Archive for the ‘onValues’ Category

Da Long Yi Hot Pot: A Meal for Everyone

Wednesday, May 1st, 2024

For a fun group gathering, Da Long Yi Hot Pot makes the dinner experience more than just sharing a meal. Located in Lower Allston in an area some call the “Second Chinatown” near Boston University, this hot pot restaurant is easily accessible by bus, train, or car. Nearby on the same street are tons of exciting bubble tea cafes, dessert restaurants, sushi take-out stores, and much more for any hungry student looking for a snack post-hot pot meal (if you still have room in your stomach). The restaurant was clean, and the atmosphere facilitated great conversations with my friends in a quiet setting. There was plenty of space, with almost three separate rooms, a place for smaller groups, or a big dining room for parties over ten.

For people like me who are unsure about the art form of eating hot pot with many different types of dishes, I’m here to tell you the basics. Hot pot is like cooking an array of ingredients like a soup, but your friends are seated around a single pot at a table. Once the ingredients are cooked, you can transfer them to your own smaller bowl, dip them in sauces, or drink them like soup. Hot pot is typically associated with Chinese food, with the broth seasoned with various flavors from soy sauce to sesame oil to Sichuan peppercorns. Add thinly sliced meats, tofu, cabbage, shrimp, noodles, root vegetables, and more. The order of cooking is typically done in batches depending on the cooking time for each ingredient, but it is essential to remember to wait until the broth is boiling before eating. Hot pot is communal, so it is a great meal to share with friends and family, and it is cost-effective, too!

I have only experienced hot pot family style in the comforts of my own home, so I brought three friends along with me who were both eager to try a new hot pot restaurant and fill their rumbling stomachs. Immediately when my friends and I entered the restaurant, we were greeted by friendly and accommodating staff who provided recommendations on the menu and their signature dishes. I was glad they offered suggestions for the meal because there were so many different varieties of meats and meat cuts to choose from. As we were shown to our table in a quiet area, the staff also showed us an assortment of dipping sauces that we could pick and choose from on a table. My favorite side dish, pickled daikon, a root vegetable, was among the choices for side dishes, and I returned to the table for a second serving later in my meal. 

My friends and I settled on the two flavor pots, choosing spicy beef and mushroom as our two broth options. As someone who cannot handle spice, I found it nice that there were multiple options for spice levels on the menu and various meat and vegetarian soup bases. My other friends appreciated spice and beef more, which they eagerly ate with their meal instead. Our meat options included ribeye, pork belly, fish balls, meatballs, and shrimp paste. For our vegetables, we chose an assortment of cabbage, mushrooms, and corn. The restaurant was extremely flexible in our customizations, and there was something on the menu for all my friends. I love this type of meal, as we were able to add more ingredients to our soup base once we finished our first round of ingredient choices. My friends wanted a different style of tofu, pork belly, and another beef plate, which we quickly ordered and came out at a perfect time in our meal. My friend was also craving a smoothie, and the banana smoothie he chose tasted like it used fresh ingredients. 

Eating at Da Long Yi Hot Pot is an experience I’ll never forget. My friends and I had a fantastic time catching up over a warm and flavorful meal. For those experienced in the art of eating hot pot or are beginners like me, this place is welcoming to all with its pleasant atmosphere and easy-to-read yet diverse menu. I feel confident I could take any of my friends there again next time as their menu had gluten-free and vegetarian options, too. The servers were all kind and helpful and offered various traditional and unique dishes for the whole table. If anyone is unsure about their next meal with friends, I highly recommend treating yourself to some hot pot, exciting your taste buds while partaking in an active, engaging meal.



By Lecia Sun

Lecia is a student at Tufts University studying Classics and World Literature. When she is not reading, she can be found attempting the New York Times Games, trying out a new creative hobby, and dreaming about her next great bake. 


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Creating the Best Version of Yourself

Friday, April 5th, 2024
Sunset car drives with friends

Every morning at 5:05 am, I stare at my reflection in the mirror when I wake up. It is sometimes a glance, but there is so much I see. Some days, I see someone ready to face whatever the day brings, excited to practice to push myself or learn a unique topic in class. On other days, I see someone who is sleep-deprived and stressed, too caught up on daunting tasks or future plans. These phases are ones that many face throughout their college years and beyond—the feelings of passion, drive, and eagerness, but also self-doubt, resentment, and fear. I, too, have recently felt many different emotions nearing the final stretch of my second semester as a sophomore, edging closer to being halfway through college and closer to the real world. 

I recently had a conversation with a friend of mine who is nearing the last semester in college as a senior. She’s soon facing graduation and the start of her job working with a startup in a new city halfway across the country. Talking to her made me realize it is a frightening future to face the unknown, leaving behind what is known as a student to face all the world has to bring as a twenty-something adult, but also full of possibilities and excitement. She says it is a new path she’s ready and eager to begin. It is the mindset I admire and always strive to attain—the ability to seize the moment in a way that is most beneficial to my growth in all aspects of life. 

Creating the best version of yourself comes with various methods and philosophies, each valid and helpful in its own way. Doing a quick search online would come up with an overwhelming amount of information, such as “read more,” “be more physically active,” or “practice kindness.” As someone who uses all of these techniques and sometimes fails, I know  there is something crucial about setting your intentions and mindset, focusing on yourself, and your “why.” There will be voices providing information on the best way to attain your goals or aspirations, but the most important voice to listen to is yours. 

I have slowly learned the necessity of being in tune with your body and emotions. There are long days where practice would be particularly strenuous on both my mind and body, and I would have a full day of three to four classes in a row. On these days, though it sometimes feels unproductive to take time for myself to decompress instead of checking tasks off my list, it would benefit me in the long run. The next day, I almost always feel more energized and eager to attack the day. Listening to my body’s needs has made me better at reevaluating and reflecting on my day and my emotions at the end of the day. If I’m feeling drained and irritated, I can acknowledge possible stressors and take small steps, such as a mindset shift, in tackling these obstacles. 

Throughout it all, always remember to look at the bigger picture. Next time you are outside walking to class or around your peers in class, take a second to recognize how much gratitude and passion there is in all that you do. Knowing this will launch you into whatever life has in store for you next, ready to face setbacks and successes with the best version of yourself you have in the moment.


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By Lecia Sun

Lecia is a student at Tufts University studying Classics and World Literature. When she is not reading, she can be found attempting the New York Times Games, trying out a new creative hobby, and dreaming about her next great bake. 


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.


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Nothing is Certain Except for Taxes and Rude Professors: How to Survive Power-Hungry Teachers

Friday, April 5th, 2024

Most people come to college looking to diversify their skill set and dive head-first into their chosen fields. But unfortunately, not every professor has the same intentions when teaching their students. Some of them genuinely care about nurturing young minds to be the next generation of talent in their fields. Some of them are mostly there to further their careers but still try to put as much care as they can into the work they do. But unfortunately, many of them are there to fill whatever powerless void is troubling them in their personal lives and forget the fact that a student-professor relationship goes both ways. This results in teachers taking out unnecessary anger on students, and searching for whatever time and place they can exert their power over their students. 

My freshman year I had a professor who saw potential in my writing talent, but his recognition of my talent made him feel like he had the right to correct my wrongs in whichever way he saw fit. He never missed an opportunity to harshly critique my work in front of the class, suggest changes that completely misinterpreted my vision, and argue back and forth with me during class discussions. This constant ridicule made me feel anxious to go to class, as I was afraid of having my feelings hurt by this professor. The anxiety seeped into my self-confidence, and I started to blame myself for feeling this way. I began to feel that I wasn’t tough enough and that it was my fault for taking things too personally. 

This anxiety and lack of self-confidence began to affect my personal life. My friends started to notice as I became quieter and more nervous in my day-to-day interactions. One day, a friend of mine brought up my change in attitude, and I opened up to them about how I’d been feeling nervous in this class, and how it was making me second-guess myself and the work I produced. 

As I talked it out with them, I realized that it wasn’t me who was the problem; it was him. My friend pointed out that this professor saw both my talent and vulnerability, and used this sweet spot to exert power over me under the guise of helping me. Coming to this conclusion was so important, it helped me contextualize his actions and reframe the situation for myself. I wasn’t the weak and unconfident one, he was. There was nothing I could ever do that would please him, and ease my anxiety. His recognition of my talent to a lot of valuable feedback and advice on my work, but it also led to a lot of emotional turmoil and stress.

Through dealing with this experience, I learned a few tips about how to deal with professors who might not always have the best intentions. The first is to remember your worth. Chances are you’re gonna get critiques on your work, and sometimes they’ll be harsh. Either way, the work you do is still valuable and special. Don’t let anyone take that away from you. Constantly reminding yourself of your worth ensures that you can’t let anyone take it away from you. 

My second tip is to use your voice. I know it’s scary standing up to authority figures, but don’t let yourself be silenced in fear. It’s worth it to set up a one-on-one meeting with your professor to voice your concerns, as maybe they’re unaware of their behavior and you could help them change your mind. My anxiety steered me away from talking to my professor in person, so at the end of my semester during course evaluations, I wrote a letter detailing my feelings toward this professor’s behavior. I knew the evaluations would be read by both the professor and the administrator above him, and that my words would actually be heard and considered this way. If you’re worried about talking to them directly like I was, try sending an email, or setting up a meeting with an office on campus that can help facilitate a productive conversation and safe conversation. On my campus, the Office of Student Success offers services like this, research to see if your school has something similar that could help you. Whatever it is you have to do, if you think you’d feel better by speaking up about it you should do everything in your power to do so. 

My third and last tip is–of course– to take care of yourself. Take a walk after class to clear your mind if you’re upset or anxious. Make it a habit to treat yourself with your favorite snack or candy after each class so you have something to look forward to at the end. If you can, take a mental health day from the class and do something to relieve your stress. At the end of the day what’s important is your mental and physical well-being. As a busy college student, you have to do everything in your power to make sure you’re feeling your best. At the end of the day, this experience taught me to never forget my worth and to not let any way affect my confidence. 

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By Sidnie Paisley Thomas

Sidnie is a Sophomore at Emerson College in Boston studying creative writing and post-colonial literature. In her free time, you can find her hitting up her local thrift store, playing her favorite records, or reading a new book.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015


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PRE-SHOW SURVIVAL AND TIME KILLER

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2024

The Ethics of Coming Early

Come early or else you’ll be watching a fragment of the show on the TV monitors until an usher can sneak you in at the appropriate time.

 

Because that would do the audience a favor. If they stand up and you cause a disruption down the aisle, they would lose sight of plot points or lyrics. Like movies screens, theatre doesn’t have a rewind or pause feature.

 

Outside the theatre

House does not open until 30 minutes before the show. You’ll often see a long line of people outside with their tickets. You could wait there and just read your cell phone. But personally, I like to go take a stroll around New York and not stray too far and get the blood pumping.

 

If you have your ticket in hand, just go for a stroll around the Time Square area rather than stand in line and get your blood pumping. If it’s winter, go look around one of the stores and food places.

 

Go see some street performers. Tip them a little if possible.

 

Eat a light snack beforehand to staunch hunger pangs. The Walgreens on 42nd would be good. No one wants to feel peckish during a performance.

 

Scan for the stage door if you’re interesting in meeting the performers for autographs post-show. You’ll want to map out where to run post-show.

Getting In the Theatre

 

If your ticket is reserved, go within the 30 minutes and you’ll be in the theatre.

 

If you’re picking up your ticket at the box, do so around house opening so you won’t have to wait around long.

In the theatre house

Have your purse or bag open so security can do a quick check. It also makes security’s job quicker for them and the person behind you in line.

 

If you’re lucky, there’s an outlet in the sitting rooms. Plug in your cell phone. Most theatres have  free Wifi. Ten minutes before the show.

 

Read your Playbill, take a look at the actors names. Read about their work history. You might find delicious trivia about them. betcom giriş

But what if I’m late?

Once the show time and date has passed, it has passed. Some theatres have a past date policy. On the day you’re free to see a make-up show, call up the theatre or related ticket seller. Keep the old ticket, or else, it is declared a “total loss.”

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Knowledge is Power: Keeping Yourself On Track in The Face of Distraction

Thursday, March 28th, 2024

For many people, one of the most enticing aspects of college is social freedom. Coming out of high school where parental supervision and lack of freedom limited your fun, college feels like a whole new world where you can do whatever you want, whenever you want. Parties, dates, and on-campus activities may draw your attention away from your classwork and responsibilities. While it’s important to enjoy yourself, it’s equally important to find balance. Going out and having fun is an important part of self-care, but so is making sure you have time to get everything done.

Tending to your social life is important, especially if you go to a smaller school like me. In a place where everyone knows each other, it’s in your best interest to open yourself up to new social experiences, and no matter the size of the school you attend it’s important to be a part of the community. But it’s also important to remember your limits and draw boundaries about things you don’t want to do. Creating boundaries around socializing is something I have to do quite often since a lot of the friends I have right now are very social. They love going out and are always inviting me to go out with them. As more of an introvert, I prefer to spend my weekends inside relaxing, but I understand the importance of staying social and going out, so I try to do it every once in a while. At the beginning of this semester, every weekend my friends would convince me to go out to different parties and events with them. At first, I was having fun, so when they kept asking again and again I kept saying yes. After about a month of this, I was absolutely exhausted. All the late nights on the weekends did not leave me rested enough for the long week, and countless social interactions left me emotionally drained.

My short-lived social era taught me that while I can find enjoyment in socializing, balance is what’s important. I need to make sure I have time to get my work done and be rested enough to balance all my challenges during the week. One way that I did this was by setting clear boundaries with friends. I’d establish that I could only go out one night of the weekend, and I would refuse to go out if I wasn’t feeling up to it. I also set boundaries with myself. I created a rule that if I had more than two assignments due that next week, I wasn’t allowed to go out unless I had done a significant amount of work on them. Rules like these kept me on track when I desired to go out even if it wasn’t in my best interest that weekend. 

There are two important things to remember, the first being the reason that you’re at college. You came to learn and grow as both a student and a person, but primarily you’re there to go to class and learn. When balancing these two things, your investment in your education has to come first. The second thing is taking care of yourself. You have to think about the ways that you can best nurture yourself during the semester to ensure you can balance both your social and academic life.

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By Sidnie Paisley Thomas

Sidnie is a Sophomore at Emerson College in Boston studying creative writing and post-colonial literature. In her free time, you can find her hitting up her local thrift store, playing her favorite records, or reading a new book.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015


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On Finding Purpose

Thursday, March 28th, 2024
Calm sunset moments from my boathouse!

Often, I face this looming question of what I am doing right now as a student and how it impacts me in the long run. It is a challenging issue to tackle that borders on the conversation of imposter syndrome, feeling burnt out, wondering if anything you do is enough, and so much more doubt and scrutiny.

It is easy to compare yourself to others, especially when you see others succeed while sometimes feeling stagnant. You become harsh on yourself, holding yourself to higher standards you may not have on others. There is always a question or a fear that your actions will not matter as the future is unpredictable, and perhaps your life is one big mystery. But I’ve recently come across this idea in one of my classes from a French philosopher, Simone Weil, in her book Gravity and Grace, who conceptualized and helped me reason about this difficult struggle of facing life’s challenges. Weil writes, “I also am other than what I imagine myself to be. To know this is forgiveness.” In simple terms, I see this quote as the idea that there is an image of yourself in your mind that you have created. This imaginary self is different from your actual being, who you put out into the world, and to truly understand the difference means to be kind to yourself and accepting of this fact.

Relating to finding purpose, it is easy to be caught up in the motions of perhaps working on your next assignment or trying to find your next summer job. You may have an image of an ambitious, successful student with a 4.0 while juggling being president of a club and working a part-time job. These attributes are great to strive for, but you may have yet to attain all of these goals or fully grasp what you want to do during college or post-grad life. Weil’s quote, and I’ve genuinely come to believe, is that it is essential to remember that the person you thought you were or are hoping to become is not your current self, which is okay. 

On my team, there has been discussion on working through and trusting the process. On paper, our end goal, the pinnacle of our season, would be winning our events at our spring championship races. Whether we win or lose our races will not determine the work I and many others have put into our training and purpose on the team. The idea of winning is “other than” the reality of where I am in my rowing career and is merely part of the journey. It comes in the form of pushing past obstacles and self-doubt on the journey, knowing I am doing everything I can now. To know this is to be a winner. There has been a mindset shift that perhaps it is not about the result but, instead, the journey, and that truly is something I would rather have defined myself and my purpose than anything else.

With this anecdote in mind, I want to stress the importance of trust, care, and understanding. These aspects are not something that will come naturally. Working through all that school and life are pushing at you will strengthen your resilience and dedication to your purpose, allowing you to look back fondly on all the work you have put in and be excited about the next chapter.


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By Lecia Sun

Lecia is a student at Tufts University studying Classics and World Literature. When she is not reading, she can be found attempting the New York Times Games, trying out a new creative hobby, and dreaming about her next great bake. 


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.


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On Finding Balance

Thursday, March 21st, 2024
Sitting outside after class in the spring

Experiencing college life forces students to reassess their priorities and what they choose to spend their energy on. There is a newfound independence to this lifestyle, with hopes of meeting academic and personal goals, but there is also a large amount of uncertainty that comes with change. In this new stage in life, finding balance is the key to reaching your milestones. By doing so, it will be easier to focus on what we need to do or want to do in the moment, staying present without worries about the future or past.

The definition of what a balanced lifestyle means varies from individual. It comes with an understanding of one’s priorities and values and what truly makes them happy. It may take the form of limiting iPhone screen time to 1-2 hours a day, reading for 15 minutes before bed, or grabbing lunch with your friends at an off-campus restaurant. Whatever the form may take, there are always trade-offs with tasks that may seem burdensome or necessary to complete, such as that one problem set you’ve been pushing off that’s due at the end of the week or last week’s laundry and cleaning. Counteracting the feelings of stress and anxiety with activities that make you calm, joyous, and energized is the end result of a balanced lifestyle.

Going out to lunch with friends at a restaurant near campus

A balanced lifestyle for me means giving myself moments of calm and happiness when life becomes overwhelming. It appears when I’m winding down after a stressful day, chatting with my roommate about what we accomplished during the day, when I have time to work on my passion projects, or when I’m eating dinner with my friends and catching up on our days. When I’m experiencing these moments of being present, I know there will always be some task I need to do, but it is not as pressing as the present. Experiencing these moments will come naturally with time as you let yourself leave behind any stress in the past and focus on your moment. It helps to give yourself kind reminders, understanding where you are now and giving yourself the opportunity to breathe and focus on yourself. 

Knowing when to say no to favors, change in plans, or any other external factors is sometimes difficult. Putting up these boundaries is necessary for shaping your needs and what you need to actively succeed and pursue your goals. Finding balance connects with creating schedules, prioritizing, and learning what suits your individual needs. Sometimes, life happens and you may spend too much time studying for an exam, taking a nap, or working out. Unexpected changes in your schedule may arise, and you cannot fight them. Despite these challenges, remaining flexible and focused on what matters to you will find a way to be successful and balanced for you. 


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By Lecia Sun

Lecia is a student at Tufts University studying Classics and World Literature. When she is not reading, she can be found attempting the New York Times Games, trying out a new creative hobby, and dreaming about her next great bake. 


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Not All Who Wander Are Lost: The Importance of Prioritizing Walking in Self-Care

Wednesday, March 20th, 2024

All of my blog posts so far revolve around how to insert healthy self-care habits into your already existing routine, but it’s also important to allocate time in your day for self-care. As a college student, you’re constantly being pulled in many different directions, and while everything you dedicate yourself to in your busy schedule is important, taking care of yourself is even more so. As I’ve said before, you can’t devote yourself to anything if your body and mind aren’t properly taken care of. Ensuring a productive and well-rounded semester always starts with self-care. 

A picture I took on a walk a few weeks ago

One of my favorite ways to prioritize both my mental and physical health is taking walks. Walking has been proven to be an easy way to get exercise, increase your heart rate, and improve physical fitness, without extra stress on the body. But physical benefits aside, I feel the most beneficial part of walking is on my mental health. Balancing a busy face paced schedule is bound to cause stress and sometimes even anxiety. Sometimes, when I have a lot on my plate, I’ll get caught up in my head trying to think about all of it all at once. Juggling school, work, and extra-curriculars all at the same time can easily become overwhelming. In trying to organize my time to create the most productive schedule for the week, I end up feeling anxious and stuck, unable to do anything. The best solution to this for me is going on a walk, I’m able to clear my head and think about things in a more calm and organized manner. 

Making time for frequent walks can also help manage your baseline stress levels. Once or twice a week, I try to go on a walk by myself, it helps me feel more grounded and improves my general mood. I try not to set limits on how long or where I walk, so I can do whatever my mind needs in that moment. Sometimes I wear my headphones and listen to my favorite music, which helps when I’m feeling down or sad. Other times I decide to leave my headphones at home and listen to the sounds of the city around me. This helps when I’m feeling anxious and want to be more in touch with myself. Depending on the mood I’m in I go to the park, or I’ll stay on a busier street, whatever I feel will help my mood. Either way, by the end of the walk I usually feel happier and ready to take on whatever challenges I’m facing. 

Walking is also a great way to connect with friends and family during a busy schedule. If you and your friends only have a limited amount of time to see each other, going on a short walk and exploring the area is a fun way to make the most of your time. Also on walks, you can stay in touch with family who are far away by giving them a call as you’re on your stroll. However or wherever you decide to walk, it is worth taking the time out of your day to do it. It’s a fun and easy way to take care of yourself that pays off in the long run.

Enjoy 20% off at The Maharaja with this coupon!

By Sidnie Paisley Thomas

Sidnie is a Sophomore at Emerson College in Boston studying creative writing and post-colonial literature. In her free time, you can find her hitting up her local thrift store, playing her favorite records, or reading a new book.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.


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On Finding Passion

Wednesday, March 13th, 2024

I did not set out to write a how-to guide on “how to find your passion” because the journey of cultivating a college student’s passions amidst a whirlwind of life changes and discoveries is complicated enough. There were moments when I was asked what my passions were, and I was at a loss for words. It was not because I did not have anything I did that brought me joy, but because the act of condensing the multitude of interactions, activities, and relationships into a few words was not simple to me.

I have heard about some exciting passions in college, such as running a small clothing business or working on a radio show, and the obvious answers I would have said, such as “reading” or “baking,” feel as if they do not measure up to the high standards of people’s passions. I’ve understood that my passions or others do not define my worth or identity as a college student and creative person. There is a tendency to equate passion to activities people do in their spare time, but there is more to be said about committing to these passions and having the right mindset.

Rowing in a single with my teammates on a lovely spring morning

Beyond defining passions as the act of doing something you love, it is a state of being. Students do not need to be doing an activity to find passion or to be passionate; instead, students can focus on remaining present in the moment. Whether it is attending a club meeting or going on a walk outside, any undertaking made with intention and active choice is related to passions. The simplest and easiest way of achieving this state is by joining clubs and other groups that share similar interests. The other students you meet in these groups could lead to insights into their passions to gain inspiration or new perspectives on what you want your college life to be composed of. 

Baking with my friend for Valentine’s Day

I have also found that actively taking classes that interest me is more rewarding than taking a class for the ease of getting a good grade or filling up a major requirement. I stay more engaged in my class discussions and am eager to learn another topic that will pique my interest in other fields and activities.

During my first year, I decided to take an entrepreneurship class as an elective rather than a class to satisfy my math requirement. It was a class I took at the right time in my life, as it opened up the world of entrepreneurship for social impact and the fascinating companies people have launched. The entrepreneurship class became my favorite class from that semester because of the topics such as creating a vision, finding a venture, and understanding the vitality and viability of a project. The lessons I learned from my class became applicable to my student life and career goals, pushing me to become a better public speaker and inspiring me on career possibilities from a simple idea. I could not have developed these skills and direction by taking Calculus or any other required class. Rather than looking for classes that fit a standard mold, look for inspiring and exciting classes, and you may be surprised. 

Attending an Harvard iLab talk for my entrepreneurship class

I learned that my true drive is rooted in curiosity. Finding your “why” is the first step in recognizing your calling and taking the initial steps to attain any goal. College is a time to explore what calls to you and your interests, anything that adheres to what you are truly passionate about. It may seem daunting initially with a plethora of experiences you may want to face, but what you will eventually land on will result from understanding yourself and your student’s needs. 


A place I love to go to find products for self-care and relaxation! Use this 10% off coupon to refresh your student life in Boston.

By Lecia Sun

Lecia is a student at Tufts University studying Classics and World Literature. When she is not reading, she can be found attempting the New York Times Games, trying out a new creative hobby, and dreaming about her next great bake. 


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Early Bird Gets The Worm: How to Utilize Your Mornings For A Brighter Day

Wednesday, March 13th, 2024

To most college students, waking up early seems like a catastrophe. I’ve had my fair share of doing everything in my power to dodge 8 am classes during registration and being late to early morning shifts because I slept in. But if you’re having trouble managing your time during the day, taking advantage of the time before your day starts may be beneficial to you. 

A beautiful Boston sunrise.

During my freshman year, I had trouble finding time in the day to do everything I needed to. Balancing school, work, and dance, I only had so many free hours in the day to get my work done. At the time my classes started around 11 or 12, and afterward, I always had work or dance practice. By the end of the day, I was exhausted, but still had loads of schoolwork to do before I could go to bed. This cycle quickly wore me out, and soon I had to start thinking of other ways to make my days productive. At first, I tried staying up late at night and sleeping later in the day. I found this only made me less productive since forcing myself to stay up late usually resulted in me falling asleep at my desk. I tried to find time in the middle of the day between classes and shifts, but it was never enough. I’d always have enough time to start assignments but never finish them. The only time left was the morning, and since my classes started around noon, in theory, I could wake up an hour or two earlier. The last thing I wanted to do was to force myself up to work, but I thought I would at least give it a try and see if I could fit in some work before my busy days even started. 

At first, it was difficult. Some days I would shut the early alarms off and roll over for more sleep, others I would drag myself out of bed as much as I could, but give up once I made it to my desk. Through a combination of setting 2 to 3 alarms each day and getting to bed earlier at night, I was slowly able to start waking up on time. After getting over the initial hump of waking up early, I started getting into the groove of working in the morning. I found that I was more productive at the start of the day, and had an easier time staying focused on the task at hand. It also made me feel more accomplished when I woke up and worked in the morning. Before noon, I had already checked a few things off my to-do list which gave me confidence. Another perk of getting an early start is that I’d come home with little or no work to do in the evening, and I’d be able to relax and go to sleep instead of pushing myself to keep working in exhaustion. 

When you’re struggling with productivity, the most important thing to do is to put yourself first. Think about the times of day when you feel most energized and productive, but also think about times you had never considered before. Getting up early seemed impossible to me at first, but once I started doing it it completely changed how I structured my day and got my work done. Think about times of the day you’ve ignored in the past and ask yourself how you can utilize them for a brighter day!

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By Sidnie Paisley Thomas

Sidnie is a Sophomore at Emerson College in Boston studying creative writing and post-colonial literature. In her free time, you can find her hitting up her local thrift store, playing her favorite records, or reading a new book.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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