Posts Tagged ‘college life’

Chapter One: You Could Be a ‘Good Girl’ and a ‘Bad Girl’

Monday, June 17th, 2024

When I first took a step on my college campus, I was terrified. Mostly of myself. Coming from a K-8 Catholic school education and a militaristically run charter high school, I had built a strong “good girl” persona that today I still find myself trying to deconstruct entirely. To my pleasant surprise, college was the right and best place for me to do just that.

As a preteen, I had this idea that I would transform into a completely different woman. A woman with major presence, high-energy, and is unabashedly quirky. All the qualities I think would have been fully-fleshed out before my 20s if I hadn’t been disciplined out of them. I could finally use my 20s to revive that excitable little girl that was always in me but was made small. She often found shelter in free-spirited fictional characters who’d given her (and me) inspiration for a satisfying womanhood. I was excited again to be outside of my home.

As an English major, I was already being taught how to think critically about gender, race, sexual orientation, and even Catholicism to a lesser extent. I peeled back layers of lies and false promises made to me by my parents and by the Church. I thought my parents’ home and the home of worship were places that would offer me belonging and safety, but I only ever felt like I was in constant danger. I was explicitly and implicitly told that the woman I was dying to be wasn’t the right woman and wasn’t the woman I was born to be. So, I became of afraid of her. Afraid of who I would turn out to be.

I have to admit that I often found it easier to learn about critical theory than I did putting it into practice in my everyday life. I was avoiding the reality that I had the experience that showed I wasn’t a little girl anymore, yet I wasn’t owning the “woman” label. And it was just that that I learned—the knowledge and experience that you gain outside college lecture halls matters just as much as on the inside of a college campus; and both can’t really exist without each other.

I grew to think of my college experience as my “bad girl” era. My personal Garden of Eden. It was where I could find so much forbidden fruit (both of the academic kind and of the human kind, if you know what I mean). There is so much hidden about yourself that requires constant discovery and rediscovery. And that is what happened with me; during college, I had realized there were sides to myself and to other people that were almost invisible to me because I had finally been given the space to have conversations that would have been useful to myself as a young girl and most likely for many other young girls too.

Girls just wanna have fun!

It was where I realized I had autonomy and choice, even if I had been raised in a culture that made me believe the opposite. While I had technically taken a women’s studies course in the latter-end of my college journey, I had learned so much about feminism through my other humanities courses. I wasn’t just inspired by these humanities courses but by just being in a space away from the surveillance of my parents at home. Inspired to make certain decisions for myself and even just for myself, as much as that sounded selfish to most around me.

I received a lot of pushback for just exercising my autonomy. For revealing my true opinions on different social and political issues. For furthering myself away from people and activities that I was considered to be culturally and politically obligated to in my childhood and adolescence. I grew up taught to be overly concerned about being moral (or more accurately, looking moral) for the sake of fitting an unrealistic mold made for imperfect humans. Us women and femmes know too well the pressure not to be the “bad girl.” Yet, there will always be something about a woman that makes her a rotten apple.

For me, it was keeping my head too far into my books—my bibliophilia. According to my parents, my love for reading and writing just turned me into an overemotional, self-involved, and distracted daughter. Initially, I thought my knowledge would stand in for morality considering how much importance my parents and general society give education. But then I realized that my parents mostly cared about the grades and social status my education would give them and myself whereas I mostly cared about how I could support myself and others with the knowledge I gained.

In the end, I believe many of us humans, especially women, are more than just completely “good” or completely “bad.” I love words too much to have continued latching onto this extreme form of language into my mid-20s. I prefer to recognize the complexity we all carry in us and that my “bad girl” era college gave me was never really a “bad girl” era. It was more like a me-growing-into-my-womanhood era. I will admit—though—that calling it a “bad girl” era always sounded like fun.


Get your color on with this coupon for the nail salon!

By Daeli Vargas

Daeli is a recent graduate from the City College of New York with a BA in English and a publishing certificate. She is from the Bronx and is very passionate about all things literary. She hopes one day to publish many books of her own and share her passions worldwide.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

Confessions of a People-Pleaser: On Advocating for your Needs and Boundaries

Monday, June 10th, 2024

There is no such a thing as someone with no needs and no boundaries. I used to believe I had none or at least no right to my own boundaries because I was placed in a role of mostly serving others. Specifically, many women are raised to believe this about themselves. And yet, many western cultures have this expectation that women still need to be these boss women with unbreakable spirits. I couldn’t reconcile these expectations before the time came for me to participate in a college lecture or start my first internship. 

I knew I had to dig deep within myself to find out why I had found it so challenging not to sacrifice myself for the needs of other people. To believe that I didn’t deserve to be listened to, helped, or have my identity affirmed as friendship coach Danielle Bayard Jackson loves to say. This was clearly impacting the quality of relationships I had with potential friends, my coworkers, family, and supervisors. And it was only blinding me from the potential I had of fulfilling my dreams and of living the kind of life I desired in the end. 

I mostly talk about boundary-setting with family in the second chapter of my ebook; but I would like to expand this conversation to include friends. Family is more or less our first introduction to how relationships are formed and how people view us. Some of us may have more chaotic families than others and follow scripts that strip us all of our autonomy, but they nevertheless serve as a blueprint for our friendships and other relationships important to us. 

As the eldest daughter in my family with two younger brothers, I was raised to constantly look after others, listen to their troubles, be available for when others had urgent matters to be taken care of, and always be open to visiting and being visited by other extended family members, even when the relationship was clearly one-sided. I grew accustomed to turning to journals and talking to myself to keep me away from the true feelings dying inside of me. And to still feel alive after a busy day of being a machine.

I’ll provide an example of a time I should have set boundaries with a “friend” in college. One woman approached me as I was waiting to meet with my advisor in the hallway. She seemed like the kind of person who was over-eager to talk to any new person she could find. I was surprised that she had ended up in my English Critical Theory class. From that point on, she always sat next to me, always asked me questions when the professor was speaking, called my phone several times in a row after class hours, and even plagiarized parts of an essay of mine. What looked like flattery in the beginning started to look more and more like obsession and jealousy (and she admitted to being jealous too). I should have told her that I clearly didn’t see her as a friend like she did. I should have let her know that she was exhausting me. I needed space, but because of the scripts I was fed as a eldest daughter, I willfully gave myself away to energy vampires like her.

Never been the most comfortable in front of a camera.

This was the script I carried with me into my young adulthood. I second-guessed my intellect during college lectures, which stopped me from participating. I felt guilty from wanting to lean on someone when I felt down because my supposed friends’ problems seemed more important, and I felt ashamed for ever using my free time because it was time I could have used to do more work at home or at the office. We all play roles in every aspect of our lives, but we have to decide what roles are depriving us of our humanity. How can we all get what we need without sacrificing ourselves and/or other people? That is my ultimate question. 

It requires a lonely journey to arrive at the answer simply because we live in a world that encourages us to treat each other like slot machines and less like humans. We all have a responsibility to show up for those we care about and hold them accountable when our boundaries have been crossed. Communicate openly and honestly, respect each other’s right to personal space, and learn the art of self-reliance because that will surely come in handy. It first starts with acknowledging we need things from others and learning to fulfill those needs in a healthy way.


Give yourself a relaxing “Me Day” with this coupon!

By Daeli Vargas

Daeli is a recent graduate from the City College of New York with a BA in English and a publishing certificate. She is from the Bronx and is very passionate about all things literary. She hopes one day to publish many books of her own and share her passions worldwide.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

The “More” That Everyone Needs

Thursday, June 6th, 2024

Big decisions like college commitment can sometimes generate confused or disapproving reactions. Personally, many people from my hometown couldn’t understand the desire to leave my home, the Central Valley, or California at all. Attempts to explain my visions of more changes, discoveries, and experiences were often in vain. My desire to leave home was too complex to express through small talk. Ultimately, it was a feeling that I alone could observe and act upon. Through a frustrating process, I learned to be okay with the fact that not everyone would understand my decision. I had finally convinced myself to chase my dreams, there was no need to prove myself to others.

A photo of myself after my high school graduation. Taken on 35mm film.

In my opinion, appreciating your home is just as necessary as leaving it. These two actions are intrinsically connected; they feed off of each other. Thinking back to my experience leaving California’s Central Valley, I remember feeling conflicted about my departure. My home has nurtured me for the past 17 years, but it had sheltered me from the outside world. Its mountain ranges entrapped me physically and mentally.

A prime example of this entrapment in California was my nit-picky diet. My rotation of meals peaked at a grand total of 5 different foods, usually different variations of bread and cheese. This “5-year-old’s diet” wasn’t based on dietary or allergic restrictions, but rather a psychological barrier that hampered any desire to try new things. Offers of basic foods like chocolate, chicken tenders, or scrambled eggs were immediately declined, leaving no room for consideration or entertainment. I had never deliberately tried those foods before, therefore I didn’t like them: nothing more. Without knowing it, I had developed this instinctive and irrational rejection of trying new things. 

New foods were an obvious example of my mindless rejections in the Central Valley, but in retrospect I notice other instances where I deliberately denied myself growth. Whether it be tasting falafel for the first time, trying on a pair of sneakers “outside my aesthetic”, or even talking to classmates I had never spoken a word to, my mental block prevailed in hindering new experiences. I had cultivated a way of living at home that was satisfactory, but not stimulating. 

For a long time, this life at home was enough for me. To a certain extent, consistency and familiarity is necessary when it comes to growing up. Still, there comes a time where you begin to prod at the edges of your confinement. It might be enough, but you need a “more”. When, how, or why this urge for change happens varies from person to person, for someone else, it might be a conversation that exposes them to their dream job. For me, a college visit to the Ivies instigated my yearning to grow during my sophomore year of high school. Whatever the case may be, it’s important that you react to whatever force is calling to you. Once you understand what you’re drawn to, I urge you to make it a reality.

In the heat of the moment, it can be so hard to stay true to yourself and trust your gut. As I write these words a year after I decided to attend Columbia, I can say with 100% certainty that leaving home was worth it. College offers a universe of new sights, cultures, flavors, emotions, and friends. It offers the “more” that everyone needs. The only catch: you have to take that initial leap of faith to embrace it all. Regardless of whether you have supporters or adversaries, it’s up to you alone to make your dreams a reality.

The final float of the 2023 Macys Thanksgiving Parade.
Taken on 35mm film.

By Thomas Stewart

Thomas currently attends Columbia University and plans to double major in creative writing and human rights. At Columbia Thomas is a staff writer for the City News section of the Columbia Daily Spectator, where he publishes articles that concern the West Harlem community. In his free time, you can find him practicing music or trying new vegetarian recipes.


Need to connect with friends and family after a big move? Faculty can get 25% off of AT&T’s unlimited everything plan with Faculty ID.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

Creating the Best Version of Yourself

Friday, April 5th, 2024
Sunset car drives with friends

Every morning at 5:05 am, I stare at my reflection in the mirror when I wake up. It is sometimes a glance, but there is so much I see. Some days, I see someone ready to face whatever the day brings, excited to practice to push myself or learn a unique topic in class. On other days, I see someone who is sleep-deprived and stressed, too caught up on daunting tasks or future plans. These phases are ones that many face throughout their college years and beyond—the feelings of passion, drive, and eagerness, but also self-doubt, resentment, and fear. I, too, have recently felt many different emotions nearing the final stretch of my second semester as a sophomore, edging closer to being halfway through college and closer to the real world. 

I recently had a conversation with a friend of mine who is nearing the last semester in college as a senior. She’s soon facing graduation and the start of her job working with a startup in a new city halfway across the country. Talking to her made me realize it is a frightening future to face the unknown, leaving behind what is known as a student to face all the world has to bring as a twenty-something adult, but also full of possibilities and excitement. She says it is a new path she’s ready and eager to begin. It is the mindset I admire and always strive to attain—the ability to seize the moment in a way that is most beneficial to my growth in all aspects of life. 

Creating the best version of yourself comes with various methods and philosophies, each valid and helpful in its own way. Doing a quick search online would come up with an overwhelming amount of information, such as “read more,” “be more physically active,” or “practice kindness.” As someone who uses all of these techniques and sometimes fails, I know  there is something crucial about setting your intentions and mindset, focusing on yourself, and your “why.” There will be voices providing information on the best way to attain your goals or aspirations, but the most important voice to listen to is yours. 

I have slowly learned the necessity of being in tune with your body and emotions. There are long days where practice would be particularly strenuous on both my mind and body, and I would have a full day of three to four classes in a row. On these days, though it sometimes feels unproductive to take time for myself to decompress instead of checking tasks off my list, it would benefit me in the long run. The next day, I almost always feel more energized and eager to attack the day. Listening to my body’s needs has made me better at reevaluating and reflecting on my day and my emotions at the end of the day. If I’m feeling drained and irritated, I can acknowledge possible stressors and take small steps, such as a mindset shift, in tackling these obstacles. 

Throughout it all, always remember to look at the bigger picture. Next time you are outside walking to class or around your peers in class, take a second to recognize how much gratitude and passion there is in all that you do. Knowing this will launch you into whatever life has in store for you next, ready to face setbacks and successes with the best version of yourself you have in the moment.


Treat yourself to a relaxing spa day with this coupon!

By Lecia Sun

Lecia is a student at Tufts University studying Classics and World Literature. When she is not reading, she can be found attempting the New York Times Games, trying out a new creative hobby, and dreaming about her next great bake. 


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.


Share

Nothing is Certain Except for Taxes and Rude Professors: How to Survive Power-Hungry Teachers

Friday, April 5th, 2024

Most people come to college looking to diversify their skill set and dive head-first into their chosen fields. But unfortunately, not every professor has the same intentions when teaching their students. Some of them genuinely care about nurturing young minds to be the next generation of talent in their fields. Some of them are mostly there to further their careers but still try to put as much care as they can into the work they do. But unfortunately, many of them are there to fill whatever powerless void is troubling them in their personal lives and forget the fact that a student-professor relationship goes both ways. This results in teachers taking out unnecessary anger on students, and searching for whatever time and place they can exert their power over their students. 

My freshman year I had a professor who saw potential in my writing talent, but his recognition of my talent made him feel like he had the right to correct my wrongs in whichever way he saw fit. He never missed an opportunity to harshly critique my work in front of the class, suggest changes that completely misinterpreted my vision, and argue back and forth with me during class discussions. This constant ridicule made me feel anxious to go to class, as I was afraid of having my feelings hurt by this professor. The anxiety seeped into my self-confidence, and I started to blame myself for feeling this way. I began to feel that I wasn’t tough enough and that it was my fault for taking things too personally. 

This anxiety and lack of self-confidence began to affect my personal life. My friends started to notice as I became quieter and more nervous in my day-to-day interactions. One day, a friend of mine brought up my change in attitude, and I opened up to them about how I’d been feeling nervous in this class, and how it was making me second-guess myself and the work I produced. 

As I talked it out with them, I realized that it wasn’t me who was the problem; it was him. My friend pointed out that this professor saw both my talent and vulnerability, and used this sweet spot to exert power over me under the guise of helping me. Coming to this conclusion was so important, it helped me contextualize his actions and reframe the situation for myself. I wasn’t the weak and unconfident one, he was. There was nothing I could ever do that would please him, and ease my anxiety. His recognition of my talent to a lot of valuable feedback and advice on my work, but it also led to a lot of emotional turmoil and stress.

Through dealing with this experience, I learned a few tips about how to deal with professors who might not always have the best intentions. The first is to remember your worth. Chances are you’re gonna get critiques on your work, and sometimes they’ll be harsh. Either way, the work you do is still valuable and special. Don’t let anyone take that away from you. Constantly reminding yourself of your worth ensures that you can’t let anyone take it away from you. 

My second tip is to use your voice. I know it’s scary standing up to authority figures, but don’t let yourself be silenced in fear. It’s worth it to set up a one-on-one meeting with your professor to voice your concerns, as maybe they’re unaware of their behavior and you could help them change your mind. My anxiety steered me away from talking to my professor in person, so at the end of my semester during course evaluations, I wrote a letter detailing my feelings toward this professor’s behavior. I knew the evaluations would be read by both the professor and the administrator above him, and that my words would actually be heard and considered this way. If you’re worried about talking to them directly like I was, try sending an email, or setting up a meeting with an office on campus that can help facilitate a productive conversation and safe conversation. On my campus, the Office of Student Success offers services like this, research to see if your school has something similar that could help you. Whatever it is you have to do, if you think you’d feel better by speaking up about it you should do everything in your power to do so. 

My third and last tip is–of course– to take care of yourself. Take a walk after class to clear your mind if you’re upset or anxious. Make it a habit to treat yourself with your favorite snack or candy after each class so you have something to look forward to at the end. If you can, take a mental health day from the class and do something to relieve your stress. At the end of the day what’s important is your mental and physical well-being. As a busy college student, you have to do everything in your power to make sure you’re feeling your best. At the end of the day, this experience taught me to never forget my worth and to not let any way affect my confidence. 

Get yourself a sweet treat at Caffe Bene with this coupon!

By Sidnie Paisley Thomas

Sidnie is a Sophomore at Emerson College in Boston studying creative writing and post-colonial literature. In her free time, you can find her hitting up her local thrift store, playing her favorite records, or reading a new book.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015


Share

On Finding Balance

Thursday, March 21st, 2024
Sitting outside after class in the spring

Experiencing college life forces students to reassess their priorities and what they choose to spend their energy on. There is a newfound independence to this lifestyle, with hopes of meeting academic and personal goals, but there is also a large amount of uncertainty that comes with change. In this new stage in life, finding balance is the key to reaching your milestones. By doing so, it will be easier to focus on what we need to do or want to do in the moment, staying present without worries about the future or past.

The definition of what a balanced lifestyle means varies from individual. It comes with an understanding of one’s priorities and values and what truly makes them happy. It may take the form of limiting iPhone screen time to 1-2 hours a day, reading for 15 minutes before bed, or grabbing lunch with your friends at an off-campus restaurant. Whatever the form may take, there are always trade-offs with tasks that may seem burdensome or necessary to complete, such as that one problem set you’ve been pushing off that’s due at the end of the week or last week’s laundry and cleaning. Counteracting the feelings of stress and anxiety with activities that make you calm, joyous, and energized is the end result of a balanced lifestyle.

Going out to lunch with friends at a restaurant near campus

A balanced lifestyle for me means giving myself moments of calm and happiness when life becomes overwhelming. It appears when I’m winding down after a stressful day, chatting with my roommate about what we accomplished during the day, when I have time to work on my passion projects, or when I’m eating dinner with my friends and catching up on our days. When I’m experiencing these moments of being present, I know there will always be some task I need to do, but it is not as pressing as the present. Experiencing these moments will come naturally with time as you let yourself leave behind any stress in the past and focus on your moment. It helps to give yourself kind reminders, understanding where you are now and giving yourself the opportunity to breathe and focus on yourself. 

Knowing when to say no to favors, change in plans, or any other external factors is sometimes difficult. Putting up these boundaries is necessary for shaping your needs and what you need to actively succeed and pursue your goals. Finding balance connects with creating schedules, prioritizing, and learning what suits your individual needs. Sometimes, life happens and you may spend too much time studying for an exam, taking a nap, or working out. Unexpected changes in your schedule may arise, and you cannot fight them. Despite these challenges, remaining flexible and focused on what matters to you will find a way to be successful and balanced for you. 


Relax and treat yourself with this coupon!

By Lecia Sun

Lecia is a student at Tufts University studying Classics and World Literature. When she is not reading, she can be found attempting the New York Times Games, trying out a new creative hobby, and dreaming about her next great bake. 


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

Not All Who Wander Are Lost: The Importance of Prioritizing Walking in Self-Care

Wednesday, March 20th, 2024

All of my blog posts so far revolve around how to insert healthy self-care habits into your already existing routine, but it’s also important to allocate time in your day for self-care. As a college student, you’re constantly being pulled in many different directions, and while everything you dedicate yourself to in your busy schedule is important, taking care of yourself is even more so. As I’ve said before, you can’t devote yourself to anything if your body and mind aren’t properly taken care of. Ensuring a productive and well-rounded semester always starts with self-care. 

A picture I took on a walk a few weeks ago

One of my favorite ways to prioritize both my mental and physical health is taking walks. Walking has been proven to be an easy way to get exercise, increase your heart rate, and improve physical fitness, without extra stress on the body. But physical benefits aside, I feel the most beneficial part of walking is on my mental health. Balancing a busy face paced schedule is bound to cause stress and sometimes even anxiety. Sometimes, when I have a lot on my plate, I’ll get caught up in my head trying to think about all of it all at once. Juggling school, work, and extra-curriculars all at the same time can easily become overwhelming. In trying to organize my time to create the most productive schedule for the week, I end up feeling anxious and stuck, unable to do anything. The best solution to this for me is going on a walk, I’m able to clear my head and think about things in a more calm and organized manner. 

Making time for frequent walks can also help manage your baseline stress levels. Once or twice a week, I try to go on a walk by myself, it helps me feel more grounded and improves my general mood. I try not to set limits on how long or where I walk, so I can do whatever my mind needs in that moment. Sometimes I wear my headphones and listen to my favorite music, which helps when I’m feeling down or sad. Other times I decide to leave my headphones at home and listen to the sounds of the city around me. This helps when I’m feeling anxious and want to be more in touch with myself. Depending on the mood I’m in I go to the park, or I’ll stay on a busier street, whatever I feel will help my mood. Either way, by the end of the walk I usually feel happier and ready to take on whatever challenges I’m facing. 

Walking is also a great way to connect with friends and family during a busy schedule. If you and your friends only have a limited amount of time to see each other, going on a short walk and exploring the area is a fun way to make the most of your time. Also on walks, you can stay in touch with family who are far away by giving them a call as you’re on your stroll. However or wherever you decide to walk, it is worth taking the time out of your day to do it. It’s a fun and easy way to take care of yourself that pays off in the long run.

Enjoy 20% off at The Maharaja with this coupon!

By Sidnie Paisley Thomas

Sidnie is a Sophomore at Emerson College in Boston studying creative writing and post-colonial literature. In her free time, you can find her hitting up her local thrift store, playing her favorite records, or reading a new book.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.


Share

Early Bird Gets The Worm: How to Utilize Your Mornings For A Brighter Day

Wednesday, March 13th, 2024

To most college students, waking up early seems like a catastrophe. I’ve had my fair share of doing everything in my power to dodge 8 am classes during registration and being late to early morning shifts because I slept in. But if you’re having trouble managing your time during the day, taking advantage of the time before your day starts may be beneficial to you. 

A beautiful Boston sunrise.

During my freshman year, I had trouble finding time in the day to do everything I needed to. Balancing school, work, and dance, I only had so many free hours in the day to get my work done. At the time my classes started around 11 or 12, and afterward, I always had work or dance practice. By the end of the day, I was exhausted, but still had loads of schoolwork to do before I could go to bed. This cycle quickly wore me out, and soon I had to start thinking of other ways to make my days productive. At first, I tried staying up late at night and sleeping later in the day. I found this only made me less productive since forcing myself to stay up late usually resulted in me falling asleep at my desk. I tried to find time in the middle of the day between classes and shifts, but it was never enough. I’d always have enough time to start assignments but never finish them. The only time left was the morning, and since my classes started around noon, in theory, I could wake up an hour or two earlier. The last thing I wanted to do was to force myself up to work, but I thought I would at least give it a try and see if I could fit in some work before my busy days even started. 

At first, it was difficult. Some days I would shut the early alarms off and roll over for more sleep, others I would drag myself out of bed as much as I could, but give up once I made it to my desk. Through a combination of setting 2 to 3 alarms each day and getting to bed earlier at night, I was slowly able to start waking up on time. After getting over the initial hump of waking up early, I started getting into the groove of working in the morning. I found that I was more productive at the start of the day, and had an easier time staying focused on the task at hand. It also made me feel more accomplished when I woke up and worked in the morning. Before noon, I had already checked a few things off my to-do list which gave me confidence. Another perk of getting an early start is that I’d come home with little or no work to do in the evening, and I’d be able to relax and go to sleep instead of pushing myself to keep working in exhaustion. 

When you’re struggling with productivity, the most important thing to do is to put yourself first. Think about the times of day when you feel most energized and productive, but also think about times you had never considered before. Getting up early seemed impossible to me at first, but once I started doing it it completely changed how I structured my day and got my work done. Think about times of the day you’ve ignored in the past and ask yourself how you can utilize them for a brighter day!

Stay relaxed and productive with this coupon for Best MG Spa!

By Sidnie Paisley Thomas

Sidnie is a Sophomore at Emerson College in Boston studying creative writing and post-colonial literature. In her free time, you can find her hitting up her local thrift store, playing her favorite records, or reading a new book.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

All That Glitters is Not Gold: How to Surround Yourself With The Right People

Wednesday, March 6th, 2024
A picture I took at the Isabella Stuart Gardener Museum, a fun place for a friend date.

In college, it’s important to have friends who support you through the good times and the bad. When things get rough, having people to reach out to for help and support can make a world of difference. During some of my roughest times, I was lucky enough to have friends who did everything they could to make me feel better. But finding an amazing friend group was no easy feat.  

At the beginning of freshman year, I was determined to make as many friends as possible. In high school, I was extremely shy and stuck to a small group of friends, never branching out. While I was happy living this way, I knew that I limited myself to the same people because I was afraid of being judged for putting myself out there. In this new chapter of my life, I was determined to try something new. I didn’t want to let my anxiety stop me from meeting amazing people. So during orientation, I pushed myself to my social limit and spoke to every person who’d listen. It was difficult since I wasn’t used to being so social, but not impossible since orientation was a time for everyone to put themselves out there. I met a lot of different kinds of people from different backgrounds and places I had never spoken to before. It was exciting to immerse myself in an environment full of people from all around the world. But at the same time, it was exhausting, and my social energy slowly drained throughout the week. By the time classes started, I was back in my introverted shell, dreading all of the icebreaker activities during syllabus week. 

In my efforts to expand my friend horizons, I met many great people but also some not-so-great ones. I’ll never regret putting myself out there, but I do regret my decision to ignore my gut feelings about people under the guise of being open and welcoming to new people. I had a friend first-semester freshman year and the first time we met I remember feeling like he was nice–but there was something off about him. In my efforts to form close friendships with as many people as possible, I ignored it in favor of getting to know him better. At first, our friendship was normal, we talked a lot about music and books since we were both music lovers and writing majors. As the semester went on we started closer than I ever expected we would be. That strange feeling from when we first met remained, but since I exhausted myself from pretending to be a social butterfly, I didn’t have the confidence to tell him how I felt. Slowly, as I started forming closer relationships with other friends, he started to get upset and felt like I owed him my time and friendship. By the end of the semester, I had to end our relationship after he became hostile towards my other friends. As it was all unfolding, I felt guilty that I let this person hurt my friends because I didn’t trust myself in the beginning. While it’s important to put yourself out there, your comfort and safety always have to come first. If I never pushed myself beyond my social limit and trusted my gut feeling about that friend, I would’ve been in a better place to create more meaningful relationships. In the end, it all worked out because in future relationships I trusted my gut and ran for the hills when I felt uncomfortable or strange. Now I have the best group of funny supportive friends, who are always there for me when I need them.

If you’re looking for a great meal with friends, use this coupon for 15% percent off at Smashburger.

By Sidnie Paisley Thomas

Sidnie is a Sophomore at Emerson College in Boston studying creative writing and post-colonial literature. In her free time, you can find her hitting up her local thrift store, playing her favorite records, or reading a new book.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

In Sickness and In Health: Balancing Work and School Under The Weather

Thursday, February 29th, 2024
A picture of during freshman orientation frolicking the city at night for the first time.

It seems that no matter how hard you try, sickness always creeps up on you in the worst moments. My first semester of freshman year was one of the busiest times of my life and I was terrified of getting sick. I was juggling a heavy course load, a staff writing job, and dance team rehearsals. Because of all this, being sick and out of commission for days didn’t feel like an option for me. All around me friends and classmates were falling victim to the “freshman flu,” a sickness with no cure, no timeline, and no perceived end that always made its way around freshman dorms during the fall semester. I heard stories from classmates in years above me of catching it during orientation week and fighting it off until Thanksgiving break which only worsened my health anxiety. 

I did everything I could to avoid it. For weeks I wore a mask everywhere, washed my hands constantly, and took loads of immunity vitamins. Then one morning I woke up with a tickle in my throat and an ache in my head. By that afternoon I was bedridden with a fever, so I dragged myself to the health center the next day for tests. Flu, COVID, and strep all came back negative and I felt relief wash over me. But in the glimmer of hope that came with negative results, I saw the truth; I had the freshman flu. 

My CVS haul post freshman flu diagnosis.

I fell ill on a Friday and had a mandatory dance rehearsal on Sunday and a paper due on Monday. I was already stressed to tackle this workload as it was, so my sickness only caused more anxiety for me to manage. I decided to take all day Saturday to rest, drink plenty of fluids, and take some medication. Then, by Sunday I’d be able to go to my rehearsal and write my paper for Monday. I spent my Saturday in bed trying my hardest to rest, but my mind couldn’t stop racing about all of the things I’d have to tackle on Sunday. I tried to ignore it by reading or watching movies, but as the day went on my stress built and built. After my attempt at a day of rest, I woke up on Sunday better, but nowhere near perfect. I got up early to write my paper before rehearsal to ease my anxious mind. I worked so hard I forgot to eat breakfast and by the time it was lunch time I had to run off to dance. I danced for three hours, then had a quick dinner before I went home and revised my paper all night. 

My eyes barely cracked open Monday morning. I rolled over and groaned as my alarm went off. My roommate saw my rough condition and asked if I was ok. When I went to respond my throat burned with pain. I could barely croak out the word “No.”

Sickness, whether it be the freshman flu or strep throat, is unforgiving. It doesn’t reason, or accommodate, it demands your time and attention. Prioritizing work and school is important, but if you’re too sick to think straight you can’t prioritize anything. I learned the hard way that when rundown with sickness, the most important thing to do is take time for yourself. I spent that next week feeling a little bit better, then pushing myself to get up and work until I couldn’t anymore. Each time I’d force myself to get up and work, my anxiety about falling behind was soothed, but my health would get worse. What you have to understand is that resting and taking care of yourself is not a waste of time. If you don’t take the time to eat right, get proper rest, and prioritize your health, you won’t be able to do any of the things that are important to you. Your health always has to come first, when you’re rested and healthy you’ll be ready to deal with all of the challenges and obstacles college throws your way. 

By Sidnie Paisley Thomas

Sidnie is a Sophomore at Emerson College in Boston studying creative writing and post-colonial literature. In her free time, you can find her hitting up her local thrift store, playing her favorite records, or reading a new book.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

One of my favorite sick day treats is Le Macaron, use this coupon for 15% off your next purchase!

Share