Posts Tagged ‘college advice’

Dessert Always Comes Last

Tuesday, December 8th, 2020

“But Senior year is going to be amazing,” I say. 

Any time I’m asked about how I’m handling online classes and being away from the NYU campus and my friends, I give the usual answer. It’s okay, could be better, I just wish I was with my friends and could learn in person again. But I always end with what I’ve been clinging to for months now – I’m going to make my Senior year the best it can possibly be.

With a few finals and the spring semester of this year to push through before I get there, I am slowly putting together plans for my last year at NYU with my friends. Lamenting over our lost Junior year this past summer, my friend Leslie and I decided we’d have to put in a lot of effort (and savings) into our last year. 

“If we don’t have the best Senior year, I don’t even know what I’ll do,” Leslie said to me on multiple occasions.

I have to agree. We both felt our freshman year was uneventful and after our time on campus during Sophomore year was cut short by the pandemic, there is a gaping hole left in us, a desire for the New York life that we’ve yet to start living. There is an urgent need to have all the fun we could have had this year, to visit all the places we wanted to but never did. But with a little less than a year to go before we’re there, all we can do is plan.

So far on the agenda: concerts, photoshoots, a quick trip to Canada, and our favorite – lots of going out to eat. When talking with Leslie about the first place we’d go when we’re back in New York, the only place that came to mind was Max Brenner.

Located on Broadway near campus, Max Brenner remains my favorite place to go for dessert. Frankly, I doubt that will ever change. Always in the know about the best restaurants in New York, Leslie first introduced it to me during our freshman year. I fully believe it is one of the places I’ve felt the happiest while living in New York. My first visit there undoubtedly marked one of the happiest moments of my fall semester that year. 

“We’ll go after our History of the Universe midterm, as a treat!” Leslie said, and that is exactly what we did.

As we walked in that night, we took in just how nice the restaurant was. It wasn’t the kind of place you’d need to dress up for per say, but almost everyone there looked well- put together, stylish, and even polished. When we were shown to our seats, we looked at each other and hesitantly shrugged off our coats to reveal our university sweatshirts and jeans. We sat down, trying not to laugh. We had decided to only order dessert and scoured the menu (the very long, very tempting menu), and it was another twenty minutes before we chose what to eat. After taking our order, the waiter left and we spoke about our relief about nearing the end of the semester. Before long, the stress of the midterm we’d taken earlier in the day had faded away and we sat laughing and joking with each other. Then the food arrived, and we felt as though we were in heaven.

I swear I’m not joking. Leslie’s tiramisu came in a small mason jar with a tiny beaker of chocolate syrup on the side. She took one bite and quickly exclaimed, “Oh my god.”

Munchies Waffle from Max Brenner in New York.

The munchie’s waffle (as named on the menu) that I had ordered brought out the same “Oh my god” from me a second later. Two soft waffles topped with whipped cream, vanilla ice cream, and hazelnut sauce drizzled over. A small beaker of chocolate syrup. On the side, a bowl of tiny, crunchy chocolate balls to sprinkle over. A light dusting of powdered sugar on top. After dressing the waffles with the sides, I took my first bite. It melted in my mouth.

If anyone heard our loud proclamations about the delectable desserts we were eating, they didn’t say anything. If someone thought we were being paid to act, they wouldn’t have been without reason. Maybe we were just too stressed or maybe we were simply starving, but either way we could not stop gushing about how good it was. It became a night to remember, and ever since I’ve considered Max Brenner one of my happy places.

“That’s how I want to feel all of Senior year,” I told Leslie recently when we were making more additions to our plans. 

It’s a high expectation to have, but one I’ll do anything to fulfill. After such a hectic past few months with the pandemic and online classes, it is all I can do to keep myself going and have hope. But what can we do while we wait for that special time? Here are some tips I found from the Self website:

  • Have a Calendar – The Self website recommends having a calendar and writing down anything you think you would look forward to. This can be small things like the airing of the next episode of your favorite TV show, or the release of your favorite musician’s album.
  • Special Events – Create special events for yourself, and these also don’t have to be big! Something like saving a certain food or movie for weekends or for a day when you know you’ll need them can help.
  • Entertainment – Keep yourself occupied with those favorite shows, movies, music, books, video games, or anything else you thoroughly enjoy. While we pass the time during the pandemic by avoiding unnecessary outings, keeping yourself happy through these things is essential. 
  • Looking Ahead – At this point almost everyone has plans for what they’ll do when the pandemic ends, but if you don’t I highly recommend you make some! Having something to look forward to, even if you get a bit of tunnel vision about it like I sometimes do, is essential. Whether it’s just looking forward to graduating, or maybe a vacation, or maybe even a concert – find a future event to plan and hold onto it. 

In the meantime, we have to make do with remote learning and meeting up with friends over FaceTime. I keep telling myself that dessert always comes last, but it comes. It just requires patience. For now we’ll hold onto those special moments and our future plans. My mind keeps coming back to Leslie and I in our gray NYU sweatshirts, laughing in Max Brenner and eating little bites of heaven. We’ll get there again.

If you’re eager to have your dessert now though, Campus Clipper offers some helpful coupons such as the one below! Click here for the link.

You can find all of our active coupons at this link. Redeem them here:


By: Anaïs Nuñez-Tovar

Anaïs is currently a Junior at New York University and is majoring in English with a minor in Creative Writing. Her goal for the future is to work in the publishing industry and write on the side. She loves to write and read poetry and fiction in her spare time.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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The Era of Comfort Food

Tuesday, December 1st, 2020

The first time my friend Maria and I shared a meal together we went to a Mexican restaurant on University Place. Truthfully, neither of us remember the name, likely because we never felt compelled to return there later on. The food was decent, perfectly acceptable, nothing without flavor. But we were both looking for something else. Maria wanted more of the traditional cooking that her Mexican parents, particularly her mother, would make for her. I was looking for more of the Tex-Mex angle that I favored, being from Texas. We were inevitably disappointed because either way, the restaurant could not provide the comfort Maria got from her mother’s cooking and I from my favorite Tex-Mex restaurants back home.

Comfort foods are named for their helpful properties, for their ability to provide just a little relief from whatever stressor may be occupying your mind. In these past few months since the pandemic started, it only makes sense that we might all be craving our favorite comfort foods more than usual. 

Talking with Maria recently about it, I learned more about how she has noticed a change in her relationship with her comfort foods. 

“What do you think constitutes a comfort food?” I asked her first. 

On the small screen of my phone I watched her pause to look up at the ceiling before answering, “Probably something that makes you feel, like, warm inside physically, or in a way that brings back fond memories,” she said, “any foods that take you back to a time when you felt good.”

I agreed completely. The point of comfort foods is to do exactly this – make you feel comforted, make you feel warm and of course happy memories are probably attached to a lot of these.

“What are some of your favorite comfort foods?” I asked her next.

“Anything my mom makes, for the most part. Actually, a lot of breakfast foods that she makes. Chilaquiles, or eggs with chorizo or potatoes. They’re all simple foods. Sometimes just a tortilla spread with beans, then some cheese and salsa can be amazing. A lot of times it’s just whatever we eat whenever there’s nothing else.” 

In Maria’s words: “Huevos rancheros con chilaquiles, y frijoles fritos con chorizo.”

We both laughed at that, and I completely understood what she meant. One of my own favorite comfort foods is what my mother calls “estrellitas,” “estrellita” meaning “little star.” It’s a simple, light tomato soup with star pasta, but it never fails to warm me.

“Okay, and how much access did you have to your comfort foods while we were on campus in New York?” I asked.

Maria gave me a look and I laughed. 

“You know,” she said, and I laughed harder.

“Yeah, I do,” I said, recalling a time she dragged me with her on a long subway ride to Queens.

“Yeah, to get the good stuff, the real stuff, I have to go to Brooklyn or Queens. I have to find a panaderia there, and somewhere I can get chorizo, too. So in other words, not a lot.”

“What about the pandemic? How has your relationship to food changed during the pandemic?”

She frowned for a second but then shrugged. 

“Honestly, it’s just nice to be able to have my mom’s cooking again, to be able to eat those comfort foods every day. But then also, since I recently moved in with my friend it’s kind of like New York again, I don’t get it as much. Sometimes though she has my brother send some over. And sometimes I just beg her to make someone send me some.”

I nodded along, then asked, “Have you noticed yourself craving your comfort foods more during the pandemic?” 

“Hmm, not necessarily? But also, I’m just really appreciative of the fact that I can eat my mom’s cooking. Obviously I normally wouldn’t be able to during the school year. I’m just trying to savor it in the limited time I have. And it saves me a lot of stress, time, and money to be able to eat what she makes.”

Comfort food, as I learned after this brief conversation with Maria, is oftentimes food that is not easily accessible. This could very well be the case for you, too. Whether it be the resources or the chef, it usually takes an outside factor to help provide the beloved meal. When craving something you enjoy that you are unable to get to, especially during a highly stressful time such as now, it can then be difficult to cope. I decided to include a link to an article on some other ways you can comfort yourself, such as talking things out, meditating, and even things as simple as taking a shower.

Remember it is okay to take the time you need to comfort or care for yourself. In fact, it’s necessary. To avoid burnout and overall exhaustion, check in on yourself and make sure you give yourself the breaks you need. If you find yourself wanting to order take-out to do so, Campus Clipper has a variety of coupons to pick from to help you out, such as the one below! Click here to view the coupon, and make sure to go to the Campus Clipper website to explore more. 

KC Gourmet Empanadas Coupon on the Campus Clipper website.

You can find all of our active coupons at this link. Redeem them here:


By: Anaïs Nuñez-Tovar

Anaïs is currently a Junior at New York University and is majoring in English with a minor in Creative Writing. Her goal for the future is to work in the publishing industry and write on the side. She loves to write and read poetry and fiction in her spare time.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Missing Life in New York (Especially the Pho)

Tuesday, November 24th, 2020

Displacement, disappointment, dissatisfaction. It’s fair to say that I am not the only one experiencing these feelings during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mid-semester of my sophomore year I was sent home to do online learning like many other students this past Spring. The virus took everyone by surprise, but its impact on college students is a unique one. For many students, learning at home is not only difficult but also dismal. No longer on campus, one misses out on the most vital aspects of college – lively discussions with peers, spending time with friends, and the chance to explore the city. Miles from New York, missing my friends from NYU and struggling to stay on the ball with classwork, I’ve found that this semester cannot be described with words. Instead imagine a very deep, very tired-sounding sigh. 

But I’m trying to change that.

After a particularly busy past week (two novels to read, an outline for a paper due, and starting on a presentation for Spanish class, so on), I decided I’d order Vietnamese this weekend, pho in particular. We are nearing the end of the semester which means papers, projects, and other major assignments are flooding in, all due within days of each other. Food of course being my favorite way of treating myself, I let myself have at it. Having recently moved from home to across the state, I’m not familiar with many restaurants where I am now, but I’ve been craving pho and have been on the search for a reliable pho restaurant. As it turns out, one wouldn’t expect it but the second-best pho I can now claim that I’ve had is from a small eatery in the food court of a nearby mall, Pho Kitchen. Second-best. 

Maybe I’m lying a bit to myself. To be completely objective – the pho was absolutely delicious. I sat in the food court, mask placed to the side and socially distanced (which was a good thing, or people probably would have heard me slurping up the noodles and soup), and added a little Hoisin sauce and sriracha to the broth, mixing it in alongside the noodles, beef, onion, and cilantro. I squeezed a lime over it to top it off, stirred a little more, then dug in. The beef was perfectly tender, the broth flavorful and warm, and the noodles not too hard or too soft. All and all, completely satisfying. Why was it second-best then, you may be wondering?

It wasn’t PhoBar. PhoBar, which my friend Leslie introduced me to in our Freshman year, is located very close to Washington Square Park and was conveniently only a little ways away from our residence hall. I had had a cold and at that time it was just slightly more socially acceptable to go out to eat when visibly sick. We sat at a shared table and having only tried pho once before and disliking it, I wasn’t sure what to order or how to feel. 

“Just get the classic beef pho,” Leslie said, and I followed her orders.

Classic Beef Pho from PhoBar in New York City.

It turned out to be the cheapest item on the menu, which made it even better, but truthfully, it couldn’t have possibly gotten better. Even through my congestion and with what little ability I had left to taste, I was floored by the flavors of every part of the soup. Very quickly, just after a few bites and sips of broth, I became a passionate fan of pho. Leslie and I returned to PhoBar frequently after that and it is still one of our favorites.

When I was craving pho last week then, maybe it was more than just the soup I was yearning for. After all, I thoroughly enjoyed the meal I had, so all that was really missing was the fact that I wasn’t at PhoBar with Leslie. I wasn’t in New York.

Pho here will never be as good as pho in New York for that very reason. And on the same lines, online classes will never be as fulfilling as going to class on campus. Life in New York will always feel at least slightly superior to life anywhere else.

One could say that feeling discontent with this semester would be inevitable due to all that is happening, namely the pandemic. But in another attempt to try to grin and bear it, no matter how tiring it may be to keep grinning, I am doing my best to push through online classes and keep up with what is due. However, this is undoubtedly difficult. A few friends of mine themselves are going through rough patches and find themselves unmotivated. If you find yourself in the same position, here are a few helpful tips from U.S. News on dealing with online classes: 

  • Form a Schedule – Oftentimes having a solid structure to your day can help with keeping things in line and therefore getting more work done. Try writing out or printing a schedule, hang it up somewhere you will see it, and do your best to adhere to it throughout the day. 
  • Find Your Space – If you have a very busy home, it’s best to find a quiet area in your house to minimize distractions. If this isn’t possible, try going to your local library or somewhere you can get away from whatever may be pulling you away from your work.
  • Eye on the Prize – It may be difficult, I know for a fact that it is very difficult for a few friends of mine, but it is important to have a goal you want to reach and therefore a reason to get yourself to do work. “I’m just trying to get this degree,” is something a friend of mine says all the time, and I think it’s a simple but important mantra for many of us to take up during this time.
  • Stay in Touch – As for missing out on social interaction, use FaceTime or something of the like to keep in touch with friends from college. My friends and I use an app to send video updates to each other and it’s proven to help us a lot. Not only do we get to hear about what’s going on in each other’s lives, but it’s nice to see the faces and hear the voices of the people who I lived with for almost a year, who I care about deeply.

For more information, click the link above. Keep in mind that these things may not come easily or could be difficult to implement in your life. This is perfectly okay. It is more about the effort you put into doing better than how far you may actually get. I myself feel that it’s rare to have an actual productive day, but when I do I let myself savor the moment. It’s these moments that help me get through the semester. When you have that day (and you will), make sure you savor the moment, too.

You can find all of our active coupons at this link. Redeem them here:


By: Anaïs Nuñez-Tovar

Anaïs is currently a Junior at New York University and is majoring in English with a minor in Creative Writing. Her goal for the future is to work in the publishing industry and write on the side. She loves to write and read poetry and fiction in her spare time.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Fancy Fridays: Making Traditions

Wednesday, November 18th, 2020

By the second semester of my Sophomore year, it was firmly established that my friends and I needed something to look forward to, and not just big events. To weather the storm of stress caused by regular classes, major assignments, and jobs, we needed a weekly treat; something small; something to hold us over until the following week. My friend Leslie coined the phrase “Fancy Fridays” to describe it. At the center of our newfound tradition? Something mouthwatering. 

It was very simple. Just a good meal, whether cheap or expensive, it didn’t matter, though sometimes we had to reign ourselves in and not splurge too much. At the heart of the tradition though was our need to take time for ourselves, to treat ourselves. For this reason, we often excused spending more than we should have (and this probably occurred way more than it should have). “What’s for dinner Friday?” became a question worthy of major debate. What were we craving? How much were we willing to spend? It varied each week, but we always chose a meal that brought the relief we needed. 

Some of our go-to meals: Wings from Atomic Wings, ranging from plain to super-spicy, because our tolerances differed. An Indian food feast from Leslie’s and my favorite Indian restaurant we accidentally discovered the year before. Pepperoni pizza from Joe’s, which was just a few steps from our residence hall. Joe’s was especially important to us. When we had sudden cravings at 1:00 a.m, we could easily slide from the couch, go down the elevator, through the lobby, and be at their doorstep in less than 5 minutes. In retrospect, maybe it was a little too accessible. 

But there is one Fancy Friday meal that we all still talk about to this day. On Valentine’s Day weekend, three-quarters of us single, we decided to go all out and make a reservation at Irvington, a lavish restaurant nearby. Truthfully, this didn’t occur on a Friday, but rather the day after. We postponed for a day and then when Saturday night came, we made it a hell of a time. Those of us who never wore makeup put some on, we all picked out a nice outfit, and when we were finally ready we walked up Union Square and entered – the W Hotel.

Unknown, “Irvington Restaurant – New York, NY”, https://www.opentable.com/r/irvington-new-york . Accessed 17 Nov 2020.

So there was some confusion at first. We stood in the hotel lobby, feeling foolish and whispering to each other before we realized the restaurant was within the hotel. Soon enough we spotted it (it was just to the side, and in our panic we missed it), we gave the name the reservation was under, and we were seated. The meal was fantastic.  The waiter was so nice, we still remember his name. And overall, we got our moment. We were able to let our hair down and enjoy ourselves.

At the end of the day, after some takeout and a movie or fine-dining and a stroll through the city, the only thing that mattered was that we got the relief we so badly needed, week to week. It was a breath of fresh air, a true moment of peace to be able to sit and savor something delicious and do nothing more. Our Fancy Fridays were truly our saving grace in a sea of school stress.

Even if it is not centered on a meal, it’s important to form traditions during college for the same reason – it will give you something to look forward to and bring you a moment of relaxation. So what are some ways you can form traditions, whether it’s with your friends or just for yourself?

  • Find something you enjoy – Relaxation will likely come from doing something you like, whether it’s a serious hobby or something small. For my friends and me, eating something delicious was always an easy way to decompress. Even something as simple as watching a movie or show can make for a simple but effective tradition. 
  • Put in the effort – The goal of these traditions is to find some inner peace if only an ounce. If you have to pull yourself away from readings and papers, do so. Especially if you feel you are already running low on energy. The only way to relax is to set aside time to do so. This could apply to purposefully search for something you enjoy as well. It may feel like a bother, but knowing that once you find something to do that will ultimately relax you, it will be worth it.
  • Let it happen – Not just the name of an amazing Tame Impala song. Yes, this pretty much completely goes against my second point, but it’s still relevant! Sometimes traditions come about by themselves. Notice what’s going on in your life that you enjoy, or things you are doing that you’d like to keep up. Go with it and see if this works for you.

Lastly, if you are looking to make food a part of your new tradition, Campus Clipper has some amazing coupons to help you out! Here is one for Amorino Gelato:

https://www.campusclipper.com/new/popup1.php?CUP_COD=3876

You can find all of our active coupons at this link. Redeem them here:


By: Anaïs Nuñez-Tovar

Anaïs is currently a Junior at New York University and is majoring in English with a minor in Creative Writing. Her goal for the future is to work in the publishing industry and write on the side. She loves to write and read poetry and fiction in her spare time.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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The Diary of a College Student: Adjusting to Life Off-Stage and into the Lecture Hall

Monday, April 2nd, 2018

In having been an actor for over 10 years of my life the adjustment that I experienced in not pursuing acting further in college was interesting, to say the least. Before that, life had been a world of opportunity in the sense that anywhere could have been a stage upon which to demonstrate my craft, my commitment, my skill, etc..

Upon arriving in New York City as a freshman college student, I found myself searching for something new around which to center my life. Something that could fill the void I felt inside me. I wanted to substitute something for the hours of intense training, detail-oriented rehearsals, and a creativity that was conditioned to image the sufferings and joys of human existence. I was in the process of reimagining my life, adjusting to my new life off-stage, in lecture halls, and among unfamiliar peers; in the manner that I would live, the activities that I would pursue daily, the motivation that I felt that pushed me toward always becoming better than what I was the day before, etc.. I believe that this time, a time of life re-imagined, can relate to, and is shared by, those who experience a dramatic shift in their day-to-day routines, their sense of limitation, and their sense of liberty when choosing what to prioritize in life.

This especially applies to college students, namely Freshmen, who recently removed themselves from a familiar environment full of routine and safety. In attending an out-of-town, an out-of-state, or international university, students are faced with the difficult task of taking what they knew as life and drastically reimaging it to suit their needs in their new localities. The difficulties arises from temptation. Temptation that is reinforced by the general newfound liberty of independent living. Spiderman taught me at a young age that “with great power comes great responsibility,” and it is a fact of human existence that ameliorating one’s liberty of choice, freedom of expression, and right to self-determination is directly relatable to one’s sense power.

So in here lies the subject of responsibility. What this essay aims to make palpable is the difficulty that exists in maintaining one’s sense of responsibility and pragmatism during this time of life re-imagined. Before, we discussed the opportunities college students have in trying to find the best student deals, spark new relationships, curate better hygiene, etc. when in an unfamiliar place, such as attending a new school. However, it is this greater realization of the individual’s power of choice that is the true subject of this discourse. I don’t want to sound cliché, but for new college students, there is no greater excitement then determining exactly what it is that makes you happy and using those sources of happiness to your advantage.

Image Credit: http://www.scei.edu.au/news

The overwhelming nature of arriving in a different city, into a situation where there are no longer limits on the things you can try, or finding where those things will begin generally brings anxiety with it. It is good to feel that anxiety, because it means that you value what your life is and your happiness in living it. If I could go back and tell myself a tidbit of advice freshman year, I would tell him this: there is no greater opportunity missed than living a life that prioritizes your health, your happiness, and your ability to make patient deliberated decisions. That may seem like an Olympian sized feat, but it begins with the littlest of things. For example, when one prioritizes their health and ability to focus and deliberate, than drinking the night before a test perhaps wouldn’t even enter one’s mind as a viable option.

Image Credit: https://www.pragmait.com/therapyboss/blog/short-term-or-long-term-goals-still-required/

It may seem a little extreme. However, when I was adjusting to my life off-stage there were many decisions that I see now as being nothing but a hindrance on my overall goal of being happy. I was more concerned with my momentary happiness and less concerned with prioritizing my long term goals.  It is easy to try and find the most exciting thing to do as a young new college freshman or sophomore, but it is all too easy to get caught up in the overwhelming liberty that comes with newfound independence. Always prioritize the life you want to be living and don’t simply live in the moment, and I promise that your life re-imagined will be a rewarding one to live.

By James Rodriguez


A Texan born and raised, James Rodriguez grew up in San Antonio TX, and has recently graduated from New York University, having studied corporate and political publicity. He sings, plays guitar, studies French, etc. in his free time, and when given the opportunity to share advice that he thought noteworthy with future or current college students, he jumped on the chance. He believes that there is something incredibly important in obtaining knowledge from those who are going through or have recently finished dealing with the difficulties one is seeking advice on. Which is exactly the aim of the Campus Clipper: to share the best advice possible in order to better the experiences of students who are struggling now. Because he was once that lost college student who was searching for instruction and who felt out-of-place and in need of direction, he hopes that his words can relate to someone’s struggle and help along the way. 

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

 

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How To Lose a Roommate in 4 Months

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

College roommates are tricky, especially in New York where space is limited, buildings are old, and once you’re off campus you’re living in a real world environment with real adults. As I approach 2 years in New York, I look back on all 4 of my roommates and wonder where it went wrong and where it went right.

 

1. Rooms Don’t Clean Themselves

As cool as it would be to sing a little tune and watch the cockroaches scattered about your apartment team up to tidy up à la Enchanted, this has yet to happen to me and boy have I tried. Freshman year, the cleaning in my suite was wistful thinking. Piles of dishes in the sink and beyond sported food remnants caked on like it had grown there. The stench was rivaled only by the trash, which filled every empty trash-looking container we had. A pile of unclaimed broken glass lasted over a week in a corner. The K-Mart Brand Swiffer was the only thing not dirty, it stood untouched next to the kitchen as a woeful reminder. I don’t really blame our suite of six girls – we were busier than ever, more independent than ever, and I guess more content to live in filth than I ever will be again. Early on we all claimed ourselves as clean people and concluded that there was no further need to discuss how we were going to keep each other honest and it spiraled from there. So my advice to you? Set up expectations and a cleaning schedule. Go buy cleaning supplies before you need them. And though we all have that laundry chair, just make sure there isn’t rotting food under all those clothes.

 

2. Talk in Person

The digital age makes communication much more accessible, but when it come to the person sleeping in the same room as you, it’s best to address things about your shared living space in your shared living space. Sure the occasional “Can you make sure my straightener is off?” isn’t going to do you any harm. But when you are sitting 12 feet from each other all afternoon, you shouldn’t receive a text about how they would prefer if you didn’t have people over on Wednesdays 2 minutes after you walk out the door. As someone who spent a semester living with that person, I would find myself falling into a trap of replying to these long texts about things that made her uncomfortable instead of bringing it up face to face. Learning to stand up for yourself or addressing a situation in person can be hard, but it’s always the best route to go. Otherwise, four months into living with someone you’ll get a text as you walk out the door saying that this living situation is no longer working for them, and you never see them again.

 

3. You Deserve Your Space Too

Maybe you’ve been graced with the perfect roommate whose schedule and friends fit perfectly with yours. I was not that lucky. One of my roommates was so adamant about never having people over to our apartment that on the occasional Saturday I did, she’d shut herself in her room despite my attempts to be friendly and socialize. There’s a difference between being a good roommate and a huge pushover. As much as I wanted to respect her space, I also felt I deserved to hang out in my own apartment every once in a while. Of course, there are times where it’s okay to request space from your roommate and all their friends, as long as this isn’t 100% of the time. It would have been unrealistic for me to be paying for an apartment that I was never in because my roommate didn’t allow people over. Living the early 20s adult life is all about learning to compromise and respect peoples living spaces on both sides.

 

4. Make a Friend

After you’ve sorted through the kinks of living with someone, it’s important to think about how you get along as people. A roommate can be just some person you share a living space with, or they can be someone you think of as a part of your home. Despite your own busy life, don’t forget to take a moment to talk to your roommate at the end of the day or even make plans with them every once in a while. The person you’re living with can have a drastic effect on how comfortable you are in your own home, and friendly conversation can bring things to a whole different level.

 

Looking for a way to get to know your new roomie? Have a Spa Day at IL Girasole! Whether it’s mani pedis before brunch or facials before a Friday night out, with your Campus Clipper coupon and Student ID you can get 15% all the time on any of their services.

Image Credit: campusclipper.com

Image Credit: campusclipper.com

 


By Caroline Flynn

Caroline Flynn is a Sales and Publishing Intern at the Campus Clipper studying Theatre at NYU Tisch. Caroline is passionate about the arts and dedicated to using her voice to make other people smile. As she heads into her Junior year, she is excited to be writing about how relationships have shaped her life while she takes on summer in the city for the first time. Check out her Instagram for more witty and heartfelt content on her life. 

We have the most talented interns ever and we’re so proud of them! For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015. 

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My Vegetarian Story

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

Coming to university brings about changes in one’s character as well as in one’s way of thinking. For many, it is the first time we are living by ourselves, the first time we are in charge of every aspect of our everyday lives: from doing homework, to what we eat, to choosing to go to class, to deciding whether we brush our teeth. It is stressful to suddenly make this transition, but in my experience, it has made me all the more conscious of myself as a person, my needs and my desires. People tend to focus on different things, depending on who they are. When I came to university, I found that my focus was my relationship to food.

www.thepcrm.orga

www.thepcrm.orga

I had always enjoyed eating well. “Well” as in healthy and delicious, as my mother had taken up the task of teaching me about the effects of food on my health from a young age. Nonetheless, coming to university was the first time I became truly conscious of what I was putting into my body. I had always known that eating a salad was better than eating a cake, and I was aware of the benefits of each vegetable and food group, but the idea that what I was putting into my body impacted my being in such a strong way hadn’t settled in too much. You could say I was superficially aware of the importance of a good diet.

This all changed when I arrived in New York City and was forced to make all the choices myself. Perhaps this development sprung from having to cope with leaving my mother’s kitchen, where everything was cooked with the freshest Greek ingredients in a healthy way. To go from that to my school’s dining hall, whose salad bar was tasteless and whose prepared dishes all usually contained meat and ten times the amount of oil and/or butter necessary was a rude awakening.

www.oralanswers.com

www.oralanswers.com

I realized that since I was now in charge of myself, I soon had to be more conscious of what was in my disposition. Upon having this epiphany, I started watching documentaries and reading books on health. Soon enough, I realized that for who I am as a person, being healthy and aware of my nutrition meant giving up meat and a lot of dairy. I became convinced that a whole food, plant-based diet was the best thing I could do for myself. And surely enough, all the benefits people from the vegan community boast about became relevant for me too.

http://fattofitwwdiary.tumblr.com/post/71598319865/untitled-via-tumblr-on-we-heart-it

http://fattofitwwdiary.tumblr.com/post/71598319865/untitled-via-tumblr-on-we-heart-it

Most of the documentaries and books I read were targeted at people trying to make the switch to a vegan diet. Though I am not fully vegan, I am fully vegetarian and eat vegan about 70% of the time. I found that what resonated with me was not simply the health benefits of a whole foods diet, rather, the compassion the community argued for when it comes to animals. Adopting a whole food, plant-based diet was not only crucial for my health, as I felt my energy levels rise, my skin clear up, my hair get stronger and my mood improve, but it was also crucial for my sense of wellbeing and self-esteem.

After being exposed to the atrocity of what is the meat and dairy industry, I felt a lot of guilt when I engaged in activities which contributed to these disastrous causes. That’s when I realized that what I put into my body was not only important for my body’s health in regards to protein, carbohydrates, healthy fats, nutrients and minerals but also to my mind for the person I wanted to be. So, I made the choice to try to do my part for our planet and the animals and try to do the least “bad” I could. For me, it meant giving up meat completely and minimizing my dairy intake to only a few times per week (usually weekends).

www.lolwot.com

www.lolwot.com

I struggled with the idea that I wasn’t doing the most good I could. I told myself that my ultimate goal was to be completely vegan and in that way, be “perfect”. However, I soon realized that these thoughts were holding me back, as I was not seeing that what I was doing was already a positive change. What I realized was that there was no one way to eat and that actually, what was needed were people who were aware and determined to make the right choices most of the time. My lifestyle and diet were my way of reacting to the information I was given. Chances are, you will have a different experience, and it will not be better or worse than someone else’s, as long as you remember to show compassion and strive to be aware of your body to make the right choices, whichever they may be.

www.pinterest.com

www.pinterest.com

Interesting reads:

  • Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer
  • Skinny Bitch by Rory Freedman and Kim Barnouin

Helpful documentaries:

  • Forks Over Knives
  • Cowspiracy
  • Food Matters
  • Food Choices

 

By Marina Theophanopoulou

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Marina Theophanopoulou is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is studying Philosophy and Sociology as a junior at NYU. Passionate about healthy, food and wellness, Marina aspires to make others think of food in a more holistic way. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services. 

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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The Transfer

Saturday, July 19th, 2014

Remember when you were in high school? Yes, it was fun. But one of the things you looked forward to the most was eventually going to college. And if you didn’t plan on going to college, you still likely planned on doing something with your life. It was so comforting, wasn’t it? Envisioning finally being an adult and all the independent choices you would be able to make. It’s such an endorphin rush…until you’re finally there, in college or the harsh real world, where making choices can be stressful and costly. If you are like me, you may have found yourself simply lost at first.

Choosing a major is hard and so is choosing a school. Thankfully, I already knew I was passionate about history. It was my second best option next to fashion designs which after the market crash of 2008, I didn’t really see as an option at all. I figured, I would eventually find my foothold in fashion, the natural way. But in school, I would major in history. I would write. I’m a writer. Eventually, I would write for a magazine, a fashion magazine, as a fashion editor. Then I would transition, like Vera Wang did. Somewhere in the back of my mind, I always knew I would come back to New York. And that’s easily the best thing that’s happened to me this year as a student. Coming back to New York – not the actual move, because (when isn’t that stressful?), but reacquainting myself with air of New York life.

Yes, it sounds like another anecdotal cliché of a young woman’s life – that New York would be the place where she finds herself and comes into her own.  Well, that’s the thing. I’m not sure I’ve figured it out just yet, like these women do in those clichés. And considering that I’m at the very beginning of my career, I probably won’t figure out everything that I’d need to for a while. But something about being in New York at this stage of my life is great and exciting. Perhaps, it’s being surrounded by so many like-minded people. It’s the vibe we’re able to create, the conversations, the momentous impact we tell each other we want to have. The energy of the city just feeds youthful aspirations, which means, I can still make mistakes. There’s so much room to explore just who I want to be.

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Margael St Juste, Hunter College ’15

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