Time Killers and Quick Bites Before Broadway

May 18th, 2018

If you have time to spare before house opens, go wandering–but not too far.

If you come more than 30 minutes early to the theatre, you will find a long line of ticket holders/buyers standing around. You’ll do better wandering Time Square than standing around.

Don’t bore yourself by loitering around the streets waiting for the show.

With the exception of the Lincoln Theatre, Broadway theatres are in proximity to the lights of Time Square. There’s so much to catch. Go wander.

Quick Bites:

Don’t let food tire you out, so get something small.

Places for a Quick Bite that are not McDonald’s. If you have cash money in your pockets, like a $10 bill, this could get you a treat.

  • Ice Cream
  • Hot Dog Stands
  • Halal Stands
  • The Walgreens on 42nd Street
  • Yeah, get lazy and go to McDonald’s for a burger.

 

Outdoorsy Things: Hang around the subways and listen to the songs and drummers. If you have change in your pockets, spare some.

 

On cold winters days

If the sun ain’t shining or the snow is ankle-deep, you’re better off hanging in the warmth of indoor areas. Of course, due to the tight areas of the theatres, they won’t let you in soon.

Don’t randomly enter apartment or business buildings that you have no residency or interest in using. Go walk into one of the stores, a public space where you’re brief visitation is welcomed. I have walked into the Disney store to stare at Marvel and Star Wars merch. If you have the means, plan for which T-Shirt or snowglobe or cheesy keychains you want to give to your relatives.

 

Of course: Above allelse, come about 30 minutes when house opens. The theatre will be filling up and the ticket/waiting lines moving.

Up Next: In the Theatre…

By Caroline Cao


Carol is a queer Vietnamese-Houstonian Earthling surviving under the fickle weather of New York. When she’s not seeing a Broadway production, she’s buried in her nonfiction MFA homework like Hermione Granger and her Hogwarts studies. When not angsting over her first poetry manuscript or a pilot screenplay about space samurais, Carol is cooking her own Chinese food instead of buying take-outs and dreaming of winning Hamilton lotto tickets. She chronicles the quirks of New York living and writing, runs writing and scripting services, and lends her voice to Birth Movies DeathThe Mary SueFilm School Rejectsand The Script Lab. She’s also lurking in the shadows waiting for you to follow her on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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My High School Sewing Class Still Helps Me Make Life Decisions Today

April 16th, 2018

To me, high school is a time where it’s very difficult to feel like your own person. While some people combat this by going through an “emo-phase” or dyeing their hair blonde, I decided to sign up for an adult education sewing class. I had always been interested in sewing at least from a curiosity perspective. At the time I was very into “fashion,” and thought my ultimate goal should be to make my own clothing, so the first step was to learn the basics of a sewing machine. I was 15 and by no means an adult, so my mom called the class teacher to check if I would even be allowed to join. After that confirmation I was in, and the youngest member of the class by about 30 years.

Image Credit: http://www.wirama.com/want-to-learn-sewing/

The first project was a drawstring bag. We sewed the string strip and the square bag with a small tunnel opening. I was amazed at how taking things step by step it was so simple, but the end product was something functional, useful, and I made it entirely myself.

Throughout the program I really enjoyed my time spent with these women, and the projects we were able to create. If my bobbin got stuck, or my thread fell out of my needle, they would help me fix it right away without ever being condescending toward the fact that I was young to be there. This class really made me feel for the first time like I was doing something concrete to achieve a goal I set out for myself, and that was exciting, refreshing, and motivating. During a time where I found it hard to separate myself from my friends, and really find out what makes me an individual, this class was a twice-weekly escape into my own world.

I keep mentioning how this was a big deal for me because it was during high school, but really I often think back to this time when making decisions in my life since then. At any age I think it can be easy to fall into a rut, or fall into into the habits of the group of people around you. But when I think back to this class I not only think it was a great decision for my individuality, I also think it showed me how the most memorable parts of your life, and perhaps the most meaningful, come from when you decide to do something just for yourself, because you know you will enjoy and benefit from it. This is where I try to base most of my career-oriented decisions from, and so far it has led me in a rewarding direction.

Ultimately, what I learned from this was how great it was to do my own thing, step out of my comfort zone, and make a decisive move for myself. It made me realize that until you sit down with yourself and think about what you want to do and what would be best for you, nothing in your life will ever really change. If you’re struggling right now to figure out what you want to do in life, or if you feel stuck in a rut, try to think of what opportunities around you excite you. If you realize you’ve been working as a graphic designer but you really miss doing the science experiments from your high school biology class, then follow that idea and volunteer as a research assistant. You’re only ever going to get something good out of doing something just for yourself, and it might just lead you somewhere you weren’t expecting.

By Danielle Agugliaro


Danielle is a junior magazine journalism student at Syracuse University hoping to one day connect beauty, fashion, and environmental science journalism in an engaging way for the public. When she’s not busy working on assignments she likes to relax with a Kurt Vonnegut novel, smoothie bowl, and her pet bird, Alfie.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Out of the Library and into the Fire: A College Student’s Arrival into Bedlam

April 11th, 2018

I can attest to the struggle of finding one’s footing upon entering the anxiety-filled halls of freshman year. I remember very clearly being incredibly excited to set out upon an adventure that I had imagined thousands of times through in my mind. However, that didn’t mean that I wouldn’t encounter trials and tribulations that I would learn from. This era was the time in my life when I began to see the most physical change my body had ever undergone. In many ways, were my choices both good and bad, healthy and unhealthy, mature and immature, etc. Sophomore year of college made me aware of how important it is to spend one’s time wisely, in taking action that will propel your entire life in a positive direction, because the time so quickly escapes you.

(Photo Credit: http://www.free-management-ebooks.com/news/bains-rapid-framework/)

So what does it mean to wisely spend one’s time as a new college student, fresh blood upon the quads and campuses of universities that are dominated by more intelligent, more attractive, less awkward individuals, and push one’s life in a “healthy direction”? Well, having experienced my sophomore year living in a dorm over one hundred years old with one roommate and six other suite mates…and two bathrooms, I can attest that there is a necessity to be ever aware of three important aspects of one’s life: hygiene/healthy eating, time management, and prioritization of long-term goals. If these things are kept in mind, then it is much less likely that someone will arrive into a bedlam of their own. There will be difficult times, but one has to remember to always be maintaining your happiness and the sources of that for you. For me, being “happy”, or in a good mood, was always very influenced by the things I had recently eaten. And, if you are or ever have been a college student, you will understand that diet, what you are eating everyday, is one of, if not the, greatest influences on your overall well being and must be well maintained.

Saving money, snatching the best promos, having fun, or discovering one’s passions is always going to be on the mind of new college students. However, I found that this focus tends to detriment the decisions made about dieting, hygiene, and the general effort that is

directed toward one’s academics. Let me assure you, if not enough value is endowed to hygiene/health, time management, and prioritization of long-term goals, than a path to bedlam will surely be paved.

(Photo Credit: https://chefman.com/healthy-living/)

In terms of being healthy, of feeling energized, of feeling ready for obstacles,, and to face life with a level headed mind the upkeep of the mind and body holds the greatest import. The vegetables, fruits, balanced meals, non-sodas are much healthier options than the typical fast food that college students flock to,  and I know first hand that what I am saying is a difficult thing to put into practice.

(Photo Credit: https://www.istockphoto.com/vector/healthy-food-vector-diet-for-life-nutrition-modern-balanced-diet-isolated-flat-gm875565078-244425912)

Sometimes, at 3:00 AM, a cheeseburger, or some greasy tacos, or a breakfast burrito just sounds like an absolute necessity, but the will can remain steadfast! I have seen snacking, sodas, excess alcohol, drugs, and fast food deal irreversible damage on college students who showed promising potential. When there is academic material to be appreciated and learned from, or when there is an exam looming that requires heavy preparation, whatever the task may be, it is always disadvantageous to perform those tasks while not at one’s full capacity in both mind and body.

I understand the desire to live out the college life depicted across pop-culture. However, the University and the system of higher education exists first and foremost to satiate the desire to learn. To progress the intellectual and deliberative processes of the human mind, and propel an individual, who has sought such training, positively forward in their life. The Bedlam that I once knew came upon me quickly and without remorse, because I turned a blind eye to this understanding and allowed my momentary happiness to overshadow my long-term life goals. I write, now removed from my Bedlam of Sophomore year of college, with greatest hope that these words can better prepare new college entries to pave a path away from Bedlam and toward jubilant amelioration.

By James Rodriguez


James Rodriguez is a recent college graduate from New York University, who, after experiencing a diverse range of trials and tribulations in undergrad, is seeking to share his lessons learned with those who can capitalize on them today. Originally from San Antonio, Texas, he found living in New York City drastically different from what he was accustomed to. From this time of transformation, readjustment and reevaluation James now seeks to utilize the lessons and understandings that he gained to better the experiences of those who face similar experiences. Working in tandem with the Campus Clipper, James now has the platform to share his words and experiences with greatest hopes that the difficulties he faced will be ameliorated for others.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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The Diary of a College Student: Adjusting to Life Off-Stage and into the Lecture Hall

April 2nd, 2018

In having been an actor for over 10 years of my life the adjustment that I experienced in not pursuing acting further in college was interesting, to say the least. Before that, life had been a world of opportunity in the sense that anywhere could have been a stage upon which to demonstrate my craft, my commitment, my skill, etc..

Upon arriving in New York City as a freshman college student, I found myself searching for something new around which to center my life. Something that could fill the void I felt inside me. I wanted to substitute something for the hours of intense training, detail-oriented rehearsals, and a creativity that was conditioned to image the sufferings and joys of human existence. I was in the process of reimagining my life, adjusting to my new life off-stage, in lecture halls, and among unfamiliar peers; in the manner that I would live, the activities that I would pursue daily, the motivation that I felt that pushed me toward always becoming better than what I was the day before, etc.. I believe that this time, a time of life re-imagined, can relate to, and is shared by, those who experience a dramatic shift in their day-to-day routines, their sense of limitation, and their sense of liberty when choosing what to prioritize in life.

This especially applies to college students, namely Freshmen, who recently removed themselves from a familiar environment full of routine and safety. In attending an out-of-town, an out-of-state, or international university, students are faced with the difficult task of taking what they knew as life and drastically reimaging it to suit their needs in their new localities. The difficulties arises from temptation. Temptation that is reinforced by the general newfound liberty of independent living. Spiderman taught me at a young age that “with great power comes great responsibility,” and it is a fact of human existence that ameliorating one’s liberty of choice, freedom of expression, and right to self-determination is directly relatable to one’s sense power.

So in here lies the subject of responsibility. What this essay aims to make palpable is the difficulty that exists in maintaining one’s sense of responsibility and pragmatism during this time of life re-imagined. Before, we discussed the opportunities college students have in trying to find the best student deals, spark new relationships, curate better hygiene, etc. when in an unfamiliar place, such as attending a new school. However, it is this greater realization of the individual’s power of choice that is the true subject of this discourse. I don’t want to sound cliché, but for new college students, there is no greater excitement then determining exactly what it is that makes you happy and using those sources of happiness to your advantage.

Image Credit: http://www.scei.edu.au/news

The overwhelming nature of arriving in a different city, into a situation where there are no longer limits on the things you can try, or finding where those things will begin generally brings anxiety with it. It is good to feel that anxiety, because it means that you value what your life is and your happiness in living it. If I could go back and tell myself a tidbit of advice freshman year, I would tell him this: there is no greater opportunity missed than living a life that prioritizes your health, your happiness, and your ability to make patient deliberated decisions. That may seem like an Olympian sized feat, but it begins with the littlest of things. For example, when one prioritizes their health and ability to focus and deliberate, than drinking the night before a test perhaps wouldn’t even enter one’s mind as a viable option.

Image Credit: https://www.pragmait.com/therapyboss/blog/short-term-or-long-term-goals-still-required/

It may seem a little extreme. However, when I was adjusting to my life off-stage there were many decisions that I see now as being nothing but a hindrance on my overall goal of being happy. I was more concerned with my momentary happiness and less concerned with prioritizing my long term goals.  It is easy to try and find the most exciting thing to do as a young new college freshman or sophomore, but it is all too easy to get caught up in the overwhelming liberty that comes with newfound independence. Always prioritize the life you want to be living and don’t simply live in the moment, and I promise that your life re-imagined will be a rewarding one to live.

By James Rodriguez


A Texan born and raised, James Rodriguez grew up in San Antonio TX, and has recently graduated from New York University, having studied corporate and political publicity. He sings, plays guitar, studies French, etc. in his free time, and when given the opportunity to share advice that he thought noteworthy with future or current college students, he jumped on the chance. He believes that there is something incredibly important in obtaining knowledge from those who are going through or have recently finished dealing with the difficulties one is seeking advice on. Which is exactly the aim of the Campus Clipper: to share the best advice possible in order to better the experiences of students who are struggling now. Because he was once that lost college student who was searching for instruction and who felt out-of-place and in need of direction, he hopes that his words can relate to someone’s struggle and help along the way. 

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

 

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Broadway Discounts Are a Millennial Student’s Best Friend Series Part 3: Rushes, Deals and Lotteries, oh my!

February 13th, 2018

It’s not just about having sharp eyes for deals. It’s all about luck and timing to increase the odds.

Sometimes TDF or TKTS doesn’t do for you. Luck be a lady tonight, let us talk about other deals, rushes, and lotteries.

Mark your calendars and alerts for:

NYC Broadway Week Deal

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Around early September and February, it’s the semi-annual Broadway Week! This means theatre producers are releasing two-for-one ticket deals for a time frame. Snagging an extra ticket is a magnificent bargain gift for your Broadway buddy–or relatives to introduce theatre too.

If you’re on a stricter budget, split the cost of the one-ticket price between your Broadway buddy and enjoy your two tickets together. If you’re paying the whole price out of your own credit card, have your friend reimburse you through Venmo. (Make sure they’re trustworthy.)

Broadway Week happens twice a year, so exploit it when it comes around. Tickets sell out fast.

Rush Tickets

Profit is a full house. When there are empty seats, theaters scramble to get them sold and filled.

The TKTS booth is a popular place to hunt for rush tickets, but some theaters sell rush directly from their own box office. Go to a production’s personalized websites and see when $30 rush tickets are available. Rush tickets often are available 2 hours before showing, but some buyers are lucky to just walk up to a window 10 minutes before curtain and obtain a rush.

Sometimes rush is offered at the crack of dawn right when box office opens. I made the mistake of chancing that A Band’s Visit might offer rush only two hours before a showing. But once I reached the booth, I was told there was none and rush were actually sold in the morning.

The free TodayTix app can inform you of available rush tickets through notifications. Rush for Hello Dolly can amount to $39 seats.

A referral code of TodayTix

A referral code of TodayTix

Bonus Hack: You’ll get a referral code when you sign up on Today Tix. Post your referral code on your Twitter and Facebook. Find a Broadway buddy who is also on TodayTix and use their referral code to get $10 credit when purchasing, and tell them to use your referral code for credit.

 

In-Person Lotteries

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Many years ago, I lingered in a crowd of fans at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre to enter my name into the then hottest-Broadway Best Musical Tony Award-winning Book of Mormon lottery for discounted seats, with up to two tickets for each entry. Alas, Heaven did not smile upon me and my name wasn’t drawn.

Some high-demand productions conduct an in-person raffle at their theatre doors, usually in the range of $30-40. While this is becoming a thing of the past (thanks, digital age), some theaters still operate in-person lotteries. As of 2018, Book of Mormon still conducts in-person lotteries (now $37 tickets) while also supplementing it with digital.

Digital may save us the inconvenience of going outside. But the wonderful thing about in-person lotteries is the atmosphere of community and the suspense of hearing your name called out. You can insert one entry for up to two tickets. To increase the odds, bring your Broadway buddy so they can slip in a 2-ticket entry.

Warning: DO NOT enter your name twice in the raffle. Not just because you will get caught because they do double-check for double-entry. That’s cheating and not fair to the other participants. The theatre will ensure that you slipped in only one entry form. Sometimes a well-intended friend or family member might throw in another entry card for you, but make sure they don’t. There is a horror story of a disappointed girl when her friend threw her name twice into the raffle without her consent, disqualifying her from claiming tickets.

Digital Lotteries

Ah, technology, enabling us to do tasks from the sinking comfort of the sofa or bed. If you’re not a fan of snow slipping into your boots or the sun beating down on you, digital is your thing.

The miracle with a production like Book of Mormon is that it holds its own digital lottery and in-person raffles, and you can enter both to bolster your odds.

Each production can hold their own digital lotteries, including Phantom of the OperaSchool of RockAnastasia.

Broadway Direct Lotteries online hold lotteries for $30-$40 seatings. A friend testified that he won a total of six times: from Willy Wonka (which is closed), to Wicked, to Lion King.

Ham4Ham Lottery: The Hamilton app has a lottery for  the coveted $10 tickets, ironically the cheapest lottery tickets around for a notoriously high-demand production. Also, it has a notification system.

Not all lotteries can offer smartphone notifications like the Hamilton app. It’s up to you to check each production for the lottery opening times. Set alerts on your smartphone to remind you to submit your entries. So when you lug yourself out of bed, you’re getting your shot and you ain’t throwing it away. A win can just be a few finger taps away.

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Someday, I’ll be in the room where it happens.

Playbill has more info on where to find rushes and lotteries for each currently-running production.

By Caroline Cao


Carol is a queer Vietnamese-Houstonian Earthling surviving under the fickle weather of New York. When she’s not seeing a Broadway production, she’s buried in her nonfiction MFA homework like Hermione Granger and her Hogwarts studies. When not angsting over her first poetry manuscript or a pilot screenplay about space samurais, Carol is cooking her own Chinese food instead of buying take-outs and dreaming of winning Hamilton lotto tickets. She chronicles the quirks of New York living and writing, runs writing and scripting services, and lends her voice to Birth Movies DeathThe Mary SueFilm School Rejectsand The Script Lab. She’s also lurking in the shadows waiting for you to follow her on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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So I Guess I Went North for the Winter

February 12th, 2018

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So despite the fact that a textbook I read for a history class compared the “nationalism” of California to that of a community with nation status, no one I know from home stayed in California for college. I come from Oakland CA, the Bay Area, a fifteen-minute BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) ride from downtown San Francisco. Everyone I know who lives in that area, including my mother, who is from New York, and my friend, who is from China, loves the Bay Area with their whole soul, which makes it confusing why we would choose to leave. My personal theory is that all of us know we’re coming back. When people go to college, they might want to see how they like it and then decide where to live, but everyone I know is going to live in the Bay Area. They might visit other places or work in other places, but they will live in the Bay. Because the Bay is home.

So we all left. In preparation for this, my school librarian hosted a “how to dress for the winter” informational session during lunchtime after college acceptances had come out. It was widely attended. Said librarian, who is from Boulder, Colorado, instructed us in the use of hats, scarves, and gloves, items that I basically knew existed, but had never voluntarily owned. I’m still adjusting to the city, asking my roommate from Connecticut whether this is scarf weather. And today, fed up with the idea of “socks,” I elected to walk to the dining hall in flip flops. My feet got wet and cold and I slipped a few times, but I made it. The Californian has survived.

Besides the weather, there are other adjustments to make when coming from the West Coast to the East Coast. The East Coast is old blood, colonial revolutionary blood. That means the East has traditions. Standards. The West has none of that. I have friends whose family came over in the gold rush. They were opportunists looking for a “get rich quick” scheme.

If there’s one way I can sum up the Bay Area’s culture it’s this: the Bay hates formality. Anything you can do to take it away is good. Calling your teachers by surnames seems a little much, let’s go with first names, or even nicknames. Not being able to swear in class? Let’s get rid of that one too. We didn’t graduate in a cap and gown. We could wear whatever we want and some of the kids wore caps, some wore gowns, some wore both and some wore neither. We looked about as coordinated as a jamboree class. As a high school student, I spend some time on the Berkeley campus. Everyone on the Berkeley campus is wearing sweatpants, sweatshirts and flip flops. And because the temperature never gets below 50 or above 80, they look like this year round. This all conspired to mean that when I walked into my 8 am first year math lecture to see people in heels and makeup, I was confused. I looked down at my own legging-clad legs, shrugged, and went to sit down. My personal overture towards both coasts is the “leggings and heels” look, which gets across comfort without sacrificing too much dignity, though it’s very uncomfortable if you’re late to class.

My first impression of New York was that it’s a city of people going places on their way to other places. People in California are busy too, but they stand still for a second, sit down for a meal. New Yorkers are going to meetings on the way to their other meetings.

By Abigail McManus


Abigail McManus, a first year linguistics major, is interested in all things words and stories. In her abundant free time, she writes and thinks about language, as well as practicing Jiu Jistu and Karate. She is from the San Francisco Bay Area and she’ll tell you about it if you let her. 

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Eva’s Kitchen—Restaurant Review

January 30th, 2018

Last Friday, I visited Eva’s Kitchen on W 8th St. for a bite to eat. They kindly invited me for a meal and a chat, and I was delighted to accept. Upon arrival, enthusiastic and welcoming Alex came around the counter and took my order, chitchatting with me about the menu while I deliberated over the options. Salads, wraps/burritos, “power plates,” smoothies—choices galore! A whole section dedicated to vegetarian options too! It is clear just looking at the menu and its featured ingredients that this is a restaurant dedicated to serving and pleasing a wide array of health-conscious, hungry individuals. Brown rice, egg whites, sweet potatoes—whole grains and lean sources of protein…What could be better?

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Alex told me that his particular favorite is The Mighty Jeff Ross: grilled chicken and brown rice topped with chili beans, low fat mozzarella, and guacamole—apparently one of their best-sellers (and, by the description, I can understand why—simplistic, hearty, and delicious).

I took his input into consideration and went with the South American Burrito (which is pretty similar to The Mighty Jeff Ross with some tweaks here and there)—a whole wheat wrap stuffed with homemade guacamole, romaine, cucumber, tomato, brown rice, grilled chicken, and chili beans. I grinned satisfactorily at my choice as I placed my order and made my way over to a table to (hungrily and eagerly) wait in anticipation.

Eva’s is clearly a hotspot in Greenwich Village. The restaurant’s aura is relaxed and casual in the best way—that is, the opposite of too many NYC cafés that are so trendily hoity-toity that just walking in the doors can induce a crushing self-conscious feeling. Eva’s, on the other hand, is wonderfully warm and inviting.

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Perhaps this is due to the history and authenticity residing within its walls. This February, Eva’s is celebrating its 40th year anniversary—that is, this landmark joint “serving delicious and nutritious food” (with a Mediterranean flair, it seems) has been around since the Spring of 1978. That’s over twice my age…Pretty cool!

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As I waited, Steve (the store manager) wandered over and began chatting with me. I was struck by his kindness and spirited pride in all that is Eva’s. His kindness was contagious as we sat and talked. He told me about his personal favorite on the menu—The Eggs & Tomato: a whole wheat wrap with 5 egg whites, tomato, and cheddar cheese. I’ll have to try it next time.

He explained that the motto of Eva’s Kitchen is: “Eat good, feel good.” Their trademark is healthy food that tastes good and makes you feel good. He even mentioned that they cook with no preservatives. I was thrilled to hear that—it’s hard to find places in the city nowadays that actually care about quality of ingredients and how their food makes their customers feel upon leaving.

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My burrito came very quickly; I was very impressed by the quick service. Steve left me to enjoy my meal—although without first talking up and bringing me their house-made hot sauce (which, he mentioned, is somehow free of salt altogether!). I’m a spicy food lover, so I was very excited to try it—and very pleased with its tangy, flavorful, and subtly smoky flavor. And, of course, it did bring the heat.

The burrito itself was to die for. I wouldn’t typically think to put cucumbers in a burrito, but what a wonderful addition—it adds a pleasant crunch and acts as a nice spice-tamer. When I first saw the size of the burrito, the following thought-process occurred: “There’s no way I’ll be able to eat all that it one sitting. That’s okay though—it’ll make for a great lunch tomorrow.”

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To my surprise, I ate the entire thing—I left absolutely no trace…What can I say, it was really delicious. The chicken was juicy; the guac was flavorful (without being overly salty or, on the other hand, bland); the rice was tender; the veggies were fresh and crisp; and, overall, it left me feeling full, satisfied, and with a smile on my face. I didn’t feel bogged down and greasy like I typically do after eating a burrito. Like Steve told me: “Eat good, feel good!”

Overall, I had a blast visiting Eva’s. Particularly notable was their very fast service; lively and personable staff; extensive menu with something for everyone and anyone (no matter what preferences or dietary restrictions one might have); the constant ebb and flow of colorful customers (it clearly is a hotspot!); and the warm aura altogether.

I left with a full belly, a smiling face, and a piece of carrot cake to-go (thanks again, Steve!). Wholesome seems like a very fitting word to describe both Eva’s ambiance and tasty (yet still healthy!) food. The authenticity defining the years of memories made within, the food served, the friendly staff, and the hungry visitors (be them regulars or newcomers) seems to be what makes Eva’s uniquely…Eva’s. And due to such authenticity, Eva’s undoubtedly stands out as an NYC gem. I cannot wait for my next visit. As an NYU student with this place right around the corner from campus…Watch out Eva’s, I think I just found my new favorite lunch spot!

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*If you’re an NYU Student, make sure to stop by Eva’s and get 10% off The Lazy Hustler (“The #1 Falafel Burrito in NYC”) when you show your student ID!

**More information (and coupons) can be found at: http://www.campusclipper.com/new/coupons.php?REG_COD=1

By Libby King

 


Libby is an NYU student, a Campus Clipper foodie, and a passionate writer and graphic designer. She writes her own blog, libalittle.com, where she strives to share insight, encourage creativity, and stimulate curiosity.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Broadway Discounts Are a Millennial Student’s Best Friend Series Part 2: TKTS Booth at Times Square

January 29th, 2018

IMG_4076

If you have the will to lug yourself out of bed and put on some pants, consider hunting for Broadway deals in the outdoor glittering lights of Times Square. Convince yourself to snap your laptop shut.

In Part 1, I discussed purchasing tickets over TDF online as an introvert. Although I prefer the indoor joys of ordering discount tickets on TDF online, online does not have everything available. I have my eyes peeled for affordable deals on Come From Away and Dear Evan Hansen, but I rarely see them online. If you’re not a fan of paying the TDF membership fee, take a trip to the TKTS booths for same-day discounts.

For simplicity sake, this blog will focus on the main Times Square booth. There are also three other booths at the South Street Seaport, Lincoln Center, and Downtown Brooklyn. But Times Square booth yields the most variety of features.

Pass the costumed Marvel heroes and Disney icons beckoning tourists for photos, the Times Square TKTS booth is located underneath the Glowing Ruby-Red Stairs at 47th Street. It’s easily accessible through the red-1 train line on the 50th street stop.

red stairs

Photo provided by the Theatre Development Fund

Compared to TDF membership purchases, where seating arrangement is a wild card once you pick up your ticket at the box office, TKTS allows you to gauge your seating arrangement at the booth.

Set a free day to go bargain hunting, preferably on a Friday or weekends. In case you don’t find the bargain you want, set up a backup plan, like eating out or seeing a movie or just walking around Times Square.

Set a budget: How much are you willing to spend? Is there a show that’s difficult to access that you’re willing to pay a 20% discount for? (Sorry, no Hamilton but Phantom of the Opera can pop up) Personally, I would aim for 50% deals. But some deals are only 20-30%. I remember getting a $100 offer for the high-demand Once On This Island revival and turning it down.

The Times Square booth hours. 

For Evening Performances:

Monday – Saturday: 3:00pm – 8:00pm

(Tuesday starts at 2:00pm)

Sunday: 3:00pm – 7:00pm

 

For Matinee Performances:

Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday: 10:00am – 2:00pm

Sunday: 11:00am – 3:00pm

 

Downloading the free TKTS app allows you to track shows available at the booth. I wish I could purchase discounts from the app, but that’s not how it works. It will alert you of the show availability, but if you see something you want, it’s up to you to physically purchase it at the booth. So run!

 

The TKTS app

The TKTS app

 

Come early.

Come an hour early because you can expect the line to be already occupied with New Yorkers or tourists with their eyes peeled for discounts.

But if there’s nothing to pique your interests…

Come later.

While I prefer going early to catch the expansive deals, Thoughtco offers this hack: Arrive in line closer to the show time when unsold house seats are released. Lines are said to be shorter and surprises may pop up. So if you came early and find nothing remarkable, take a walk around Times Square and then return perhaps about 30 minutes before the standard show time of 8:00 pm (2:00/3:00 pm on matinee). If you get a desired deal, make a dash to the appropriate theatre that’s playing your show (so have your Google Map ready to ascertain theatre address).

The Times Square booth also has this perk: The TKTS 7-Day Fast Pass. Within 7 days of your TKTS purchase, show your ticket stub, and stroll right up to Window #1, thereby skipping the lines.

For non-musical play viewers: Window #12 is the “Play Only” window. Plays are sold at all windows, but you can go directly to that window for a much shorter wait if you’re not into musicals. (I’ll personally recommend the long-running Play That Goes Wrong.)

To summarize:

Pros: Getting sun, shot at options that aren’t available online, the sense of community being around theatre-goers, getting a FastPass with a ticket stub.

Cons: Long lines, freezing in cold winters, boiling in the hot sun, the anxiety of not getting your desired deal, deals in constant flux.

One last caution: Avoid the scalpers wandering at the line, who will tempt you with fake bargains.

Happy bargain hunting in the sun or snow, preferably the former.

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Sources:


Carol is a queer Vietnamese-Houstonian Earthling surviving under the fickle weather of New York. When she’s not seeing a Broadway production, she’s buried in her nonfiction MFA homework like Hermione Granger and her Hogwarts studies. When not angsting over her first poetry manuscript or a pilot screenplay about space samurais, Carol is cooking her own Chinese food instead of buying take-outs and dreaming of winning Hamilton lotto tickets. She chronicles the quirks of New York living and writing, runs writing and scripting services, and lends her voice to Birth Movies DeathThe Mary SueFilm School Rejectsand The Script Lab. She’s also lurking in the shadows waiting for you to follow her on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Broadway Discounts Are a Millennial Student’s Best Friend Series Part 1: Theatre Development Fund

January 19th, 2018

broadway lights-2

Broadway doesn’t come cheap. If I were a millionaire, my first impulse would be to snag every full-price Broadway ticket.

In the Broadway musical adaptation of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, the showstopper “Great Big Stuff” hurls out this laughter-inducing quip: “I can finally afford to see a Broadway show!”

When I was living in Houston, Texas, I dreamed of faraway land of fantasies and wonder of Hamilton and the Comet of 1812. But they’re too pricey to fly from city just to catch a show. Because current productions aren’t available on DVD or Netflix, they aren’t easy to access.

Now having moved to New York City, I confronted plenty of tricks and trades of bargains. It’s not perfect: There are shows too far out of the reach (Curse you, sold out and overpriced Hamilton tickets!) but a student status and familiarity of deals can assuage your thrifty habits.

In 2014, LA Weekly cited that an average Broadway ticket costs a daunting $100, but truth is, ticket prices are often in flux. That does not account for high-demand productions like Hamilton, Hello Dolly, or Once Upon an Island. As a graduate student, I don’t have my wallet full enough to buy $100 tickets on a whim.

First, ask yourself how much you are willing to spend per month on tickets.

My personal goal: 2-3 shows a month. I aim for about $50 or below for each ticket. I’ll have money left for groceries.

Theatre Development Fund Membership

If you’re a student or recent graduate, you are eligible for membership with the Theatre Development Fund (the TDF).

Prices for Broadway productions are often fixed. As of my 2017-2018 membership, I encountered these prices:

For musicals: $51

For plays: $45-46

Yearly membership fee is $35, which is a fair trade off to access $51 tickets, about 50% of the average ticket price.

(Psssss, I Googled the promo code MetroNY on Retail Me Not, which knocked my first-year membership fee down to $29. If this code had expired by the time you read this, Google around to hunt for an additional code.)

I give fair warning: TDF seat selection is a wild card. Before a purchase, it will warn you whether seating is in mezzanine or balcony, but you will not be informed of the exact seating arrangement once you order your ticket. I can credit it for not shoving me at the far rear or the balcony. Once in a while, I got sweet deal of center orchestra seating for School of Rock or center mezzanine for the Cats revival for a grander scope.

Cats

My scope of the mezzanine view of the Cats revival, courtesy of TDF.

Every so often, I was planted at the far side of mezzanine, but a decently close to the front. At one point for Anastasia, TDF put me on the front-row orchestra. Sounds wonderful but there was this catch: It was the orchestra-left side farthest from the center, an angled neck-straining viewing experience.

I find that TDF discount has more variety of Broadway productions than other sites that offers discounts for $51. Average traditional student discounts of $51 often regulates you to the third-floor balcony seating, which I find to be far enough to deem “riiiiiiip-off.” But TDF’s $51 musical tickets have situated me in orchestra or the second-floor mezzanine and never placed me on the 3rd floor balcony. If you are chancing on a balcony seat, the purchase will warn you beforehand. Long-running and high-demand shows like Phantom of the Opera or Hello Dolly will appear, but don’t expect Wicked, The Lion King, or Hamilton to magically pop up one day (I’m keeping my eyes peeled for those).

Ordering through TDF online is ideal for a shut-in introvert like me. I don’t have to rush to a physical location or wait in line for the suspense of obtaining bargains. I never expect the TDF price to radically hike up. Few times, they have sales for tomorrow’s performances. It’s also great for long-term planning. Depending on the available line-up of show dates, TDF allows me to plan ahead with show-dates. I got my Spongebob Squarepants ticket a few weeks before I saw that nautical delight.

Be prepare to email a photo of your student ID or enrollment form as proof of eligibility at POE@tdf.org within 10 days of starting membership.

Up next: TKTS Booths and other discount methods

Sources:

– https://www.tdf.org/

By Caroline Cao


Carol is a queer Vietnamese-Houstonian Earthling surviving under the fickle weather of New York. When she’s not seeing a Broadway production, she’s buried in her nonfiction MFA homework like Hermione Granger and her Hogwarts studies. When not angsting over her first poetry manuscript or a pilot screenplay about space samurais, Carol is cooking her own Chinese food instead of buying take-outs and dreaming of winning Hamilton lotto tickets. She chronicles the quirks of New York living and writing, runs writing and scripting services, and lends her voice to Birth Movies Death, The Mary SueFilm School Rejectsand The Script Lab. She’s also lurking in the shadows waiting for you to follow her on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

Share

On Budgeting, Or Money Does Not Grow on Trees

December 28th, 2017
Image Credit:  http://blog.bqe.com/2010/08/08/15-ways-to-use-a-budget/

Image Credit:
http://blog.bqe.com/2010/08/08/15-ways-to-use-a-budget/

Studying in college, you probably often find yourself hunting for various student discounts, special offers and college student deals in order to save money. If your education is not free, it does not take long to end up with a huge student loan, which will burden you upon graduation. I don’t need to tell you how expensive textbooks are nowadays; you buy them every semester, and they do break the bank. If you are not living at home, you need to pay rent and buy groceries, which makes you miss mom’s cooking along with dad’s wallet. Perhaps, this is the first time you are living on your own, and you are overwhelmed.

Don’t be. Instead, learn how to budget. It is a skill that, I promise, will improve your overall life quality – during and after college. Not only will budgeting help you avoid getting into debt, it will also fill you with self-confidence, as you will know for sure how you will pay your bills and will not have to worry about tomorrow, or the day after tomorrow and so on.

1. Determine your monthly income.

How much money, on average, do you have to spend in a month? Take a blank sheet of paper and write down how much you get paid for working, as a stipend or as an allowance from your parents. Since budgeting means creating a long-term plan, do not include any inheritance money or any amount that you do not receive on a regular basis (for example, lottery winnings, birthday gift money, and so on).

If you do not have a stable income – for instance, if you work on commission – I would suggest taking an average amount you make in a month. If in January you make less than that amount, you will have to make up the difference in February or March, but if you make more than that amount in April, put the money aside for when the business is not doing as well. The same rule applies to any sort of irregular income, such as grants, lottery winnings, etc.

2. Calculate your monthly expenses.

This includes rent, utility bills, any school-related expenses (tuition, books, etc.), transportation, health insurance, Internet and cell phone service, and so on. If you pay your tuition once a semester, divide the full amount by the number of months in a semester, or calculate the total for the whole year and divide that by 12. Also, include an average amount you spend per month on food, laundry and other necessary expenses. This is also a good time to think about how you can save money on your expenses. Check newspapers and magazines to see if you can find student coupons or promo codes or move into a cheaper apartment. Ask around. If your classmate uses less expensive cell phone service, look into it. If you learn to be frugal, living on a modest student budget, you will gain a skill that will come handy when you have to save money to buy a house, a car or a yacht – whatever your heart will desire and your wallet can afford.

Image Credit: http://www.hindustantimes.com/union-budget/budget-2017-what-arun-jaitley-can-do-to-make-the-indian-middle-class-smile/story-Dnn3ZzI5rNLNZIY2HMUYfP.html

Image Credit:
http://www.hindustantimes.com/union-budget/budget-2017-what-arun-jaitley-can-do-to-make-the-indian-middle-class-smile/story-Dnn3ZzI5rNLNZIY2HMUYfP.html

3. Compare your income and your expenses.

Ideally, your income should be bigger than the amount you spend on bills, leaving you some room for unplanned expenses, such as a pretty new dress or the newest video game. Note how much money – if any – you have left after you pay all of those expenses. Although you are free to spend any excess bucks on spoiling yourself with food and entertainment, I would suggest opening a savings account and determining an amount you can deposit into it on a monthly basis without starving yourself. Later on, you can use this account for any unplanned expenses or gifts to yourself.

If, however, you spend more than you earn, you should start thinking of ways to increase your income. For example, you can get a part-time job on or off campus, ask your parents to increase your allowance (you can show them your budget and explain why an increase in necessary, and, I am sure, they will be impressed by your newly gained budgeting skills). Just like I mentioned above, you should plan to earn a little bit more than you spend and try to put some money aside for unplanned expenses in case you get sick, need new clothes or want to go out more. Applying for a new credit card would not be a good solution for this problem, as it could add on extra temptations and increase your expenses that your income will not be able to cover.

4. Recalculate your budget as needed.

It would be reasonable to re-budget every time your income and your expenses change significantly. For example, your tuition probably goes up every year, so you need to take that into consideration. Same applies to your roommate moving out, the price of groceries skyrocketing or your parents suddenly deciding you should support yourself.

When you first learn to budget, you can even recalculate your income versus your expenses every month, or even on a weekly basis. This will depend on how often you get paid. If your parents send you money once a month, you will have to plan on living off that money for the whole month.

By Ekaterina Lalo


Ekaterina Lalo is the Campus Clipper’s guest blogger. Ekaterina regularly blogged for the Campus Clipper in 2011 and participated in the making of the Campus Clipper’s NYC Student Guide. She is currently working as an Editorial Manager at Phantom Communications, but she is still passionate about writing for students. 

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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