Posts Tagged ‘job search’

My First Internship: How I Got Paid to Eat Gourmet NYC Food

Wednesday, March 24th, 2021

As I entered my sophomore year at NYU, I was feeling pressure to get an internship. I had spent the summer working in a restaurant in my hometown, collecting tips and saving them all for my semester abroad. While this was a perfectly normal and productive way to spend my first summer at college, I still worried that I was inadequate compared to my NYU peers who interned for hedge funds or theater companies. 

I came into Welcome Week sophomore year determined to land my first internship (or on-campus job). I was in the weeds trying to figure out work-study when an upperclassmen friend of mine posted in our sorority Facebook group about a job opportunity in public relations. My friend, Chehak, edited and polished my resume, then gave it to the PR company with her glowing recommendation. After a fairly straightforward phone interview, I was offered the job. I realize now that this experience is like an actor saying they landed the gig on their first audition—it would never happen again.

My Instagram story from my last day in the office

I dressed up for my first day but was surprised to find my supervisor wearing a flowy maxi dress and flip-flops. The office was in WeWork Williamsburg. I was amazed by WeWork, with beer on tap, fancy snacks, and trendy couches where people seemed to be lounging and working simultaneously. Huge windows poured light onto the coworking tables. The offices didn’t even have walls—just windows. It was a modern start-up world, completely different from any New York office I had seen in the movies.   

My position was at RVD Communications, a boutique public relations firm. Most of our clients were NYC restaurants and bars. I didn’t realize at the time how great I had it with this internship—I got paid weekly, including an unlimited monthly MetroCard, and I got to attend press and influencer events at some of the best restaurants in the city. I worked 15 hours a week, including a full day on Fridays. 

The best part of the job was working with my fellow interns, two NYU students who would become some of my closest friends. Each Friday, the three of us would claim one of the restaurant-style booths in the WeWork common space and spend the day there, giggling and sharing stories about the frat boys we were hoping to see that weekend while creating Pages presentations for the account leaders to present to clients.

A delicious churro I sampled while working an event at a Times Square food market

Many of New York’s food holiday markets are run by the same company, Urbanspace, which was one of our clients. I found the Bryant Park Holiday Market by accident my freshman year when I went to the New York Public Library to study. I was enchanted by this little world full of lights, art, hot chocolate, and lots and lots of food. Needless to say, I was ecstatic when my fellow interns and I were asked to work a press and influencer event at the opening weekend of the Bryant Park Holiday Market. For these types of events, we invited journalists and Instagram influencers to come to the market, take pictures, and write articles. Our job as interns was to track mentions of our clients on Instagram and online publications. At the event, however, we were given press passes and allowed to roam the market, trying dishes from every stall. We pretended to be influencers, taking photos and videos with our Belgian fries, mozzarella sticks, and Korean-style tacos. Even though I did not end up pursuing a career in PR, I am so grateful for my experiences in the industry. I learned how to speak up for myself in a professional environment and how to balance interning with schoolwork. Best of all, I got to eat some great food.

Tips: On finding your first internship and being successful in the workplace

  • Reach out to upperclassmen you know from class or the clubs you are involved with. Upperclassmen can become great mentors and great friends.
  • Don’t be picky. You are trying to get experience working in a professional environment in New York City. That experience could be in a variety of fields. I didn’t expect to work in public relations, but I ended up having a great time.
  • When communicating with your new supervisor(s), be clear about your work and school boundaries. Constantly evaluate whether you are working the right amount of hours for your major, class schedule, and extracurricular involvement.

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By Marisa Bianco

Marisa graduated from NYU in May 2020, summa cum laude, with degrees in International Relations and Spanish. She grew up in Nebraska, but she is currently living in Córdoba, Spain, where she works as an English teacher. You can find her eating tapas in the Spanish sun while likely stressing about finding her life’s purpose.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Staying Confident

Tuesday, October 6th, 2020

So, I graduated from college during a pandemic. The last two months of school were one of the hardest and shocking obstacles I had to overcome during my entire college career. I was devastated by learning that I wouldn’t get to experience any senior events. I was devastated that I wouldn’t get to see my best friends for G-d knows how long. On top of all of these realizations, I now had to get used to virtual learning for my last two months of school. Not only did this completely change my capstone course, but I also felt like I couldn’t find the motivation to learn more. Once my classes switched to online I felt as though college was already over. I was so upset and bothered by all of the unknowns that I found it extremely hard to stay focused on my courses. 

It was hard not having anywhere to go to do my work. It was hard not having in-person classes. It was hard learning online when professors didn’t even know how to teach their courses online. I always found getting up and having a place to go would motivate me more to do my work. So once we became virtual, I struggled to get my work done. This was a whole new way of learning for me.

You see, for my capstone class, I was supposed to be a part of a class documentary. One that we produced, wrote and edited ourselves. But once we switched to online, the documentary was no longer an option. I missed out on learning the ins and outs of documentary reporting. Although the class transitioned into writing, editing, and producing a podcast, I still felt like I lost out on a huge opportunity. 

Over time, I learned to accept that this was the end of my college career and there was nothing I could do to change that. Once I accepted that I made the best out of it. In any obstacle that is thrown your way during college, the most important thing to realize is that things happen and you have to just keep moving forward. I finished my courses with all A’s and graduated from college during a pandemic. The most unforgettable year. The hardest year. But it has also been a year of self-reflection and improvement. 

I am now on the job hunt. I can tell you one thing that I know for sure. Job searching during a pandemic is not easy. I have come across many emails saying, “Thank you for your interest but we are not hiring at the moment.” As the months go on though, jobs have opened up and the search has definitely picked up. The most important a person can do for themselves while searching for a job or internship is to network. Networking has always been important but it is one of the most important aspects of finding a job right now. If you can build your network and get your name to the recruiters before you apply then you are more than likely to set yourself up to succeed. I don’t want to give too much advice on the interviewing process because I have just begun interviewing, but I will tell you that you must stay confident during these times. There have been moments where I have gotten a bit discouraged, but I reminded myself that there are so many people struggling to find jobs right now and that it is not just me. If you realize that you have so much to offer and don’t give up, eventually the right position will come along and you will be happy that you worked this hard. Stay confident. Stay confident. Stay confident. 


By Hannah Sternberg

Hannah is a graduate from James Madison University where she majored in the School of Media Arts and Design with a concentration of Broadcast Journalism. She worked for her school’s weekly newscast called Breeze TV as a reporter. Her dream is to become a reporter but she also enjoys the entertainment production industry. One of her favorite things to do to relieve stress is dancing. 

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourages them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Recent Grad, New Job, or So I Thought

Thursday, May 20th, 2010

When I received my undergraduate degree from Baruch College in May 2006, I was ecstatic. I immediately began applying for jobs and couldn’t wait for my phone to start ringing non-stop. Little did I know that this was a far fetched idea; my phone did ring, but not as often as I had originally hoped for, so I decided to make some phone calls myself. I contacted the human resources departments of at least three companies to inquire about the status of my applications and was told more than once that I did not have enough experience. Experience I thought, how many new graduates have experience? I believed that one industry related internship and a few years of non-industry related work experience were enough for me to get an interview, but apparently it wasn’t. At that point, I realized both the power and importance of an internship, which may have been obvious to some, but to others, such as me, it was new and enlightening information that could have helped to speed up my career.
According to freedictionary.com, an internship is defined as “a student or recent graduate undergoing supervised practical training.” This means that as a student or a recent graduate, one will gain hands on experience in their field of choice. Most internship’s are unpaid, but do compensate students by offering credit for a specified course. For example, a student may work as an intern for the duration of the fall, spring, or summer semester. When the internship is completed, the student may then receive the number of credits for the course taken in conjunction with the internship.
There are various ways in which a student can find an internship. Below is a list of resources/tips that can help students with their search.

  • Contact your school career and internship center. These centers have trained staff members who are there to assist you with your career, job, and internship needs. Most of these centers offer career guidance, resume and cover letter workshops, and interview preparation assistance.
  • Utilize the career services that are offered by the public library. New York Public Library, Queens Public Library, and Brooklyn Public Library all offer free career services. They also have many materials that may help you with your internship search.

New York Public Library Info for Job Seekers
Queens Library Job Resources
Brooklyn Public Library EJIC

-Shana H

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