Posts Tagged ‘college life’

Chapter 4- Applying to Study Abroad and the Nerves that Came With It

Wednesday, August 18th, 2021

I’ve previously mentioned that studying abroad was something that interested me when I initially applied to Boston University, particularly the opportunity to do so in London. Fortunately for me, BU actually had programs in London specifically for students studying English. For some reason, even before I started my freshman year at college, I had this whole plan laid out: I would get to know Boston during my first year, then I would study abroad the following year, and afterwards, I would dedicate myself to finding internships and figuring out what I really wanted to do after I graduated. 

However, I also experienced a lot of homesickness when I moved to Boston, as I discussed in previous chapters. It took me a while to adjust and I felt like I finally started to find my footing during the spring semester of my freshman year. Therefore, when the application deadline to study abroad in the fall of my sophomore year began to creep upon me, I knew that I should postpone my plans to study abroad.

I am not one to typically deviate from plans I have set in my mind, but I was confident in my decision not to study abroad my sophomore year. I felt like I was truly getting to know Boston that spring and I didn’t want to suddenly leave in order to study abroad. Also, I wanted to have more experience being independent and self-sufficient before going to a different country. I ended up spending my sophomore year getting more acclimated to BU and Boston, and I consequently also got to know the joy of trudging through thigh-high mountains of snow in order to get to my 9:30 a.m. class.

Photo taken during a Nor'Easter in 2018; the sidewalk is covered with snow as figure in jacket walks down. Snow falling blurs the image.
Image credit: https://www.bu.edu/articles/2021/anticipating-major-snowfall-charles-river-campus-to-close-monday-remote-classes/ 

When spring of 2019 rolled around, I started working on my London application: I contacted BU’s study abroad office to ask questions, got my advisor to fill out a form, reached out to a former professor for a letter of recommendation, answered the application’s questionnaire, etc. I, at long last, submitted my application in March, and was then left to wait.

I clearly remember the day I was accepted into the London program. It was a Friday and I had returned to my dorm, ready to collapse and take a nap after a long week of classes. Just before doing so, I checked my email and saw the email congratulating me on my acceptance into the program. Then, I immediately called my mom. When she answered, I blurted out the news and started crying, partially because I was sleep deprived, but mostly because I was so happy. 

Even as the novelty of my imminent travels wore off a bit, I was mostly ecstatic. I had some nerves about studying abroad, though they weren’t as prominent as the nerves I had towards initially moving to Boston. There were three things I was most anxious about regarding going to London:

  1. I had never gone somewhere foreign to me on my own. In the past, I had voyaged outside the United States, but only to Guatemala and always with a family member to see other relatives.
  2. I wasn’t completely sure if I would like London, despite always having wanted to go there. When it came to Boston, I at least had the luxury of visiting the city both before and after being accepted into BU, meaning I had seen the area prior to deciding to undertake my undergraduate studies there. Conversely, with London, I would be seeing the city for the first time when I arrived in September to start my classes. Essentially, I had no way of knowing whether I would like London until I was actually there.
  3. I would be very far away from my family. I’ve stated before that I am close with my family and they are an important support system for me. Even though Boston is certainly a distance from my hometown, I was able to return home for holidays and long weekends throughout the semester. I did have some relatives who said they wanted to visit me when I was in London, but I still had to reckon with the thought of not seeing my mom or other close family members for an entire semester. 

When I started overthinking and overanalyzing these small details, I reflected back on my time at BU up to that point. All those worries I initially had about BU had slowly evaporated and I couldn’t picture myself anywhere else. I understood that I had to go into traveling with a positive mindset. Besides, visiting London had been a dream of mine and three months wouldn’t be too long. If I kept worrying about everything, I wouldn’t enjoy my study abroad experience.

Still, on August 31st, 2019, thousands of questions about the future rushed through my mind as I arrived at JFK and boarded my flight to Heathrow. I couldn’t even sleep as the plane cut across the night sky and flew over the Atlantic Ocean. As I watched episodes of Friends and Parks and Recreation in hopes of dozing off, I wondered what the next few months would look like.

Hours later, the plane landed on the surprisingly sunny morning of September 1st.

My London adventure had commenced! 

Picture of the London Eye and River Thames from my first full day in London.

Ultimately, if you are interested in studying abroad, do so when you feel ready (going to a new country for the first time and living there for several months is certainly a change!) and make sure to research various different programs. Contact your school’s study abroad office to ask any questions you may have, ranging from classes to living arrangements and try to learn more about the country you might potentially be studying abroad in. 

By: Monica Manzo

Monica Manzo recently completed her undergraduate studies at Boston University where she majored in English and minored in History. Currently, she is planning on applying for some masters programs in publishing. In her free time, she can be found either reading or adding to her pile of unread books.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Chapter One: Welcome Week

Friday, August 13th, 2021

I love flying into New York City at night. I always choose the aisle seat on airplanes because of my motion sickness, but I can never resist peeking through the plane’s windows in my periphery; one of my favorite views is that of the glittering lights beneath New York City’s night sky.


Bird's eye view of NYC at night
Bird’s eye view of NYC at night

In August of 2016, I flew from Colorado to New York in order to get settled in prior to beginning my college career. Once the plane landed, my stomach flipped over in excitement. My mom had come with me to help me move and I couldn’t believe that my dream of attending NYU had become a reality. 

Of course, I was also terrified. I knew that no one else from my high school class would be coming to NYU, and after my mom left I had no choice but to confront my newfound alone-ness. I sardonically thought to myself, “Well, welcome to Welcome Week.” 

I felt like a failure and my first semester had not even begun. One of my assigned roommates, whose name was also Anna, was a drama student in the Tisch School of the Arts. Off the bat, Tisch’s performing arts medium provides a tight-knit cohort community you’ll know for years, and I did not have that luxury as a Media, Culture, and Communication student since we were not placed into cohorts. I really liked the other Anna, and we made plans to hang out at one of NYU’s Welcome Week events: Drag Bingo, which featured contestants from RuPaul’s Drag Race. It seemed cool, and I nostalgically wished that one of my closest high-school friends was there because he would’ve loved it. He even made up his own drag name in honor of the show: “Shaneeda Bronze” (as in, “She needs a bronze.”). 

While I wallowed in nostalgia and loneliness on the second night of Welcome Week, I knew I needed to play a more active role in my own life. Unfortunately, I arrived at Drag Bingo well after the other Anna, and there were no more seats available near her (and no one was allowed to save seats). At that point, I was still standing in a stairwell in a line (or on a line for all the “real” New Yorkers) spanning across multiple floors. When I reached one of the landings, I noticed a pair of tan double doors to my right as someone threw them open to go through. I wondered aloud to the two girls standing in front of me, “Do you think we could go up that way?” They both shrugged and we continued standing in line. I stood with the girls at the back of the room during the event, and afterward they invited me over to their shared dorm. And that is how I met my best friends.

It was serendipitous as much as it was the effort we put in to socialize with other students and get to know our college community at various events. Certainly don’t hesitate asking your roommate(s) to hang out, and seeing if you can be friends! 


Playbill at Sunday in the Park with George. (Before we knew Jake Gyllenhaal “doesn’t shower often.”)

Since we are required to live in dorms for our first year, I wanted to make the most of my dorming experience as well. NYU offers “Themed Engagement Communities,” wherein specific floors in respective dormitory buildings will schedule activities pertaining to that theme. When I applied for housing I threw my hat in the ring for the “Laughing Matters” comedy-themed fourth floor of the Weinstein building. I have loved comedy since I was in elementary school, and decided to study Media because of my reverence for political satire. Applying to the special interest floor gave me wonderful (cost-saving) opportunities to view an array of Broadway performances for $10 each. We went to see plays including Avenue Q, Sunday in the Park with George, and Dear Evan Hansen, as well as professional improvisation shows. 

Regrettably, I only joined a club, College Democrats, in senior year. I regret having waited that long to be more involved in the clubs on campus, especially because my senior year ended up being truncated due to COVID-19. NYU, like many colleges, hosts a Club Fest in both the fall and the spring, and trust me, there is no shortage of clubs to choose from, whether it’s political, athletic, improv, or food-related, etc. 

Of course, the college experience and New York City are two of the most overly-romanticized notions you may hear about. I still cried myself to sleep during those first few nights as I second-guessed my abilities to make friends. Yet, you are drawn to whatever city you end up in for a reason. You don’t have to figure it out right away. Find solace in your comfort mechanisms, like comedy is for me, and in the meantime, don’t be a passenger in your own life.


We encountered this sign outside of a restaurant (Gran Electrica) in Dumbo

Beginning your freshman year, I recommend you:

  • Do research about special dorming opportunities while selecting a dorm. Mine was the cheapest and we got to go see Br’dway shows for $10! (kudos if you get that reference)
  • Look for activities to do that are hosted by your school (after you cry a little bit because you’re overwhelmed and alone)
  • Get to know your roommates!
  • Have some adventures with said roommates. Even if it means accidentally ending up in Far Rockaway because you missed your subway stop. (I get lost nearly every day of my life; I call it sightseeing.)


By: Anna Matefy

Anna Matefy recently graduated from NYU with a Bachelor’s in Media, Culture, and Communication. She has been working in politics for the past few years, and wants to transition into a career in media entertainment/comedy. She will be attending NYU as a graduate student in Media beginning in 2021.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Chapter 3- Getting to Know Boston

Thursday, August 12th, 2021

As I began to overcome my homesickness, I started stepping out of my comfort zone, which was also a challenge for me. One of the first things I did in order to accomplish this goal was look at clubs and organizations that Boston University offered. BU has something at the beginning of each semester called Splash, which is a student group recruitment fair. It was here where I wandered around aimlessly for a while at the start of my freshman year and signed up for any club that looked remotely interesting. 

You never know what may happen when you join a club, even for something you have no experience in. For example, in the spring semester of my freshman year, I decided to check out BU’s knitting club, even though I had never knitted in my life. I signed up for the club’s email list at Splash in the fall, but never got around to checking it out. However, as my first spring semester at BU commenced, I decided to do so. The first meeting in the student union lounge  was pretty crowded, but the club provided me with some supplies and I was taught the basics. Unfortunately, the first few rows of my knitted square looked like a mess. Still, the desire for improvement motivated me to show up the following week. After that, attending knitting club meetings became a fairly regular routine for me. I would get a beverage from Starbucks, go to the lounge, pick up my square from the bin of yarn of supplies and knit a few rows.

What I enjoyed most about the knitting club was that not only did I have the satisfaction of learning a new skill, but it was such a calming distraction after a day of classes. I could relax, knit, and talk to the other club members. For two hours we would talk about how our week’s were going, share stories from high school, and discuss classes, TV shows, anime, restaurants, books, etc. I was able to get new recommendations and suggestions, like that I should check out John Mulaney’s comedy specials on Netflix. The knitting club was enjoyable and, by May, my messy square transformed into a decent looking rectangle.

The end of my first semester with the knitting club also brought a surprise: the e-board asked me if I could be vice president for the following year, since the existing members would be graduating. I never thought I would be suited for a leadership position, but it was one of those moments where I thought “why not?” So, I agreed to take on the role during my sophomore year and I, once again, had a fun experience with the club. I taught new attendees the basics (since I was by no means an expert) and conversed with both them and existing members alike. This was an outcome I would have never anticipated, yet it certainly assisted in pushing me out of my shell. 

Outside the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Aside from clubs, I emerged from my comfort zone by doing activities off-campus. I had classes that required me to go to the Museum of Fine Arts and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (to which BU students had free admission). Art was never a strong passion of mine, but I always decided to make days of these trips. I would spend a few hours walking around and checking out the countless works of art while imagining a different time period.

Inside the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

Another way I got to know Boston during my first two years was by making plans with friends that I met at BU. These plans ranged from simple, spur of the moment stuff like going to see a movie or eating out somewhere, to more organized outings such as going to Anime Boston, trying out an escape room, seeing a ballet, and attending a hockey game. Even though I would classify myself as an introvert, planning activities with friends gave me something to look forward to throughout the semesters. This was especially important during the periods when I needed a break, signified by the multiple essays I would simultaneously write and the mountains of reading I was drowning under. 

BU’s Agganis Arena.

When my family drove to Boston to visit me, that meant we could use the car to easily drive to areas outside of the city and explore other parts of Massachusetts. For instance, in the spring of my sophomore year, my relatives from Guatemala flew to see my family in New Jersey. During their visit, we took the opportunity to visit Salem for the first time, which turned out to be a really fun outing where we walked around the historic city.

Essentially, the three things I recommend in order to get to know your city/campus more are:

  • Joining a club/organization because you can meet people, try something new and pick up a hobby.
  • Taking advantage of free/reduced admissions that you are offered as a student.
  • Accepting/making plans with friends and family.

By: Monica Manzo

Monica Manzo recently completed her undergraduate studies at Boston University where she majored in English and minored in History. Currently, she is planning on applying for some masters programs in publishing. In her free time, she can be found either reading or adding to her pile of unread books.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Acceptance: Becoming a College Student

Friday, July 30th, 2021

Autumn of 2017 was one of the most stressful times of my life. A few months shy of 18, I spent the Saturday after Halloween submerged in the couch, eyes fixed to my computer screen while episodes of Spongebob played muted on the TV. That night, the Early Action college application would close promptly at midnight. 

The day prior, a friend explained to me there was a higher chance of getting accepted into the colleges I wanted if I applied for Early Action because of the smaller number of applicants. I rushed home as soon as school was over, planted myself on the couch and started to type out supplemental essays for the eight schools I wished to attend. 

During my senior year I was still pretty unsure with what I wanted to do with my life. I knew I enjoyed reading and writing but I didn’t have a passion like many others in my grade. Because of this, I applied to schools all across the country without getting my hopes too high. I didn’t have a specific dream that involved a particular school, but I planned on attending the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, a campus about 15 minutes from my house and a safety school for most locals. 

Photo Credit: www.instagram.com/umntwincities

A few anxious months later, the results started trickling in. I found out I was accepted to the University of Wisconsin, Madison while in line for popcorn at the movie theater. My acceptance to the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities arrived by email at dinner time, while my parents watched the local news and ate dinner on the couch. My acceptance into Boston University’s College of Communication came on a lazy afternoon watching cartoons in my basement. 

Getting accepted to BU came as a major surprise. To be honest, I had completely forgotten I even applied and only did so because of my dad’s encouragement. One drizzly and cold spring break trip to Boston a year prior to visit BU’s campus left me with a bad impression of the college and the town. The campus was a group of blocky, concrete buildings plopped down in the middle of a busy city. The outdated library and brutalist dorms were depressing. Nickerson Field in West Campus was the only part of the school that felt remotely similar to the colleges I grew up near, but the campus lacked community and school spirit. 

Because of that trip I almost turned my back completely on BU. I spent many long nights mulling over my choice between the University of Minnesota and the University of Wisconsin. My acceptance to BU was a great honor and opportunity, but it was completely forgotten under my preconceived notions and first impressions of the school. 

I almost let judgement get in the way of my decision. Watching the kids in the grades above me go to big schools like the University of Minnesota and the University of Wisconsin compelled me to follow in their footsteps. Attending schools in the Midwest was easy and familiar and most were a short drive away from my childhood home and populated with many other graduates from my high school. 

Luckily, my dad knew that moving out of the Midwest and across the country by myself was the best thing for me. It would teach me confidence and resilience, two qualities I lacked from growing up in such a tight-knit and predictable community. 

Taking risks, especially at a time in life with so much change, can be paralyzingly terrifying. Whether you’re attending a school 15 minutes from your house or 1500 miles away, moving out of your house and gaining independence is a major step in anyone’s life. I was lucky enough to have another influence pushing me to get out and take a risk. I realize a lot of people may not have that luxury, but I hope any other indecisive students realize that every opportunity is important and something to take seriously. 

Me, in the middle, with my two best friends of 10 years walking through our elementary school on graduation day. Photo taken by Sammy Baraga.

Don’t let fear hold you back from taking chances and don’t let fear control your perceptions. I almost passed up one of the greatest opportunities of my life because I was scared and I let fear justify my negative feelings. 

That being said, choosing to attend BU and move over one thousand miles away from my home was one of the hardest decisions and transitions I’ve ever made. At the time, life only seemed to get worse, but writing this now I can look back and appreciate all of the challenges and hard moments for how they’ve shaped me today.

My name is Toni Baraga and I am a senior in COM at Boston University studying journalism with a minor in archaeology. I have a passion for writing and I believe that everyone has a story. I have worked as a reporter for various newspapers, such the Somerville Journal and Boston University’s Daily Free Press. I grew up in St. Paul Minnesota and reside in Boston.

For over 20 years, theCampus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a specialcoupon bookletand theOfficial Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At theCampus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check ourwebsite for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during theWelcome Week of 2015.

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Confessions of a Recent Graduate: What Am I Going to Do with My Life?

Sunday, March 14th, 2021

The college years are supposed to be the time when you figure out who you are and who you want to be—or at least that’s what I thought when I was 18 years old and headed to my first class at NYU in a blouse-pants combo that tried and failed to come off as business casual. I knew I wanted to apply to NYU’s International Relations Honors Program and that I would double major in Spanish. (At the time, to graduate with an International Relations degree at NYU you had to be admitted in the honors program. Current undergraduates can choose to do the major with or without the honors component). I didn’t know exactly what I wanted to do with these degrees. I knew I was interested in expanding my horizons in the literal sense; I wanted to learn about the political and cultural complexities of places I had only read about growing up in a conservative Nebraskan town. I also knew I wanted to help people, which I admit is a vague goal, but I felt an almost tangible empathy for the people I met and the people I read about that I couldn’t ignore.

Graduating in my backyard!

I was sure that answers, or at least some sort of clarity, would come to me. I certainly didn’t expect to feel even more unsure of what I wanted to do with my life when receiving my diploma than when I was walking to my first class. I was about to graduate, yet I was reading articles and taking personality tests trying to figure out what type of career might spark my youthful spirit (or at least not smother that spirit under a pillow) and earn me enough money to live in an apartment that’s up to code. After three years of internships, I was still no closer to deciding my career path than when I fumbled to my first interview in ill-fitting heels.

However, I’ve realized that I don’t need to find or choose a career path. I’m already on a career path; it’s right there on my resume. I have years of workplace stories to share from at least three different industries. My eclectic ventures, swinging from job to job, have shown me sides of the world that I wouldn’t have encountered at a small college where the only available jobs are at the library or student center. 

Through this series of articles, I will attempt to connect the dots between my odd jobs, from New York City to Spain, and from public relations to public defense. At first, I wanted to shape foreign policy at the State Department. Then I wanted to fight for justice and work to end mass incarceration as a top-shot attorney. Through these experiences, however, I often felt a creative urge when I least expected it. There was a love for film and literature that I couldn’t satiate no matter how much I consumed. I still want to advance a global mindset, like a UN Ambassador, and contribute to the fight for justice, like an ACLU attorney, but I want to do it through the art of storytelling. 

I resisted this conclusion for a long time, as I was tempted by the increased stability of a more straightforward career path. Through plenty of practice (and years of mental health care), I have learned to accept and even embrace uncertainty. I am constantly discovering what I am interested in, what I am skilled at, and who I want to be. I believe that going to college in New York City is one of the best ways to open yourself to the array of possibilities that is your career and your life. I will share how I navigated the competitive internship market, the setbacks of rejection, and the brilliance of finding something you love to do. I hope to convey that it is more than acceptable to feel uncertain about your future during college. In fact, that uncertainty might propel you somewhere better than you ever expected.

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By Marisa Bianco

Marisa graduated from NYU in May 2020, summa cum laude, with degrees in International Relations and Spanish. She grew up in Nebraska, but she is currently living in Córdoba, Spain, where she works as an English teacher. You can find her eating tapas in the Spanish sun while likely stressing about finding her life’s purpose.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Dating Etiquette across the Globe

Monday, March 8th, 2021

I’m sure you all know that things operate differently depending on factors such as culture and location. We all walk a different path in life, that’s what makes us distinctive individuals. The meaning of love and the way you express it may be perceived with disapproval or repugnance by others. All of these ideas tie into good manners, which can be applied into more than just love scenarios. You want to be viewed as a good citizen who is well-informed and educated; otherwise, people will think negatively of you and believe that you weren’t properly taught. This topic of dating etiquette is also analogous to love languages, since we exhibit affection and delineate love in different ways. Another important concept that should be enumerated is interracial dating—a controversial one indeed as it is looked down upon by those not condoning of it. When there is a romantic relationship between two people stemming from contrasting cultures, they are essentially embodying each other’s culture, customs, and family history. We’re in the year 2021 and interracial dating is not abnormal. In fact, it’s becoming more generalized especially here in the United States. The Pew Research Center found that the percentage of interracial couples living together increased from 7.4 in 2000 to 10.2 around 2016.

When witnessing how various cultures interpret love, we may initially think to ourselves “oh that’s weird” or “how is this even romantic?” The irony is that people from different backgrounds may find our own love expressions preposterous, or even disgusting. What I’m trying to say is that we all think similarly because we’re just not accustomed to foreign dating customs and our values don’t line up with theirs, and at the end of the day it’s a new experience for everyone. I can even speak from personal experience; my parents met in China and have been married for over two decades. You would believe that their marriage is healthy, right? Truth be told, I don’t see a connection or a romantic interest in either one of them. I also find it funny and peculiar that I’ve never even seen them do anything intimate like giving a quick kiss. I don’t know if people in China are embarrassed about love or they get married just for the sake of it; as a matter of fact, I can’t recall any memories of my family members demonstrating any romantic attraction, and the discussion of sex is considered taboo. Keep in mind that love is subjective and it doesn’t have to meet another person’s standards—just do what’s right for your own relationship. Who cares what the next person thinks, his or her opinion shouldn’t affect you much. Human beings are judgmental, let them make comments. You should be proud of your rendition of love.

https://lovedevani.com/dating-culture-in-brazil

Here is a list of countries and their respective dating protocols that I compiled that may leave you astounded.

Japan:

  • Although sex is not necessarily shown as taboo, public affection is not permitted.
  • First dates typically occur in a group meeting (goukon).
  • If you become the Bachelor or get stuck on a group date then I recommend kicking off the date with sweets! You can use Campus Clipper coupons like the one below for some enjoyable cookies and cupcakes. Click here to view the coupon and make sure to go to the Campus Clipper website for more savings.
  • PDA isn’t taken lightly, negatively viewed – the most you would get after a romantic date is probably a stiff hug.
  • Shy away from direct feelings & expressions, much prefer subtle signs.

France:

  • Like Japan, most first dates take place in a group setting.
  • Going on dates or seeing someone and displaying affection typically indicates that you’re committed to someone.
  • More romance in dating.
  • A good deal of PDA.
  • Serious eye contact.

India:

  • Casual dating isn’t well received.
  • End goal is marriage.
  • There is a notion that women have to always be pursued and pampered.
  • Arranged marriages still exist but take form online through dating apps, rather than the traditional way. There are apps available for Indians parents to match their children to anyone they find compatible with. 

China:

  • Actual dating schools exist for men due to the gender imbalance in China (because of the one child per family policy).
  • It is fine to call and text frequently, even if the relationship just started.
  • The Chinese take marriage quite solemnly, there’s a pressure of getting married; once you reach your 30s and you’re still single then you’re classified as a “leftover.”
  • Strays away from verbal affection due to various reasons like awkwardness and cultural traditions.

By: Alex Huang

Alex is a student at the Fashion Institute of Technology majoring in Advertising & Marketing Communications. He used to major in psychology because he didn’t know what to do with his life and now wants to be in the business world. He gets distracted easily by all of the pretty girls in New York City and hopes to become a PR or Marketing manager someday. One of his favorite things to do is going out for bubble tea.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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COVID & Its Impact on Dating

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2021

Life takes twists and turns, the pandemic reformed the world and we have to acclimate to what is considered the new normal. If many areas like the economy have been altered then the dating scene should also be a bit different, right? Although the dating landscape is now more heavily focused on online dating, the pandemic is making everything more online prior to the start of the epidemic; the only difference is that now people have no other choice but to utilize dating apps such as Tinder and Bumble to find love. With public spaces being closed and restrictions enforced, there’s really no way to meet a potential partner face to face in public let alone go on a traditional date. Not only are singles going through a tough time, those already in a relationship are suffering as well since we can’t see each other as much, especially long distance relationships. Moreover, college students can no longer attend parties or extracurricular activities to meet people. Because of these current stipulations, many of us are on the same boat to doing things virtually which eventually leaves a heavy feeling of loneliness. There was a study conducted in 2019 that illustrated the aftermath of swiping on dating apps, users couldn’t help but feel lonelier than before.

Whether you love it or hate it, the reality is that online dating is here to stay and will continue to proliferate. The presence of COVID-19 prompted people to crave interactions to eliminate the feeling of being lonely regardless if it’s for a friendship or romantic relationship; the most plausible method to go about this is counting on dating apps despite the sheer number of users and competition there. Now I wouldn’t advocate hopping on online dating platforms because they may result in low self-esteem and confidence issues, which tends to apply to more men than women. If you happen to land on a date with someone, communicate with them in order to see what type of date both of you prefer. A large number of people stick to a video call as their first date which is very common nowadays; this is an outstanding strategy to determine if both parties can engage with each other on a deeper level and if there’s compatibility. This also helps take cat-fishing out of the equation, you can see if the person you matched with is who you pictured them to be.

https://abc7news.com/how-to-date-during-a-pandemic-online-dating-tips-for-meeting-the-right-person-advice/6419474/

We have to recognize that anyone can still contract the virus when they socialize or partake in intimate contact. The most realistic options that you have for a safe date are going for walks in the park, grabbing coffee at a cafe, and hosting a picnic just to name a few. I’m aware that these are only viable ideas for either a first or second date, but you’ll have to work with what you have and hope for the best; it’s going to be redundant and mundane, but what can you really do about it given the present circumstances? Taking the date to the next level generally indicates sex; however, it’s going to be perilous and you’re going to look like a fool with a mask on. Furthermore, a doctor by the name of Kimberly Tilley claimed that wearing a mask won’t reduce the chances of disseminating the virus because it’s just not possible to social distance during sex. Meeting up with someone for the first time during the pandemic can also be super awkward, believe it or not. Try to imagine this in your head, pretend that I’m so excited to meet this pretty girl at Central Park and I see her smiling but what do I even do? Should I welcome her by giving her a hug? Giving your date a hug is what most people do, it shows that you’re genuinely delighted to see them; however, what if the girl completely dodges my hug? If my hug gets brushed off then it undoubtedly changes the whole mood and environment of the planned date. I would want to turn around and scurry back home to avoid the humiliation I just went through. It’s going to feel like you just had your heart ripped out literally and I can only imagine how embarrassing it would be if there were people watching. Many would prefer not to be touched with COVID cases spiking, but ask your date if you can hug them or try to read their body language. For the time being, you’ll have to stick to what limited resources that are available or perhaps use this time wisely and work on yourself until normalcy returns. Trust me, I know this isn’t the most ideal time to search for love but hey try to picture it from the bright side; all this spare time will allow you to set goals for yourself and improve yourself then you can come back more than ready to meet people after this fiasco concludes.


By: Alex Huang

Alex is a student at the Fashion Institute of Technology majoring in Advertising & Marketing Communications. He used to major in psychology because he didn’t know what to do with his life and now wants to be in the business world. He gets distracted easily by all of the pretty girls in New York City and hopes to become a PR or Marketing manager someday. One of his favorite things to do is going out for bubble tea.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Find Your Love Language

Wednesday, February 24th, 2021

I know that love is beautiful and romantic, but how exactly do you express it with your significant other? That’s where the concept of love languages comes in; there are a total of five universal love languages as explained by Gary Chapman. In his book, “The Five Love Languages for Singles,” he states that “Love is the fundamental building block of all human relationships. It will greatly impact our values and morals. Love is the important ingredient in one’s search for meaning.” Not every relationship is going to convey love in the same way because we all have our own notions surrounding what love is. Therefore, it’s important to ponder how different people demonstrate affection in various ways and also desire affection in specific ways. A partnership is like a puzzle, you have to figure out what is compatible with your partner and cater to their needs. Recognizing the importance of love languages will not only enhance your partnership, but also reduce the chance of ruining the relationship. If your idea of love doesn’t meet your partner’s expectations or emotional needs then the chances of perpetuating the relationship diminishes and an adjustment should be made; your definition of love should be parallel to your significant other’s interpretation of love. I mean, think about it, am I going to get my point across and communicate effectively with an individual that speaks in a different language than I do?

Take the time to figure out what your primary love language is and see if it correlates with your partner’s outlook on love. You’re allowed to have multiple love languages, the more the merrier; familiarity with more than one language will put you in a better position to progress your relationship. It doesn’t matter if one sounds better than the other, you’re doing this to address and meet your partner’s needs in order to take the romance to new heights and make it work. Respect their desire for affection and the way they wish to be acknowledged to prevent disappointment. Now do your due diligence and use this opportunity to find what resonates with you and apply it to your relationship.

http://peacockplume.fr/lifestyle/should-you-know-your-love-language

The 5 Love Languages

  • Words of Affirmation: This one is quite straightforward since it involves articulating thoughts and diction. The act of listening and uttering words to communicate love can be conducted through either acclamations or compliments. If you find out that the reciprocal love language between both parties is affirmation, then make sure what’s coming out of your mouth is genuine. Voicing “I love you” or “You’re so beautiful” is very basic, but at the same time they’re powerful words; the objective here is to boost their confidence and remind them that they’re special.
  • Quality Time: Most of us learned that we shouldn’t take any moment for granted especially given the current state of affairs. Time is limited and we can’t predict when our last breath will be and when something comes to an end. You can dedicate your time and attention to your partner in a variety of ways, this can be as simple as making great eye contact and conversing with one another. You can even take it up a notch by doing something more thoughtful like planning a sophisticated date, trust me you’ll get bonus points for such deeds. Brush off the constant distractions and just focus on what’s in front of you!
  • Receiving Gifts: This shouldn’t be hard to notice because we all know how it feels to receive a gift and make a gift. Remember the level of exhilaration that filled you on Christmas day? You can emulate that same enthusiasm for someone you love such as your significant other. Regardless of the cost or rarity of the gift, you’re going to induce a bright smile on your partner’s face; it’s not all about materialistic items in this case but rather the sentiment that went into crafting the present. Some ideas may include writing a card of appreciation, purchasing flowers, and sweet pastries. If you want to splurge then by all means, go ahead; either route you decide to choose, your kind gestures won’t go unnoticed.
  • Acts of Service: See the word service? That term has a positive connotation to it, we see it everyday from restaurants to customer service. Making kind contributions and lending a hand speak volumes as to who you are as a person, hence actions speak louder than words. Those who pride themselves in their efforts and productivity most likely belong in this category. This is the route you should take if your significant other enjoys having things done for them. For example, you can run errands, pay the bills, cook a meal, and the list goes on. However, make sure that you’re not being exploited by excessively helping while the other person doesn’t return your affection.
  • Physical Touch: We’ve all held objects and touched people since we were infants because touch is one of our five senses. It’s important to experiment with touch, it can produce a type of energy you find pleasurable. Physical touch is probably the most practical and easiest one to employ; it can be done almost anywhere whether it is going for a hug or leaning in for a kiss at the park, it will spark excitement and a lot of chemistry. Personally, I would take initiative and place my hands on my loved one’s arm while we’re sitting together and having a chat. If you’ve never engaged in tangible activities with your partner then where’s the romance behind the relationship? On the other hand, there’s a fine line between touchy and overbearing; treating your partner like a rag doll or compelling them to do something such as sexual intercourse is not condoned in this scenario.

By: Alex Huang

Alex is a student at the Fashion Institute of Technology majoring in Advertising & Marketing Communications. He used to major in psychology because he didn’t know what to do with his life and now wants to be in the business world. He gets distracted easily by all of the pretty girls in New York City and hopes to become a PR or Marketing manager someday. One of his favorite things to do is going out for bubble tea.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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A Good & Bad Relationship

Tuesday, February 16th, 2021

We can all agree that the idea of a relationship sounds fun and intriguing, but what about the negative side of it? Not only have I seen high quality partnerships, but also toxic relationships– both in real life and online. I understand that people begin the love journey on good terms because they’re genuinely infatuated with one another and can visualize a future together. However, that equal level of attraction and commitment is subject to change; one person could grow more distant or display overbearing deeds, in fact it may be both parties corrupting the relationship. It’s important to keep a couple of points in mind to distinguish between a toxic relationship and a normal relationship. For example, if there are a few disagreements or altercations from time to time then that’s perfectly fine and not much to worry about. We’re all going to encounter conflict eventually, which is part of life and the solution to this is communication with your partner. A stable and beautiful relationship is what we’re all striving for and it takes a great deal of diligence to accomplish that. In the grand scheme of things, note that the quality of one’s relationship is a reflection of their life. 


Oftentimes, we idealize love as the center of happiness and pleasure but don’t see the depths of it. What we don’t know for certain is that the person on the inside matches up with how people see you on the outside, meaning that a whole new persona can be spawned in a different setting. What I mean is that someone could be compassionate and sweet at home, but be the total opposite outdoors through impudent behavior. If you witness something out of the ordinary then please stay on your guard and try to remedy the circumstances, take action before it’s too late. An extensive study with a duration of 12.2 years deduced that those in toxic relationships are more prone to heart problems than counterparts whose relationships are blossoming. I can only provide you with guidelines and insight on what an excellent relationship looks like and the type of relationship you should escape from. Nevertheless, I can’t decide what works best for you as you’ll have to take responsibility and rely on your own judgement.

https://www.powerofpositivity.com/11-signs-relationship-well-even-dont-feel-like/

Signs of a Good Relationship

  • Exchange of Positivity: Having a positive outlook in life goes a long way in creating success; as such, you’ll be able to draw more attention and find new opportunities. Producing that same type of energy will make your significant other feel more special and appreciated. For instance, you can praise them by expressing how much they mean to you. As humans, we seek validation and this applies to your significant other as well so try to brighten up their day.
  • Trust & Support: The structure of a good relationship stems from being able to trust each other and having each other’s back. Your partner should feel comfortable sharing their thoughts and be open to having conversations even if the topic may be sensitive. When you let your walls down, it’s okay to exhibit a vulnerable side of you since the level of love and reverence is mutual. 
  • Affection: It’s crucial to be open to intimacy, they’re fundamental to a romantic relationship. Whether it be physical intimacy or sexual intimacy, the aspect of touching one another is an emblem of the fondness you have for them; they’re all topics that you’ll eventually have to dive into if you wish to sustain the relationship. What’s more is that physical touch is actually one of the five love languages. It doesn’t have to be the sexiest thing in the world, but please give them hugs, hold their hand, kiss them, and put your hand on their shoulder. I’m not implying that PDA is the goal here, but just be considerate and know your timing if you’re surrounded by crowds of people.

Red Flags

  • Secrecy: Now you don’t have to inform your partner everything that happens in your day, what I’m alluding to here is deception. Actions such as lying and attempting to cover up a story will inevitably impair your relationship and lead to a big debacle. For instance, if you suspect that your partner is being protective of her phone or computer then there’s obviously something wrong. Cheating on your boyfriend or girlfriend is very common in society and it’s all the more reason to keep a vigilant eye when something seems peculiar.
  • One-sided & skewed: A relationship comprises two individuals who choose to walk life together and enjoy each other’s company. If one person is making it all about themself while neglecting the other’s wants then walk the other way because it’s called being egotistical, where’s the mutual respect in this? There should be a sense of compromise, one party benefiting over the other isn’t going to work. Don’t let anyone take advantage of you because it’s unethical and you deserve a whole lot better! 
  • Physical & Emotional Abuse: The thought of being tormented can put you in a dark hell if you don’t find an exit. If you believe your partner is deliberately hurting you mentally or physically, be assertive and stay on your toes and I’d say to get as far away as possible and inform authorities; don’t give them the benefit of the doubt and be remorseful if he or she attempts to justify their behavior. Physical acts of violence include choking, pushing, and anything that inflicts damage to you. Meanwhile, emotional abuse can take shape verbally through humiliation, ultimatums, coercion, and more.

Click below to get access to and redeem all Campus Clipper Coupons; coupons are updated weekly


By: Alex Huang

Alex is a student at the Fashion Institute of Technology majoring in Advertising & Marketing Communications. He used to major in psychology because he didn’t know what to do with his life and now wants to be in the business world. He gets distracted easily by all of the pretty girls in New York City and hopes to become a PR or Marketing manager someday. One of his favorite things to do is going out for bubble tea.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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College & Campus Life

Wednesday, February 10th, 2021

The majority of us choose to follow our dreams and pursue a college education after secondary school in the hopes of earning a degree. The first few ideas that I think of whenever I hear about college are fraternities, football games, and pulling all-nighters to study. College students like myself are so focused on building a network, having a social life, and working to boost our GPA that the concept of love gets tossed aside. I am aware that school isn’t the most ideal or feasible option to find a romantic partner, but there are still other approaches to go about it. I rarely ever see couples roaming around campus and flirting with each other since I’ve started college back in 2018; it’s almost as if there’s zero compatibility in a university composed of thousands of students. In a school like the Fashion Institute of Technology where the female population far exceeds the number of males, it becomes a tougher situation due to the unbalanced ratio but the scenario remains the same at traditional schools. 

In the modern world we live in today, there is a greater range of activities to take part in that keep us occupied for most of the day. For example, there is no question that a good fraction of us spend the day glancing at social media such as Instagram and TikTok and exploring parts of a renowned city like New York City. Another equally important aspect that makes romance less of a priority is the set of notions that millennials have embedded in their minds; millennials like myself are attempting to enhance their lives by building our image and refining ourselves both internally and externally. At least 81% of young people embraced being single and were more open to new opportunities. Moreover, we are thrilled with following a timeline that keeps us in check to carry out our duties prior to settling down. As such, I wish to attain a master’s degree and launch my own business before starting a family. All of these goals that we impose on ourselves encompass the idea of self love; from the media and different platforms, it’s important  to love ourselves wholeheartedly so we can be the best version of ourselves, as cliche as it may sound. 

On the other end of the spectrum, the constant presence of the internet lets us do almost anything online. What I’m alluding to is the prominence of online dating which includes applications such as Tinder, Bumble, and Hinge. Nowadays, people don’t really have leisure time to meet people in a social setting given a location like New York City is constantly busy and moving. Convenience makes dating apps a great tool for college students; one can simply jump on the app at any time and swipe left or right until he or she can find someone compatible to connect with. The drawback to these apps is that not everyone is on  there for the same reasons, meaning this isn’t as magical as it might seem. A plethora of students make an account to seek validation, promote their social media, and have one night stands which obviously negate the purpose of a relationship. It’s an arduous task to either begin or perpetuate a romantic relationship while you’re in college in addition to the idea that many are satisfied with being single.

https://thecroutongt.com/blog/2017/4/13/he-swiped-me-into-the-dining-hall-10-tips-for-dating-in-college

College Dating Takeaways:

Overwhelming – Students attend university with the objective of obtaining a degree, it isn’t a freebie or a walk in the park. The agenda for the most part is to attend classes and set sufficient time to study. If you’re coming in with the sole intention of picking up a significant other then you better prepare yourself for disappointment. 

Risk – Don’t spend too much time pondering about love, some will get lucky while others might struggle a bit. If you’re going to put yourself on the internet then you should learn what makes an intriguing profile or else you’re not going to receive any positive results. Trust your intuition and make astute decisions to preclude users with wrong intentions and getting catfished. 


Let it Flow – It’s not impossible to discover a love story in school, the key point here is to keep things natural. Don’t force yourself to be in a partnership with anyone or else nothing will go according to plan. If you develop strong feelings for someone and see potential in them then take a leap of faith. Perhaps take your date out to a fancy restaurant with Campus Clipper coupons like the one below! Click here to view the coupon and make sure to go to the Campus Clipper website for more savings.

You can access and redeem all of our current student coupons here:


By: Alex Huang

Alex is a student at the Fashion Institute of Technology majoring in Advertising & Marketing Communications. He used to major in psychology because he didn’t know what to do with his life and now wants to be in the business world. He gets distracted easily by all of the pretty girls in New York City and hopes to become a PR or Marketing manager someday. One of his favorite things to do is going out for bubble tea.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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