Archive for June, 2024

Finding Safety In Your Situation

Thursday, June 13th, 2024

Planting my feet on Columbia University’s campus for the first time is an experience I will never forget. Before me was an oasis of grand buildings decorated with ancient names like Homer or Herodotus that I’d never heard before. Like many college freshmen in New York City, I was moving to a new place with what seemed like the entire world sprawled out before me. That feeling can be exhilarating at times, but daunting during others. Between all of the new faces, foods, and experiences you encounter, creating a community for yourself is a must when it comes to maintaining health and even sanity. At this pivotal moment in one’s life it’s crucial to find safety in your situation. 

A photo of Butler library, showing the engravings of Homer and Herodotus.
Taken on 35mm film.

Honestly, Columbia’s makeup inherently discourages a sense of community: Tucked away in Morningside Heights, the campus removes itself from the hustle and bustle of Midtown, Downtown, and even its neighboring Harlem community. Beyond physical barriers like gates, the Ivy League university maintains its competitive nature. I’ve had countless conversations with fellow classmates who complain of the competition to do well in class. In addition to NYC’s toxic “hustle culture”, Columbia students also experience the pressures of the classroom. This especially applies to students interested in the STEM field, where professors often limit the amount of “A” letter grades they give per section. This can lead to tense relationships between students and classmates, perpetuating an “every man for himself” mindset. Instead of cultivating a community of students that uplift each other, this culture can incite gatekeeping and standoffish attitudes. In my opinion, this is counterintuitive to the nature of a university. This is especially disappointing as Columbia boasts of its location at the intersection of thousands of different cultures and people. Columbia doesn’t always encourage a culture of community, but there is still opportunity for the student to engage with their surroundings! It would be a shame to close oneself off from all that the university has to offer socially, geographically, and intellectually. 

Though it may feel easy to shy away from the whirlwind of life that bustles outside of your dorm room, I argue that you have to intentionally form a safe space for yourself in college. The first few weeks of freshman year are incredibly formative. It’s such a beautiful time of life where most people have no expectations, no friends, and no curfew. Everyone is so open to meeting new people and trying new things. It’s important to lean into this social spirit that possesses everyone at the beginning of the year. The end goal isn’t to make lifelong friends, it’s simply helpful to have people to say “hi” to or invite out for adventures in the city. When you maintain a friendly and open mindset you’re fostering a more secure environment for yourself, and for the general community. Through this mindset, we can discard the idea that one must fail a class for another to pass it. While college is an inherently individualized experience, that doesn’t mean we have to face it alone. 

Forming circles of people with similar interests or characteristics are always a great place to start. Basic commonalities were instrumental in forming new friendships. For me, I was able to connect with other students who had just moved from California to New York. These friendships provided an outlet for me to express my homesickness to someone who understood what I was going through. At the same time, I was also learning more about new people and cultures. Most importantly, we were able to support each other during one of the biggest transitions of our lives through the things we had in common. 

A group photo of some of the friends I made freshman year.
Taken on 35mm film.

I can’t sit here and tell you to hunt down all of the people from your home state on the move-in day. What I’m suggesting is to start with what you know. Whether it be where you’re from, who you want to become, or how you got here, finding friends through basic commonalities is the kickstarter for maintaining sanity at college for the first time.


By Thomas Stewart

Thomas currently attends Columbia University and plans to double major in creative writing and human rights. At Columbia Thomas is a staff writer for the City News section of the Columbia Daily Spectator, where he publishes articles that concern the West Harlem community. In his free time, you can find him practicing music or trying new vegetarian recipes


Use this 10% off coupon for an more private dining experience with friends at Kyuramen. It’s walking distance from Columbia too!

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

When Campus Food Doesn’t Cut It

Wednesday, June 12th, 2024

Picture this: it’s a Sunday afternoon. Your stomach is grumbling. Your head is spinning. You ask yourself: “Where am I going to get my next meal?” You sift through your mental Rolodex of campus food options and your heart and stomach sink in sickening tandem. You, anguished student, come to a conclusion: “I don’t want any of this.”

As students confined to greasy or undercooked campus food, we must explore the options of buying and cooking your own food. We must venture outside the iron gates to a local grocery store!

There are three things to take into consideration when choosing where to shop: price, location, and food quality. The first, and arguably most important, is price. Most of us students can’t break the bank whenever we’re craving some non-campus food, especially those living in New York City. When everything inexplicably costs $30, affordable options are a must. The second is location. While we all would like to think we’re able to lug a heavy bag of groceries a mile home, we should be careful not to get caught in our own hubris. The third is food quality. Being cognizant of the freshness of the food you buy might save you a bout of stomach trouble!

For this chapter, I’ve asked my friends, roommates, and fellow grocery-shoppers on a student’s budget: where should I buy my groceries?

The most popular choice is Modern Market, at 2385 Arthur Ave. Modern Market is my personal favorite for its fresh produce and convenient location. While it’s on the more expensive side, I’m a firm believer that sometimes it’s worth it to splurge on quality fall fruits, spring veggies, winter legumes, etc.

Modern Market is situated between 186th and 187th in a particularly lush block of Arthur Ave.
Image credit: yelp.com

Those who recommended Fine Fare on 2645 Webster Ave do so most emphatically. Boasting low prices and wide aisles, Fine Fare fans insist that this fine establishment is worth the walk to the other side of the Metro North train tracks. On a personal note, my roommates shop at Fine Fare, and while they return from grocery shopping panting, sweating, and sore, they are never complaining.

Fine Fare has that nostalgic feel that’s worth the walk.
Image credit: marketreportblog.com

If you’re interested in a Fordham-specific option, the Arthur Avenue retail market is definitely the most expensive (costing an AARM and a leg! haha), but has probably the best quality groceries and fresh food available in the immediate area. There are over a dozen vendors peddling their specialties, including but not limited to: fresh fruit, cured meats, coffee, and even cigars! However, given this odd assortment of available goods, I’d argue that the retail market is more of a touristy experience than a reliable grocery spot.

The Arthur Ave retail market really feels like a whole other world.
Image credit: edc.nyc

A final option: getting groceries delivered from Aldi. Some people I know swear by this, saying that it’s affordable, convenient, and good for resisting temptation to buy junk food because you don’t physically see it. If you’re on a specific diet, or if you’re just trying to steer yourself away from Ben & Jerry’s or Tostitos Hint of Lime chips (not speaking from experience or anything), this is a good option. 

However, in the spirit of engaging with one’s community, I can’t in good faith recommend that you ONLY order groceries online from a large chain! It’s important to support local businesses like the ones I mentioned before. Get out there and talk to people—recluses don’t have any fun. So buy your own groceries, like a grown-up!

For a special student discount on groceries near you, check out Uptown Whole Foods!

by Mia Crocco

Mia is a rising junior at Fordham University – Rose Hill studying English and theology. In her free time, Mia enjoys cooking, collaging, and playing the piano and guitar.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

Intro To: Germination

Monday, June 10th, 2024

*Creating your garden in the concrete of the sidewalk. Where there is no space, you have to make your own.*

Every few months, I return to ‘The Garden’. Where my nostrils can finally enjoy a full inhale and I can see the entire sky. My hometown, a small southern-esque town. Too north for the Southerners to fully embrace us, but too south for the Northerners to pay attention. Right in the middle, where it could be awkward, but it’s golden and just right. The people are more polite than we care to notice and the highways go on for too long. It’s too much of nothing at all, but it’s home. When I revisit this place where I’ve planted these roots of mine, the branches of my life ask me in queer amazement, “How is it up there?” “Do you like New York City?” It’s almost as if they forget we’re a mere four hours away, close enough for everyone to see for themselves.

Depending on how close the branch is to the trunk, I either fake a smile or wear my infamous flat lips. But I always pause before I truly answer, because how should I respond? As a middle-class student going to one of the most expensive universities in the country, or as a young black woman in Manhattan. These two seeds are within me, one who allows me to relate to more of my peers, while the other I could never change. Who do they really want to hear from? The pondering lasts only a second before I answer, “It could be better” because I can’t shut out the fact that I am a challenging mix of both.
“How so?” the branches ask.

Well, I can tell you. From figuring out how to wash my curls in a low-pressured dorm room shower, to having conversations with privileged 20-year-old classmates who own a Bitcoin. Allow me to share a few entries of how I made living in New York City as a regular, young black woman somewhat ‘better’. No blog in the world will say it all, but they’ll all say something, and hopefully one of those things is the one you need to hear. Hopefully, my stories can provide a hand to hold when navigating the concrete jungle; and give some water to your roots when they seem harder to grow and find your system. To the black students in Manhattan, where it may be harder to find one another, welcome to Roots in the Concrete Jungle: A Black Girl’s Guide to Manhattan-ing.

Love,
Madison

Image Credit: Water Yourself 1″ Poster for Sale by crohnschronicle | Redbubble
Share

Something for Everyone: Finding Your Music Genre

Monday, June 10th, 2024

Whether you’ve been a music connoisseur since you were young or you’ve only recently started exploring and refining your taste, the journey to find your genre is almost as tenuous as choosing a college. Finding the one or multiple genres that appeal most to you can be helpful in discerning which concerts and events to attend, but also allows you to narrow down your hunt for new artists. While most of us listen to a whole range of genres every single day, shifting effortlessly from hip-hop to pop to country, it can be a daunting process to find your favorites. With unlimited access at our fingertips, how do you establish a unique music taste? 

Start with the classics. 

It’s important to listen to a whole range of genres before deciding what you do or don’t like. A good place to start is finding the classics of whichever genre you intend to explore. For example, if you’re trying to get into hip-hop and don’t know where to start, Spotify’s “Gold School” playlist is a great introduction. Utilizing your music platform’s curated playlists is great tool, even if you don’t have a music subscription, you can easily search YouTube for “hip-hop classics.” This exploration will likely be the most time-consuming part of your journey, however, most music lovers know that the hunt for a great artists is fulfilling t. Listening to the classics of each genre can be a great introduction, but don’t be shy in asking ask friends for recommendations. 

Use streaming platforms to your advantage. 

As previously mentioned, streaming platforms, most notably Spotify, provide excellent curation and opportunities to discover new music. Their algorithms are designed to recommend new music for you based upon your previous listening and provide a range of playlists for every genre, time period, and mood. You can even search a range of terms such as “Summer Mix” or “Morning Mix” to find curated playlists based on your recent listening. Apple Music also has a similar feature, though not as extensive as Spotify’s, the platform provides personalized playlists such as “New Music,” “Favorites,” and “Chill.” 

Spotify’s curated “Chill Morning Mix” for me

Experience it live. 

Experiencing music live is an essential part of supporting the artists you’re exploring, and it provides an immersive experience. Live music can also be affordable and accessible if you are exploring smaller artists based in your city. Attending these events is a way to create memories and potentially find a community with aligned interests. The collective experience of attending concerts is crucial to appreciating the genres that you are streaming, and it might introduce you to something new. 

Sit down and listen. 

Finally, the most time-consuming but gratifying part of this journey is sitting down and listening. Take the time to explore different artists and listen to their discography all the way through. It may take weeks to even scratch the surface of what you’re looking for, but as you listen more, the more your streaming platform can work alongside you to produce better recommendations. Trust the recommendations of Spotify’s “Discover Weekly,” and always be open to listening to something new. Spending the time and energy to explore genres will ultimately be rewarding for your musical journey. 

While I can only speak to my own experiences, these were the four tips I found most helpful as I explored my music taste through high school and college. If you spend half of your life with headphones on, trust me, finding songs you love is important. 


Need a study break? Enjoy $5 off when you join Pokeworks rewards!

Georgie Fleming is a recent graduate of Fordham University with a BA in Communications and French and Francophone Studies. While at Fordham, she frequently published articles in a music publication and worked as a barista. She grew up in Newport, Rhode Island. She spends her free time going to the beach, reading, and baking. 


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  


At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

Confessions of a People-Pleaser: On Advocating for your Needs and Boundaries

Monday, June 10th, 2024

There is no such a thing as someone with no needs and no boundaries. I used to believe I had none or at least no right to my own boundaries because I was placed in a role of mostly serving others. Specifically, many women are raised to believe this about themselves. And yet, many western cultures have this expectation that women still need to be these boss women with unbreakable spirits. I couldn’t reconcile these expectations before the time came for me to participate in a college lecture or start my first internship. 

I knew I had to dig deep within myself to find out why I had found it so challenging not to sacrifice myself for the needs of other people. To believe that I didn’t deserve to be listened to, helped, or have my identity affirmed as friendship coach Danielle Bayard Jackson loves to say. This was clearly impacting the quality of relationships I had with potential friends, my coworkers, family, and supervisors. And it was only blinding me from the potential I had of fulfilling my dreams and of living the kind of life I desired in the end. 

I mostly talk about boundary-setting with family in the second chapter of my ebook; but I would like to expand this conversation to include friends. Family is more or less our first introduction to how relationships are formed and how people view us. Some of us may have more chaotic families than others and follow scripts that strip us all of our autonomy, but they nevertheless serve as a blueprint for our friendships and other relationships important to us. 

As the eldest daughter in my family with two younger brothers, I was raised to constantly look after others, listen to their troubles, be available for when others had urgent matters to be taken care of, and always be open to visiting and being visited by other extended family members, even when the relationship was clearly one-sided. I grew accustomed to turning to journals and talking to myself to keep me away from the true feelings dying inside of me. And to still feel alive after a busy day of being a machine.

I’ll provide an example of a time I should have set boundaries with a “friend” in college. One woman approached me as I was waiting to meet with my advisor in the hallway. She seemed like the kind of person who was over-eager to talk to any new person she could find. I was surprised that she had ended up in my English Critical Theory class. From that point on, she always sat next to me, always asked me questions when the professor was speaking, called my phone several times in a row after class hours, and even plagiarized parts of an essay of mine. What looked like flattery in the beginning started to look more and more like obsession and jealousy (and she admitted to being jealous too). I should have told her that I clearly didn’t see her as a friend like she did. I should have let her know that she was exhausting me. I needed space, but because of the scripts I was fed as a eldest daughter, I willfully gave myself away to energy vampires like her.

Never been the most comfortable in front of a camera.

This was the script I carried with me into my young adulthood. I second-guessed my intellect during college lectures, which stopped me from participating. I felt guilty from wanting to lean on someone when I felt down because my supposed friends’ problems seemed more important, and I felt ashamed for ever using my free time because it was time I could have used to do more work at home or at the office. We all play roles in every aspect of our lives, but we have to decide what roles are depriving us of our humanity. How can we all get what we need without sacrificing ourselves and/or other people? That is my ultimate question. 

It requires a lonely journey to arrive at the answer simply because we live in a world that encourages us to treat each other like slot machines and less like humans. We all have a responsibility to show up for those we care about and hold them accountable when our boundaries have been crossed. Communicate openly and honestly, respect each other’s right to personal space, and learn the art of self-reliance because that will surely come in handy. It first starts with acknowledging we need things from others and learning to fulfill those needs in a healthy way.


Give yourself a relaxing “Me Day” with this coupon!

By Daeli Vargas

Daeli is a recent graduate from the City College of New York with a BA in English and a publishing certificate. She is from the Bronx and is very passionate about all things literary. She hopes one day to publish many books of her own and share her passions worldwide.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

Confessions of a “Golden Child”

Thursday, June 6th, 2024

You have probably heard about us. The children who behave just as expected—when the expectations are high—and the ones the family brags about. We are known as the “Golden Child” and can do nothing but shine.

Since birth, I was expected to be obedient, the treasure my parents could show the world and say, “She’s such a good girl; she gives us no trouble.” I was—indeed—so good at it. It was my innate talent. My behavior? Impeccable; my grades? Outstanding; and when my little sister was born, I was expected to be something even bigger than a golden child: a role model. And the gold chain of my success started weighing me down.

The heaviness projected towards the shaping of my personality. I became a people-pleasing, rule-following, perfectionist child who hated herself whenever she made a mistake. My parents often described me as “shy” to excuse my quietness, but the reason for my lack of words was nothing else but fear. Fearfulness and the inevitable anxiety that comes with it filled my days, living terrified of saying the wrong thing or acting the wrong way. Somehow, I had connected my high grades and good manners to my parents’ love; one couldn’t exist without the other.

Image Credit: https://www.choosingtherapy.com/golden-child-syndrome/

On the other hand, my little sister would grow to be as imperfect as she needed to be. She would misbehave and do badly in school. Still, instead of getting my parents’ disapproval—like I thought I would get—they hired tutors, stayed on top of her homework, and showered her with gifts anytime she’d get something higher than a D. Regrettably, this response from my parents planted a seed of resentment. I have always loved my sister, but growing up, I couldn’t help but be upset at the different treatments we got. I failed to see that this also affected her, after all, living while feeling you need to reach your big sister’s standards also creates resentment.

As an adult, I understand my parents didn’t think I needed special attention. I was always so put together, “mature for my age,” and such a good student that my achievements were just as expected of me. My A’s were not as impressive as my sister’s C’s. They didn’t do this on purpose or with bad intentions; my sister deserved all the attention she got. Unfortunately, the effects of this imbalance between us are clear. My sister is now a confident woman who understands her value is not determined by her mistakes, while I am still insecure and believe perfection is the only way to get people to love me. However, since I moved to New York City and away from the need to please my parents, I’m slowly finding my worth beyond my grades.

Finding what I enjoy outside of a classroom

When I got here, I made mistakes, so many mistakes. I misbehaved, revealed, and learned to forgive myself for that. I eventually realized my parents didn’t stop loving me even if I wasn’t their golden child anymore, so I forgave them for making me think that. My sister and I forgave each other and became the best friends we were always supposed to be. Most importantly, I took pride in my academic achievements for the first time in a long time. I always told others that “getting A’s is not something to be proud of” as a defense mechanism because it wasn’t celebrated in my house. For five years, I stopped attending school and concentrated on finding what made me worthy.

Throughout the quest to find my value as a human being, I decided to apply for college and allow myself to enjoy my life as a student. For the first time in a while, my high GPA made me proud because I saw it as the fruit of my efforts and not as a testament to my worth, a reason for others to like me. Sometimes it is still tempting to measure my value against my academic achievements because I am still unlearning many things. It is an ongoing, difficult journey but it is also necessary. To fully embrace my college journey, I must let go of my search for perfection and focus on what being a student is about: learning and connecting.

If you are your parents’ “Golden Child” right now and feel the suffocating burden that inevitably comes with it, I hope you understand soon that you are allowed to make mistakes, that you must aim high for yourself and not others, and that your value goes beyond how bright you shine.


Use this student discount for a delicious burger combo. Vegan option available.

By Roxanna Cardenas

Roxanna is a Venezuelan writer living in New York City. Her works include essays, poetry, screenplays, and short stories. She explores fiction and non-fiction genres, with a special interest in horror and sci-fi. She has an A.A. in Writing and Literature and is working on her B.A. in English with a Creative Writing concentration.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

The “More” That Everyone Needs

Thursday, June 6th, 2024

Big decisions like college commitment can sometimes generate confused or disapproving reactions. Personally, many people from my hometown couldn’t understand the desire to leave my home, the Central Valley, or California at all. Attempts to explain my visions of more changes, discoveries, and experiences were often in vain. My desire to leave home was too complex to express through small talk. Ultimately, it was a feeling that I alone could observe and act upon. Through a frustrating process, I learned to be okay with the fact that not everyone would understand my decision. I had finally convinced myself to chase my dreams, there was no need to prove myself to others.

A photo of myself after my high school graduation. Taken on 35mm film.

In my opinion, appreciating your home is just as necessary as leaving it. These two actions are intrinsically connected; they feed off of each other. Thinking back to my experience leaving California’s Central Valley, I remember feeling conflicted about my departure. My home has nurtured me for the past 17 years, but it had sheltered me from the outside world. Its mountain ranges entrapped me physically and mentally.

A prime example of this entrapment in California was my nit-picky diet. My rotation of meals peaked at a grand total of 5 different foods, usually different variations of bread and cheese. This “5-year-old’s diet” wasn’t based on dietary or allergic restrictions, but rather a psychological barrier that hampered any desire to try new things. Offers of basic foods like chocolate, chicken tenders, or scrambled eggs were immediately declined, leaving no room for consideration or entertainment. I had never deliberately tried those foods before, therefore I didn’t like them: nothing more. Without knowing it, I had developed this instinctive and irrational rejection of trying new things. 

New foods were an obvious example of my mindless rejections in the Central Valley, but in retrospect I notice other instances where I deliberately denied myself growth. Whether it be tasting falafel for the first time, trying on a pair of sneakers “outside my aesthetic”, or even talking to classmates I had never spoken a word to, my mental block prevailed in hindering new experiences. I had cultivated a way of living at home that was satisfactory, but not stimulating. 

For a long time, this life at home was enough for me. To a certain extent, consistency and familiarity is necessary when it comes to growing up. Still, there comes a time where you begin to prod at the edges of your confinement. It might be enough, but you need a “more”. When, how, or why this urge for change happens varies from person to person, for someone else, it might be a conversation that exposes them to their dream job. For me, a college visit to the Ivies instigated my yearning to grow during my sophomore year of high school. Whatever the case may be, it’s important that you react to whatever force is calling to you. Once you understand what you’re drawn to, I urge you to make it a reality.

In the heat of the moment, it can be so hard to stay true to yourself and trust your gut. As I write these words a year after I decided to attend Columbia, I can say with 100% certainty that leaving home was worth it. College offers a universe of new sights, cultures, flavors, emotions, and friends. It offers the “more” that everyone needs. The only catch: you have to take that initial leap of faith to embrace it all. Regardless of whether you have supporters or adversaries, it’s up to you alone to make your dreams a reality.

The final float of the 2023 Macys Thanksgiving Parade.
Taken on 35mm film.

By Thomas Stewart

Thomas currently attends Columbia University and plans to double major in creative writing and human rights. At Columbia Thomas is a staff writer for the City News section of the Columbia Daily Spectator, where he publishes articles that concern the West Harlem community. In his free time, you can find him practicing music or trying new vegetarian recipes.


Need to connect with friends and family after a big move? Faculty can get 25% off of AT&T’s unlimited everything plan with Faculty ID.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

It’s Popular Because It’s Good: Belmont Staples

Wednesday, June 5th, 2024

The Bronx’s Belmont is a neighborhood with myriad cultures, which means its food options are not only incredibly diverse but incredibly delicious. Patrons of the neighborhood are able to enjoy recipes that have been refined for decades, and taste like it too! Students in the area have a couple staple spots, consistently adored and attended for being delicious, reliable, and mostly affordable. Located in the heart of the Bronx’s Little Italy, all of the below staples specialize in Italian fare: specifically pasta, fish, cheese, and meat. However, in this chapter, we’re going to be getting the obvious choices out of the way: are the restaurants students frequent really worth your time?

First off is Enzo’s: THE staple restaurant. Packed with families during Parents’ Weekend, move-in, move-out, Homecoming, and more. Any time parents are in town, their kids (students starved for quality food, unable to justify dropping thirty precious dollars on pasta) beg for Enzo’s. Or at least I definitely do. Their menu boasts pizza, seafood, meat entrees, salads, incredible pasta and sauce, and delicious desserts. Some of my favorite dishes include their Pizza alla Enzo, complete with prosciutto and arugula (one of my favorite combinations), and anything with their signature vodka sauce. Their sauces are so delicious, Enzo’s has blessed the community by making jars of it available to purchase by the door. The southernmost of these staples and thus the farthest from campus, Enzo’s of Arthur Avenue is definitely worth the walk.

Though only opened in 1999, Enzo’s of Arthur Avenue seems like it’s been perfecting its recipes for decades.
Image credit: facebook.com

Next is Michaelangelo’s: Known for its faux-outdoor back patio and Thursday happy hour, Michaelangelo’s is the spot for formals. Though these events can get pricey, it’s almost always worth it. What could be considered a sit-down restaurant by day transforms into an Italian bar-and-grill, complete with music, dancing, and of-age alumni looking for a nostalgic dinner option in their old stomping grounds. One of Arthur Ave’s more affordable Italian restaurants, the food is alright, the drinks are alright, but the fun ambience (namely the 2000s music, lively staff, and the soft lights strung through the entire patio) is what makes Michaelangelo’s a favorite for all students, for all four years. 

Michaelangelo’s jungle-style back patio is the perfect environment to enjoy some affordable Italian food.
Image credit: yelp.com

If you’re feeling a little less formal when you visit Belmont, you can opt for Casa Della Mozzarella on 187th St. Deli on the outside, life-changing sandwich experience on the inside. Casa Della Mozzarella specializes in some of the most divine Italian paninis to ever grace human tastebuds: can’t go wrong with Il Classico, a caprese panini. They also sell standalone cheese and cured meats as well, and as their name would suggest, their mozzarella trumps all on Arthur Avenue.

While Casa Della Mozzarella might seem cramped on the inside, it’s only because it’s got so much to offer: cheese, meat, paninis, you name it!
Image credit: usarestaurants.info

Finally, Pugsley’s Pizza: What looks like a divey pizza spot tucked into a parking lot on 191st Street is an undeniable Fordham institution. Decades of names scrawled on the walls, faded photos with celebrities, and worn seats that were probably once very clean and comfortable all lend themselves to the pizza staple’s slogan: Love is It. While Pugsley’s might not be objectively the best pizza in Belmont, when you walk through that green door, you’re awash with the scent of garlic and the feeling of home.

Armed with armchairs, booths, and a large family-style table, Pugsley’s is the go-to spot for a bit to eat after a late night excursion with friends.
Image credit: usarestaurants.info
If you want to get all done up to go out for a fancy dinner at Pugsley’s, take the D Train to W 90th St for a discounted ‘do!

by Mia Crocco

Mia is a rising junior at Fordham University – Rose Hill studying English and theology. In her free time, Mia enjoys cooking, collaging, and playing the piano and guitar.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

On The Fordham Bubble

Wednesday, June 5th, 2024

Nestled comfortably into the center of the Bronx exists a tree-lined oasis, cut off from the rest of the world. A place where those inside get to enjoy the sounds of birds and church bells instead of cars honking. A place populated by spoiled college students, most of which are unwilling to venture outside its imposing iron gates. This place is none other than Fordham University’s Rose Hill campus.

I’ve been lucky to be a student at Fordham for the past two years, where I’ve been able to take advantage of its beautiful campus and vibrant student life: a plethora of clubs spanning the arts, administration, publishing, academics, and more. There’s plenty to do on campus; I will commend the university for that. However, it would be a disservice to remain behind campus gates. Nicknamed “the Fordham Bubble,” the phenomena causes many students to pathologically stay inside Fordham’s campus, and if they do leave, limit themselves into Lower Manhattan rather than exploring the city. Contrary to the beliefs of many Fordham students, not all of New York is like SoHo or Bushwick or Astoria, neighborhoods frequented by young people in similar demographics to Fordham students: namely, people “escaping” suburbia to enjoy the fast-paced life of the city.

More specifically, Fordham is located in the Belmont neighborhood of the Bronx. Whenever I tell someone I go to school in the Bronx, I usually get this response (especially from older people): “The Bronx is very dangerous. You should really be careful.” Not only is this phrase insulting, it’s also extremely diminutive and completely disregards the diversity of neighborhoods throughout New York City. Even so, while some neighborhoods in the Bronx may be considered “rough” by outsiders, such is not the case for the majority of the Bronx, least of all Belmont. In fact, the area is populated mostly by families because of the many schools nearby: MS 45, PS 74, Theodore Roosevelt High School, and more. A building on Fordham Road even houses 6 specialized schools!

As such, I believe that Fordham’s location in Belmont provides the perfect introduction to New York City. Belmont is home to large Dominican, Italian, and Albanian populations, which allows for incredible food options. Arthur Avenue, arguably the crown jewel of Belmont and the self-professed “real Little Italy,” packs a whopping 29 restaurants into 4 blocks. And that’s not even counting the restaurants on the cross streets! Each restaurant offers a unique experience, even if they’re offering similar food. While many Fordham students do take advantage of community staples like Enzo’s, many businesses in the Bronx don’t get enough love from the students who spend four years adjacent to them. This is why it’s necessary to “pop the Fordham bubble”: expanding our palettes in more ways than one is an excellent way to support local businesses and to engage with our community in a meaningful way, rather than just existing alongside it.

For Fordham students, the D’s Fordham Road station is a community staple as much as any local restaurant.
Image Credit: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/45036064995610335/

In this series, we’ll attack this problem, offering the means to pop the “Fordham bubble” by bringing attention to restaurants, parks, markets, and events that show what not only Belmont but the entire Bronx has to offer. We’re going to learn from the best by dialoguing with members of the Belmont community and hearing about their favorite things to do in the place they call home. We’re going to do a deep-dive into what Arthur Ave is famous for, and we’re going to explore some places that should be famous, too. Belmont is one of my favorite neighborhoods in all of New York because of its ability to offer a bite-sized portion of city life while still maintaining the feeling of a tight-knit community. Without the exhausting hustle-and-bustle of Manhattan, without the finance bros clogging the subways, without the influencers taking selfies in the middle of the street, one can truly appreciate what is, in my opinion, is the most underrated borough in New York City: the Bronx.

Get off campus for a bit and head uptown for delicious hot pot at XW Spicy Hot Pot!

In short, one not only needs to step outside of their comfort zone, they need to reassess the reasons for said comfort zone. This goes for any college student living in an urban area that furrows the brows of their close-minded friends and family: the city is what you make of it, and you’ll never find your new favorite spot if you don’t pop the bubble!


by Mia Crocco

Mia is a rising junior at Fordham University – Rose Hill studying English and theology. In her free time, Mia enjoys cooking, collaging, and playing the piano and guitar.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

A Student’s Secrets to Affordable Entertainment in NYC

Monday, June 3rd, 2024

New York City has been a cultural hub and home to artists across numerous disciplines for most of its history. One of the most exciting parts of NYC is its rich connection to music history and the hoards of artists which are attracted and inspired by the city’s vibrance. Music has always been an important part of my life. In fact, it was an emotional support archor during the pandemic; when creating a playlist for every mood, season, or activity was an ideal way to pass hours at a time. My engagement with live music prior to moving to the city was decently limited due to the inaccessibility of concert stadiums and venues from my small town. Coming to NYC, I could not have predicated that frequenting affordable live music venues would be a large component of my experience. However, it became one of my favorite ways to spend a weekend and become more connected with a sometimes overwhelmingly large city. 

Pretty Sick live at the Bowery Ballroom – November 2022

A brief history of New York music culture: a birthplace of hip hop, punk rock, disco, and new wave. The city is also recognized for the host of genres which it has popularized such as jazz in Harlem, folk in Greenwich Village, and bachata in Washington Heights. New York houses some of the most iconic venues as well, such as the Apollo Theater, Carnegie Hall, and the Lincoln Center for Performing. Later on, I may even discuss how you can visit some of NYC’s iconic venues. It has continuously been a beacon of artistic freedom, inviting innovative creativity and supporting a large community of independent artists. The melting pot of cultures present in New York impact and shape how styles of music have mingled and merged. 

My own experience in New York has largely centered around music culture because it became one of the most accessible ways to find entertainment on the weekends as a college freshman and sophomore searching for under-21 nightlife spots. It can be difficult to find experiences which cater to 18+ audiences in New York despite the multiple universities in the city. Attending live music events became a gateway through which I could experience the city at night and an affordable way to socialize and foster new experiences. To continue nurturing my love for music, I also became involved in the burgeoning music scene at my own university. Fordham’s music community consists of numerous bands which perform on-campus and off in the nearby area and contains many students who go on to pursue music as a full-time career. Attending the performances of student-led bands because a way to meet new people and engage with my university community.

Having live music available within my own neighborhood of Belmont in the Bronx was certainly a privilege, but I still frequented my favorite Manhattan spots often. Overall, music has been a gateway for me to access all that New York has to offer, connect with its rich culture, and maybe even find my own place in an overwhelmingly large city. I want to connect students like myself to these experiences and share tips and tricks for finding affordable entertainment. In the coming chapters, I will both explore my on-campus and off-campus music venue experiences and even include an interview with a Fordham alumni and New York based musician. This will be my ultimate guide to accessing all New York has to offer music-wise including 18+ accessible locations within a student’s budget!


Enjoy 15% off hair services with this special discount for students!


Georgie Fleming is a recent graduate of Fordham University with a BA in Communications and French and Francophone Studies. While at Fordham, she frequently published articles in a music publication and worked as a barista. She grew up in Newport, Rhode Island. She spends her free time going to the beach, reading, and baking.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  


At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share