Archive for the ‘onValues’ Category

Box Of Chocolates

Wednesday, October 11th, 2023

Dating is like a box of chocolates in the sense that if I were to only eat chocolate, I’d end up at the hospital with scurvy. 

Old halloween photos. Pretty accurate depiction of how I felt at this stage of my life.

When I first started dating at college I was so caught up in hiding myself. The buzz of putting on the perfect outfit, fixing my hair just right, doing my makeup just right. The anxious excitement waiting outside the fancy restaurants. I’d get a kick out of saying the right thing and always laughing at the right moments. Everything could be in control for those three hours. Everything could be perfect for those three hours. For the evening I was a hologram, projecting a lit up image with big white teeth and temporary charm. I was choosing the most volatile and unreliable part of my life to cling to for stability. Looking to twenty year old men for stability is like being surprised when you light a match in a room full of leaking propane.

I wasn’t eating any potatoes or protein. Both literally and metaphorically, my doctor had to berate me because drugstore ramen noodles are not a source of vitamin C or iron. Turns out the cause of my intense fatigue wasn’t much of a mystery to a professional or my mother, who I wasn’t calling enough either. Metaphorically, I was neglecting the other relationships in my life. Calling my parents made me feel weak. Hearing the voice of the person that kissed me goodnight for eighteen years made the ache in my knees feel more pronounced, and it made the dull pounding in my temple feel like an aneurysm. It was like forcing down unseasoned brussels sprouts. I didn’t want to be aware of how much I was struggling on my own or how much I wanted to be kissed goodnight still. 

Friendships also made me examine myself. Friends saw me anxiously biting my nails before class, and making a joke that nobody heard at dinner, or the time the rain made my eggs and milk fall through my grocery bag on second ave. My friends loved me all the same of course, but I couldn’t hide myself from them even if I wanted to. So I gave up Friday movie nights for candlelit dinners.

I was fixating on dating because it allowed me to craft such a limited image of myself. Who I was under under dim lighting with mellow music was much better than who I was in the harsh light of day. I was neglecting the relationships with people who actually loved me. I was neglecting relationships with inanimate parts of life, like my relationship to health. Preoccupied with trying to be pretty for men, I wasn’t considering that I could be taking pride in knowing my body was well looked after. My relationship to money was strained, in other words, I kept letting money leave my pocket. Most of all I just needed to call home. 

Going on like this made me physically ill. Life has a way of correcting itself though. The best cure for a lack of self-love is a heartbreak.

Don’t get scurvy and eat your greens, 10% off!

Olivia Sully is a Junior studying English Literature at New York University. Olivia spends most of her school and professional life writing and reading, but she likes to decompress with her paintings. 

 For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2023.


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The Universal Language of International Students

Tuesday, October 10th, 2023

Prior to arriving in Dublin, I hadn’t really processed or identified with the idea that I was going to be an international student. Coming from the United States, I recognized that studying in another country that is English-speaking and heavily influenced by American culture is probably not as intense of an experience as studying somewhere that is entirely foreign in both language and culture. However, I quickly came to realize that, even in less obviously foreign places, there are many experiences shared among all international students.

The first example, and perhaps the one that is most difficult to get used to, is the time difference between school and home. Everyone struggles at least a little with homesickness when they go to college for the first time, but there is truly nothing like an 8-hour time difference to throw you into the reality of adulthood. The first few days at school felt a little unreal, but eventually it set in that I wouldn’t be in the same time zone as the rest of my family for another 3-4 months. 

Something that made the experience especially difficult for me was having a boyfriend back home. With busy schedules on both of our ends, and having spent much of the summer together, it was extremely difficult at first to transition to only calling once or twice a week and having the majority of our conversations being just words on a screen. While our communication has strengthened since we first started long-distance, it would be a lie to say it isn’t still difficult to feel such a constant disconnect between us in our periods apart.

What I can say worked best for me to ease the sadness that the distance brings was meeting and spending time with people at school who are going through the same thing. I like to think of it as a sort of universal language between all international students – the homesickness, the struggle to adapt, the stresses of learning how to succeed academically and socially all while in a near completely unfamiliar place. I have found that no matter where other international students come from, there are always things we can relate to each other about over what we have experienced in this new location.

One resource that has been especially helpful to me at Trinity College is the Global Room. The Global Room is a place where many international students can take refuge to ask questions, attend informational events, and even celebrate the holidays of their home countries. One of the first times I visited the Global Room was a Thanksgiving party (a holiday I definitely didn’t realize I’d be going without for a few years). There, I was able to meet many fellow Americans and bond over some familiar holiday foods and gratitude activities.

A craft I did through the Global Room!

I’ve also learned about other cultures through a variety of Global Room events, such as an Irish trivia night and a Teru Teru Bozu-making class (Japanese rain dolls). There is something quite special about bonding with other international students over a shared lack of knowledge about the new place you’re in. Many of my first conversations with my current closest friends revolved around the unpredictable Dublin bus schedules and the expensive prices of toiletry products at Tesco. Even better, as you broaden your network of international friends, you in turn get to learn more about where they are from and what their lives are like back home. 

Overall, whether you are an international student or not, I think there is much room for bonding and meeting people over the shared unfamiliarities of university. Maybe you have the same boring professor, or you’re both struggling to finish the same assignment. Instead of lingering in the difficult and frustrating parts of the college experience, you can use them as opportunities to seek out positive relationships, which will help you further down the road in navigating your path.

Summary:

  • Being an international student can add further difficulties to navigating university life
  • I struggled with the time difference between school and home, especially with having a boyfriend back home
  • Making connections with other international students helped me feel more grounded in my new community
  • The Global Room was a helpful resource to meet more international students and learn more about Irish culture
  • Anyone, international student or not, can form new friendships through bonding over shared struggles

Save on your next grocery trip with this coupon and your student ID!

By Bella Littler

Bella is a second year film student within the Trinity College Dublin / Columbia Dual BA program. She grew up in Iowa, but is currently living and studying in Dublin. On the average day, you can find her watching obscure movies, going on aimless walks around the city, or raving about any and all Taylor Swift lyrics.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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How NOT to Date in NYC

Wednesday, October 4th, 2023

A humble guide to the Do’s and Don’ts of dating in a big city; don’t worry you can’t make as many mistakes as I did.


Instead of waiting for a text, I painted in my sketchbook.
  • Do not get into a car on the fifth date, tenth date, or even the twentieth date. Maybe just avoid cars altogether?

If you are a young person in a city using dating apps, at some point, you will end up on quite a few dates with one person. You may think, I’ve seen enough of this person, and they were really nice and funny at the Chelsea markets and so sweet when we rode the subway to Brooklyn. When they offer to pick you up in a car, and let’s be honest, that’s so exciting because nobody ever has a car in the city, you may agree in a heartbeat. But just because a person is no longer just a profile on a screen, it does not mean you know them! This person may drive thirty minutes outside the city before trying to weasel out of going to dinner as planned. This person may not be a serial killer, but they may still be a jerk and leave you stranded for not being “down” to only chill at their apartment. The taxi may be $70 to get home. 

  • Do meet in public places.

I’m not just saying this because of safety. That part is obvious. I’m saying it because when your family and friends start coming to visit, they are going to ask for the list of food and drink recommendations. You have a responsibility as the recommendation person. Men, women, or people you are dating may come and go, but good Spanish tapas or Indian recommendations will be with you forever. 

  • Do not let the first date be meeting up with a guy + their friends.

You may think meeting up with a guy while he is out with friends means two birds, one stone! Maybe you’ll make a friend or two. Maybe you’ll meet a husband. What it really means, though, is that you end up at some packed bar, with a suspiciously wet bathroom, a rude bartender, and one awkward man and his one awkward college roommate buddy. The guy you are supposed to be on a date with will give up yelling over Sweet Caroline at some point and sit next to you, silently bopping away to the beat. The college roommate buddy will not have uttered a single word in the last thirty minutes. In the end, your ears will hurt, and you will still be a boyfriend short and a friend short. 

  • Do go on friend dates. 

Yes, friend dates are a thing. Plenty of dating apps have a friend option where you match and meet up with people who are just like you- young, alone, and looking to do something fun in a platonic, unromantic, asexual way. Wholesome intentions only. It seems sort of odd to meet people this way, but it is better to utilize dating apps to meet friends than using your date to meet them.

  • Do not rush.

I’m not talking about sororities. Have your Alabama rush week. Just don’t rush dating. Dating may not seem like something you can rush; it isn’t your commute to work or a last-minute essay. Your first date goes well. He texts and asks to see you tomorrow, and you could punch a hole in the wall in an excited way, not an angsty way. Cut to two weeks later when you are eight dates in and telling your parents about him, and he lets you know he leaves back to London tomorrow. He lives in London. He was only visiting New York. 

  • Do treat dating as a meander.

Not a race, not a marathon, maybe not even a stroll, but a meander. Let yourself feel the highs of a great first date. Don’t try to squish the excitement. Meanders are meant for smelling the flowers. Thoroughly smell them for as long as possible; in fact, drag it out over a few days. Drag it out over a week. Drag it out until the high has inevitably faded and your brain chemistry is stable, then plan the second date. If you are meant to be together, then there is no rush. So, make your doctor’s appointments for the year. Clean that one cabinet that has both potatoes and a stack of old mail. Be a happy old woman in her English garden before you go plodding along back to the same rose.


Everybody gets Sushi on the first date. It’s an unspoken rule To Eat Sushi.

Olivia Sully is a Junior studying English Literature at New York University. Olivia spends most of her school and professional life writing and reading, but she likes to decompress with her paintings. 


 For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2023.

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Volunteering In NYC

Friday, September 29th, 2023

Are you looking to volunteer while in New York? Here’s a pasted article from NYC Service with several opportunities for you!

Eliminating Hunger in NYC: If every New Yorker gave one hour a week in an act of service, the result would be transformative. Volunteer to eliminate hunger in your community with a local organization.

Every day, twice a day, volunteers are needed in the Bronx to help deliver nutrition with dignity. Volunteers are an integral part of how POTS creates community and helps clients achieve stability. Sign up here.

Vision Urbana Food Pantry: Help unload trucks, bag and deliver produce, and break down boxes. This food will feed many households in the Lower East Side. Vision Urbana wants to end poverty and hunger by giving back to the community. You can be a part of this by volunteering! Sign up here.

Produce Party: Every Saturday is a Produce Party! Music plays and the vibe is rich as our volunteers prepare the weekly harvest. Grassroots Grocery rescues approximately 10,000 pounds of Fresh Produce which we inspect and package to be delivered to our local community sites through volunteer drivers. Sign up here.

Meal Kit Donations Open: Commonpoint Queens is distributing meal kits this September to vulnerable new Yorkers. Often, the most desired but most challenging items for people in need to find at a food pantry are spices, herbs, and olive oil. Sign up to donate meal kits or volunteer to package the items and distribute with love. ❤️

Volunteer to support people seeking asylum in NYC: The Queens Public Library is looking for Spanish Language IDNYC Translators. Volunteers with fluent or near fluent Spanish skills who can provide assistance to non-English speaking individuals as they complete the IDNYC applications should express interest. Volunteers will help translate questions and answers.

New Neighbors Partnership is looking for New Neighbors Clothing Partnership volunteers. New Neighbors Partnership matches newly arrived refugee families with local families who have older kids and can share ongoing hand-me-downs from season to season. By partnering with a newly arrived family to contribute ongoing hand-me-down kids clothes, you can help a family feel welcomed and supported in their new life here. 

End Street Harassment: Street harassment is a form of violence with roots in different and intersecting forms of oppression. It hurts people and communities by causing fear, anxiety, distrust, and by limiting their mobility. When people feel unsafe in public spaces, they are less likely to spend time outside or join group activities. We all have a role to play in preventing and responding to street harassment. Check out “End Street Harassment: A NYC Resource Guide” to learn ways to prevent and respond to street harassment in the moment or as a bystander, and for supportive tips and resources.

Contact the Tenant Helpline: The Tenant Helpline is a one-of-a-kind tenant resource to inform New York City tenants about their rights and connect them to housing-related resources, including free legal services. The new live call system will be a critical resource for New York tenants who face potential eviction, landlord harassment, or unacceptable living conditions. Call 311 and ask for the “Tenant Helpline”

Get 15% off your order at Street Taco!

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful ebooks, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2023.

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The Benefits of Becoming a Regular

Tuesday, September 26th, 2023

The Dog House, a lovely cafe outside of Dublin that I like to visit on weekends!

One thing you should probably know about me is that I love coffee. I know, real original take from a college student, but I’m going somewhere with this. I love coffee, and I’ve been trying to make it from home most of the time to save a little money, but sometimes at the start of a long day, I just can’t resist getting an iced latte made by someone who knows a lot more about making coffee than I do. 

Last year, chai lattes were the menu item that got me through my early morning lectures and cram study sessions. I discovered a cute café right down the street from my campus called Beanhive that makes the most  incredible vanilla chai latte, along with serving the widest array of muffin flavors that I’ve ever seen. Regardless of whether my day was going terrible or amazing, taking a self-care break to grab myself a warm drink or snack from there always gave me a little extra pep in my step.

Something I feel doesn’t get talked about so much in regard to the college transition is the unfamiliarity in the stores and restaurants you’re newly surrounded by. When moving to Europe for the first time, I was overwhelmed by the unfamiliar names of places and had no clue which store to go to for what (note to future study-abroaders from the US: savor every last trip to Target and Jimmy John’s :’) ). 

Over my first year in Dublin,  I definitely learned and adapted significantly to my surroundings and now could in general tell new students where to go for what they need. However, something that I think would have helped me get adjusted earlier on in the transition is finding stores and restaurants I like and sticking to them on a regular basis.

To reference a small anecdote, my dad is somehow probably 10 times more addicted to coffee than I am. This is to the point that the Starbucks employees recognize him, and I think know a decent amount of his life story as well. For the sake of your wallet, I don’t mean you have to establish yourself this concretely. However, having those regular spots can help you establish a routine early on and feel a little more grounded in your new campus and environment.

There is a wide range of ways that you can incorporate some regular spots into your routine, all depending on your interests and preferences. If you’re a big coffee or tea drinker like me, finding a nice café that’s close to where you live or take classes can be the perfect place to coordinate meet-ups with friends or drop in for some study motivation. Maybe you want to fit in some regular work-outs and get to know your campus gym more. This could even mean finding a secret spot on campus that’s secluded and comfortable, where you can go when you just need a break from everything. Finding “your spot” is all about finding comfort and community in a new and oftentimes stressful environment.


Elevation, a cool pin and poster shop that I have spent way too much money at

Now, I know that exploring campus right off the bat to find a place that’s right for you can seem overwhelming. My first month of college, I alternated between forcing myself to be more extroverted than I’ve ever been in my life and spending way too much time curled up in my room recovering from said extroversion. There’s nothing wrong with taking your time, and everyone deals with the college transition in their own way. You should search for this comfort spot whenever you feel ready and know that you can always try new places out and switch things up if it’s not working for you at first.

Being in different student housing this year, I’m actually in the process of finding some new spots right now. The quest for the best iced vanilla latte in the city is no small undertaking, after all. However, being a little more comfortable with my environment this year, I’m actually excited to explore some new places. After all of the memories I made in my regular spots last year, I can’t wait to see how some new experiences this year will help me continue to thrive in college.

Summary:

  • Finding a regular coffee shop my first year helped me integrate into my new environment
  • There are many ways you can incorporate regular spots into your college experience
  • These spots can provide comfort and support in the unfamiliar
  • You can change places as you grow, and it can be exciting to try new things

Enjoy 15% off a delicious burger or pasta dish with this coupon and your student ID!

By Bella Littler

Bella is a second year film student within the Trinity College Dublin / Columbia Dual BA program. She grew up in Iowa, but is currently living and studying in Dublin. On the average day, you can find her watching obscure movies, going on aimless walks around the city, or raving about any and all Taylor Swift lyrics.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Chapter 2: Hi, I’m Mia! Please Be My Friend!

Monday, September 25th, 2023

Once I had officially decided to go to Pace University, the next step was to find friends and someone I feel comfortable to live with. Pace has a designated building where freshmen live, so I couldn’t live with my friend since they were two years older. Even if I could, though, I didn’t want to. I knew that if I chose to live with someone I already knew, I would be too scared to branch out on my own and I wanted the independence of finding my own friend.

Part of my Facebook post from the Pace Facebook group for incoming freshman

So for the first time in several months (maybe even years), I opened up Facebook and edited my profile before searching for Pace University Facebook groups. The groups are student-made as a way to find fellow incoming classmates and potential roommates. I found two groups, joined both, and began adding almost everyone I thought wasn’t intimidating on Snapchat. Honestly, it felt like a dating app. Sometimes I would hit it off with people, and other times we would say hi and then instantly stop talking.

By June I was getting nervous, because the deadline for finding a roommate was coming up and I still hadn’t really clicked with anyone. It was also important I felt comfortable in my own room and because it was 2020, I wanted to make sure I was living with someone who respected COVID guidelines.

Me and Kathy after we both moved in

A few days into June I received a DM (direct message) from someone on Instagram. At first I was confused as to who this person was, but then I realized they found me from the Pace Facebook group, so I responded to her message. Instantly we clicked. We had all the same interests, were both nervous but willing to meet new people on campus, and were careful with COVID. Kathy (her name) and I ended up chatting everyday and eventually found the rest of our suitemates (the freshmen building had suites instead of just a classic two person or three person dorm).

With my suitemates and I texting each other every day, the idea of going to college seemed less intimidating now that I had more than just one friend. I was beginning to get excited as we all texted each other about what one person was packing, what movies we would watch on movie nights, and what clubs we were all interested in.

Me and a couple of my suitemates

If you’re an incoming freshman, I strongly recommend searching for any type of online group to meet new people. Having some form of established relationships will definitely help ease the anxiety of moving away from home. Even if you eventually find new friends or fall out with the old ones, you will always still have that bond with your freshman roommates. Nothing can take away that old nostalgic feeling of moving in for the first time and taking your first steps into the real world with these people. 

My suitemates and I would attend different events on campus, a lot of them virtual, some of them with social distancing, and together we all found friends. To this day, I’m still friends with my freshman year roommate and suitemate, and I’m forever grateful for them and the steps of courage we took together. We don’t live with each other anymore, but we still support each other and hang out together when we can.

However, I think my suitemates and I did have one unfair advantage that helped us grow close early on. Normal suitemates or roommates have a special bond because they are entering the real world together, but my suitemates and I actually didn’t get to take any steps outside because for two weeks we were all locked in our suite thanks to an increase in COVID cases. That’s right…in October, the entire freshman building got put into lockdown, forcing everyone to stay in their rooms for a whole two weeks.

To this day we still make jokes about how we were all trauma bonded because of this. We had to stay in our rooms, have crappy food delivered to our dorms, and watch movies almost every night to keep us from going insane. COVID may have made our freshman year difficult, but it also gave us a suitemate bond like no other.

I’d also like to mention the fact that, despite my suitemates and I helping each other out with meeting new people, my specific roommate Kathy was like a professional “friend maker.” Almost everyday she was introducing me to someone new. Thanks to Kathy, I met some of my best friends, one being my current roommate in my senior year!

My current roommate (middle), one of my best friends (on the right), and I on Halloween 2020. We all connected thanks to Kathy!

Another tip if you’re an introverted freshman like I was, make sure to meet someone who is very extroverted like Kathy is. This way, you’ll always be meeting someone new and each day will be exciting, and really that’s what every day of your freshman year should feel like. Even if you’re dealing with a global pandemic.

Summary:

  • Why Facebook groups are helpful before going to college
  • Go to events and clubs on campus! It’s the best way to meet friends!
  • Freshman year is all about excitement and meeting new people, don’t be afraid to try new things

Get 10% off any purchase at Baya Bar and enjoy a smoothie or acai bowl! Remember to bring your student ID!

By Mia Ilie

Mia Ilie is a student at Pace University, graduating in May 2024 with a degree in Writing and Rhetoric and a focus on publishing. She grew up in Rockland, New York and is currently living in Westchester, New York where she attends school and works at a local bookstore. You can always find her with her nose in a book or screaming to Taylor Swift with her friends.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Brooklyn Coupon Card Fall 2023

Wednesday, September 20th, 2023
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NYC Coupon Card Fall 2023

Tuesday, September 12th, 2023
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Campus Clipper Coupon Card Spring 2023

Wednesday, March 29th, 2023
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Please Handle With Care

Saturday, August 27th, 2022

Whenever we are shipping or traveling with something fragile, we always label it as such and make sure that the item is handled with the utmost care. Why do we so seldom treat ourselves with the same caution? Items are replaceable, but we—as I hope you know—are not.

I’ve covered a lot of different topics throughout my writing about the COVID-19 pandemic—from being sent home from college, to current events, to relationships, and everything else in between. Truthfully, I could probably write about all the other ways that this unprecedented era of human history intersected with our normal lives, but almost anything you can think of would lead you right back here to a discussion of mental health and self-care—perhaps the greatest lesson that COVID may have had to offer.

Image credit: Pine County, MN, Department of Health and Human Services

Mental health wasn’t really something that I thought deeply about until I got to college. When I look back on high school and think about a lot of my habits—burning the midnight oil to finish my homework, sacrificing sleep, and generally spreading myself too thin—I can’t help but cringe. We’re taught that this is what it means to “work hard,” but it comes at a pretty high cost, especially when you’re young. No one should have to feel like that is the way you need to operate, no matter what stage of life you’re at. You are not the work you do or the grades that you get; your worth is far beyond that, which is something I try to remind myself when I start to believe otherwise. 

I still find myself exhibiting many of these behaviors in college, and it wasn’t until this point in my life where I started to feel physiological responses to my stress or anxiety—heart beating too fast, thoughts racing out of control, worrying about everything. And most of the time, I was concerned more so with how it would affect me academically, not physically or mentally. Yikes.

The pandemic really changed my perspective on mental health, not only showing how important it is to prioritize all aspects of your health, but also pointing out how many of the things we accepted as normal before COVID were deeply flawed. For instance, growing up, it was always expected that you would go to school or to work even if you were not feeling well. If you had a cold, you had to stick it out. If you didn’t sleep well, were feeling overwhelmed, or were burnt out, you had to find a way to get through the day. But now that we have lived through the onset of a deadly, infectious disease, we realize just how ridiculous this kind of behavior is. At school, more and more professors in their syllabi are now encouraging us not to come to class if we feel any inkling of an illness to make sure that we don’t spread it around to others. There is no good reason to force ourselves into doing things when we are not at our best, a mindset we should have adopted long ago.

Now, a lot of my professors have also added mental health provisions to their syllabi, encouraging us to take a day off class if we are struggling mentally and can’t engage with the class. Our student government leaders are pushing to make missing class for mental health reasons count as excused absences. In 2021, a student organization that carries out the mission of the Bandana Project, a national mental health awareness and suicide prevention campaign, was formed on our campus, seeking to provide students with resources for and breaking the stigma around mental health—all it takes is a green bandana to show your support and willingness to engage in the campaign. All of these changes ensure that we never have to feel that our academic career takes precedence over our wellbeing. At the end of the day, we’re at college to learn, not to burn ourselves out.  

Image credit: The Bandana Project
Be sure to check out this amazing organization!

Over the last couple of years, a lot of different stressors in our lives have converged at once: the spread of COVID-19, long periods of isolation, our nation in turmoil, and the general uncertainty of everything, while still having to go to college either online or in person when it became safe again. We are still dealing with the long-term consequences of all of these things, and the pandemic still isn’t really over. But we are all human and we can only expect so much out of ourselves, so if COVID did one thing for us, it was to force us to slow down and reconfigure our thinking to gear ourselves toward what is really important: taking care of ourselves.

So, remember to listen to what your body or your mind is saying—you are the best person to judge your limits and realize what you need at any given moment. Do the things that you enjoy doing, make you happy, and help you to heal—read a book, do a face mask, chill out (just to name a few of my go-to strategies). Totally cliché, but life really is all about balance. It takes effort to unlearn all of the things ingrained into our brains, something that I have still been struggling with, but at the end of the day, just please handle yourself with care.

As I said with my previous chapter regarding relationships, it should not have taken a global pandemic just to learn that we have to take care of ourselves physically, mentally, and emotionally. But I suppose it is better late than never.

A great way to practice self-care is to treat yourself in the health and beauty sphere, so be sure to use this coupon at Trinity’s Touch for all your brow, lash, and skincare needs!

By: Katie Reed

Katie Reed is a senior at Villanova University studying English and Communication. She is in utter disbelief that she just admitted to being a senior. She loves to read, but has made barely a dent in the increasingly large pile of books on her bookshelf that she told herself she would read this summer. She hopes to enter a career in the editing and publishing industry.


For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services. At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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