with others. Alone I can fill an empty journal page with freewriting or I can sit with an interesting book for the afternoon. But I can also join with others in creative activities like group trips to museums, book clubs, and writing workshops. 

In New York City there is chaos but also countless hubs of stillness. If you know where to look, you can surround yourself with creativity and soothing company. You can find therapy for your anxious mind and create colorful memories in the meantime. Here are some spaces for quiet meditation and creativity in Manhattan. 


Book Club Bar. Image Credit: https://www.nycgo.com/shopping/book-club-bar/

Book Club Bar

197 E 3rd St, New York, NY 10009

This bookstore cafe is located near Tompkins park. It offers refreshments, bookshelves, sofa chairs, and an open yet cozy atmosphere. It is accessible into the evening time and can be a beautiful place to lose yourself for a few hours in the company of other beings at rest.


The Astor Chinese Garden Court. Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/markjoesting/4721702647

The Astor Chinese Garden Court 

Central Park West, New York, NY 10028

This court, an interior/exterior blend, is a sort of hidden gem within the Met. It is one of the few exhibit areas that is intended to be interacted with and appreciated for long periods of time. Bring a book and sit by the soothing coy pond for a couple of hours. 


Alice’s Tea Cup. Image Credit: https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d479388-Reviews-Alice_s_Tea_Cup-New_York_City_New_York.html

Alice’s Tea Cup

102nd W73rd St

This imaginative tea shop allows for a themed tea service and other meals. As you sit and sip you are immersed in the world of Alice and surrounded by related artistic renderings. It’s tea with a pleasant twist! 


The Bean at Astor Place. Image Credit: https://astorplace.nyc/directory/bean

The Bean (Astor Place) 

31 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10003

The Bean is a classic and affordable coffee shop. While here, you can take advantage of the free wifi, student discount, indoor and outdoor seating, and overall creative aesthetic of the place! 


NYU Bobst Library. Image Credit: https://meet.nyu.edu/life/nyu-study-spots-study-in-comfort-and-style/

*University Resources

Check out your university’s libraries, study spaces, and other lounge areas for points of calm and creativity. 


Here are only a few options at your disposal to unwind, relax, and create or escape into something wonderful. 


By: Taylor Custis

Taylor Custis is a recent graduate of NYU where she made her own major because it sounded like a cool thing to do. She enjoys stories of all kinds, ethnic foods, and spiritually charged candles. She is currently in Queens embarking on a career in written and visual storytelling.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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How to Get Ahead of Prices and People for Theatre This Summer and Fall

Tuesday, July 13th, 2021

Theatre’s been gone for almost a year and a half now, and with plans to reopen shortly, here’s some tips on how to get the most bang for your buck when it comes to shows.

Image credit: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/29/theater/how-to-get-cheap-theater-tickets-including-hamilton.html

We all know that Broadway shows can be expensive. Even the producers who set the high prices know that, so they’ll often offer tickets at reduced prices in a lottery. These tickets would be available at the box office the day of the show, or online the day of the show; and those who get them are selected by random chance. It’s the cheapest option to get tickets, but the odds are highly variable due to the number of tickets offered and the hundreds or thousands that apply in the lottery. Therefore, it’s best to consider lotteries as a spur-in-the-moment option: great if you get it, okay if you don’t. Comparable prices are found in standing-room where you pay money to stand in the back of the theatre and watch the show from there, but the view isn’t great

Now for an option where you can actually plan to get cheap tickets and watch the show, TodayTix is the app I swear on. My entire freshman year (up to Covid) was spent milking this app for as many tickets to Broadway and off-Broadway shows as possible. What I like about it, and what makes TodayTix stand out from competitors like the TKTS booth at Times Square is that you don’t have to buy tickets on the day of the show; you can buy tickets months in advance at half the price of regular tickets. I was able to see shows at a cost between sixty to eighty dollars for Broadway, forty to sixty dollars off-Broadway at any night from celebrity-studded productions like 2019’s Betrayal to musical megahits like West Side Story. Though you don’t have a choice in where you are seated, I have never been disappointed as the tickets seat you in really good spots, better ones I’d say and at cheaper costs than those who get regular tickets. It’s an app I’ll be returning to use this fall and for any show I’ll see in the future.

Image credit: https://www.todaytix.com/nyc/shows/23288-seven-deadly-sins

But maybe you’re impatient. Broadway really only opens in September and October and you don’t want to wait months after getting tickets on TodayTix, nor do you feel like going through the whole lottery process. Here’s another tip. Broadway is overrated. Really. In their ticket prices, the struggle for good seats in the theatre, and the crowds to dodge in and out of the theatre (and those you have to get past in Times Square); Broadway sometimes isn’t the best option. Good thing there’s off-Broadway and other theatrical productions sprinkled throughout the City to provide the same entertainment at much cheaper prices and in a more inclusive, interactive environment. And unlike Broadway, there’s some off-Broadway shows open this summer! Seven Deadly Sins, The Office! A Musical Parody, and Blindness to name a few are shows you can buy tickets from and watch this instant this summer. Each production has their own Covid safety standards, so be sure to consult their websites before going to make your informed decision.

The world of theatre is just starting to bloom again, and as restrictions ease and the world returns to a new normal, no doubt the journey to get tickets or experience theatre will be hectic and expensive. Best to prepare beforehand to save money and be at the front of the line.



By: Jared Skoro

Jared Skoro is a junior at NYU Gallatin studying a mix of English, Political Science, and Psychology. In his free time, he enjoys reading, hiking, and exploring a new neighborhood of the city every weekend.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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A List of Student Savings on NYC Cultural Treasure Troves

Saturday, July 10th, 2021


As a college student in New York City I realized that I had access to infinitely more than I had while in high school in Maryland. Suddenly I could eat anywhere, stay out  late, and spend my time doing just about whatever I wanted to do. The way I saw it, as long as I got my assignments done and went to class, I could really do whatever. 

Admittedly, the overstimulation that comes with moving to a bustling metropolis like New York City did not result in much exploration on my part. I found that being a sane human person–eating decently, sleeping enough, keeping my room tidy, maintaining clean clothes, and acing classes– was demanding enough. Furthermore I did not have an unlimited amount of money to spend. I often spent too much when I would eat out or buy a shirt from Forever21 or something. As a broke college student it didn’t take much to break my budget. 

All of these factors coalesced into an interesting and unexpected phenomenon: I became a hermit. I would go to class, eat at a cafeteria, come back to my dorm and sleep, not reemerging until it was time to eat again or do homework. Yes, I was engaging with people in classes, and–thankfully–maintaining relationships with my roommates and a few hall neighbors. But other than a party here or there and a few consumeristic weekends, I found I wasn’t able to engage with people or with the city in a substantial way. 

I had a hard time reconciling the person I was back in Maryland with the person I was in New York. Back home I was constantly exploring. I would subway around DC with friends and we would spend the day visiting museums, monuments, statues, and parks with live music. I would go to the movies constantly, often going by myself to catch matinees. The only time I got to engage with culture like that in NYC was when it was related to a class assignment. The arts had become academic. 

Besides, the culture here was so expensive, I told myself. New York movie tickets were about twice the price as those in Maryland. Museums charged steep admission fees and there wasn’t much free public green space to enjoy. With time, some friendly recommendations, and some personal exploration I found that this was not at all true. I found pockets of the arts and of culture in the downtown Manhattan area (and other places) that were free or discounted with a student ID. 



Here are a few…

The Metropolitan Museum of Art: This museum is known for offering a little bit of everything. Here you can experience art and culture from various time periods and corners of the globe. 

“Pay what you wish” policy with a NY (student) ID. $12 for non-NY students with a university ID. 

The Museum of Modern Art: This museum is a host to all kinds of contemporary art, a large portion being performance art. 

Free for students at select NY schools with ID. $14 for non-NY students with a university ID

The New Museum: This museum is known for its rotating, often groundbreaking and experimental exhibits that center themes like liberation, LGBTQ+ movements, and civil rights.

Free for students 18 and under with ID. $12 for students 19+ with a university ID


Image Credit: https://www.nordenson.com/projects/new-museum-of-contemporary-art

Cinépolis Luxury Cinemas: It’s the movies! What more can I say?

$8 movie tickets for students with a university ID

[Based on my in-person ticket buying experience]

*NYU: Free talks, panels, film screenings, art exhibitions, etc. are at your disposal as an NYU student. Join a few mailing lists and discover some of the amazing cultural moments happening on campus (and now virtually) each week. Here are a few programs to look for: Center for Multicultural Education and Programs (CMEP), Steinhardt Studio Art exhibits, Brittany Hall exhibits, and NYU Gallatin exhibits. 

Other New York colleges and universities are sure to have similar programs and bustling cultural scenes as well. Also ask around for any semi private university green spaces and other university libraries.

*Brooklyn Museum [not in Manhattan]: On the first Saturday of every month, the museum is free to all and hosts several surprises like live music, vendors, and special exhibits.

Free for students 19 and under with ID. $10 for students 20+ with a university ID 


By: Taylor Custis

Taylor Custis is a recent graduate of NYU where she made her own major because it sounded like a cool thing to do. She enjoys stories of all kinds, ethnic foods, and spiritually charged candles. She is currently located in Queens and is embarking on a career in written and visual storytelling.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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