Broadway Discounts Are a Millennial Student’s Best Friend Series Part 3: Rushes, Deals and Lotteries, oh my!

February 13th, 2018

It’s not just about having sharp eyes for deals. It’s all about luck and timing to increase the odds.

Sometimes TDF or TKTS doesn’t do for you. Luck be a lady tonight, let us talk about other deals, rushes, and lotteries.

Mark your calendars and alerts for:

NYC Broadway Week Deal

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Around early September and February, it’s the semi-annual Broadway Week! This means theatre producers are releasing two-for-one ticket deals for a time frame. Snagging an extra ticket is a magnificent bargain gift for your Broadway buddy–or relatives to introduce theatre too.

If you’re on a stricter budget, split the cost of the one-ticket price between your Broadway buddy and enjoy your two tickets together. If you’re paying the whole price out of your own credit card, have your friend reimburse you through Venmo. (Make sure they’re trustworthy.)

Broadway Week happens twice a year, so exploit it when it comes around. Tickets sell out fast.

Rush Tickets

Profit is a full house. When there are empty seats, theaters scramble to get them sold and filled.

The TKTS booth is a popular place to hunt for rush tickets, but some theaters sell rush directly from their own box office. Go to a production’s personalized websites and see when $30 rush tickets are available. Rush tickets often are available 2 hours before showing, but some buyers are lucky to just walk up to a window 10 minutes before curtain and obtain a rush.

Sometimes rush is offered at the crack of dawn right when box office opens. I made the mistake of chancing that A Band’s Visit might offer rush only two hours before a showing. But once I reached the booth, I was told there was none and rush were actually sold in the morning.

The free TodayTix app can inform you of available rush tickets through notifications. Rush for Hello Dolly can amount to $39 seats.

A referral code of TodayTix

A referral code of TodayTix

Bonus Hack: You’ll get a referral code when you sign up on Today Tix. Post your referral code on your Twitter and Facebook. Find a Broadway buddy who is also on TodayTix and use their referral code to get $10 credit when purchasing, and tell them to use your referral code for credit.

 

In-Person Lotteries

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Many years ago, I lingered in a crowd of fans at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre to enter my name into the then hottest-Broadway Best Musical Tony Award-winning Book of Mormon lottery for discounted seats, with up to two tickets for each entry. Alas, Heaven did not smile upon me and my name wasn’t drawn.

Some high-demand productions conduct an in-person raffle at their theatre doors, usually in the range of $30-40. While this is becoming a thing of the past (thanks, digital age), some theaters still operate in-person lotteries. As of 2018, Book of Mormon still conducts in-person lotteries (now $37 tickets) while also supplementing it with digital.

Digital may save us the inconvenience of going outside. But the wonderful thing about in-person lotteries is the atmosphere of community and the suspense of hearing your name called out. You can insert one entry for up to two tickets. To increase the odds, bring your Broadway buddy so they can slip in a 2-ticket entry.

Warning: DO NOT enter your name twice in the raffle. Not just because you will get caught because they do double-check for double-entry. That’s cheating and not fair to the other participants. The theatre will ensure that you slipped in only one entry form. Sometimes a well-intended friend or family member might throw in another entry card for you, but make sure they don’t. There is a horror story of a disappointed girl when her friend threw her name twice into the raffle without her consent, disqualifying her from claiming tickets.

Digital Lotteries

Ah, technology, enabling us to do tasks from the sinking comfort of the sofa or bed. If you’re not a fan of snow slipping into your boots or the sun beating down on you, digital is your thing.

The miracle with a production like Book of Mormon is that it holds its own digital lottery and in-person raffles, and you can enter both to bolster your odds.

Each production can hold their own digital lotteries, including Phantom of the OperaSchool of RockAnastasia.

Broadway Direct Lotteries online hold lotteries for $30-$40 seatings. A friend testified that he won a total of six times: from Willy Wonka (which is closed), to Wicked, to Lion King.

Ham4Ham Lottery: The Hamilton app has a lottery for  the coveted $10 tickets, ironically the cheapest lottery tickets around for a notoriously high-demand production. Also, it has a notification system.

Not all lotteries can offer smartphone notifications like the Hamilton app. It’s up to you to check each production for the lottery opening times. Set alerts on your smartphone to remind you to submit your entries. So when you lug yourself out of bed, you’re getting your shot and you ain’t throwing it away. A win can just be a few finger taps away.

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Someday, I’ll be in the room where it happens.

Playbill has more info on where to find rushes and lotteries for each currently-running production.

By Caroline Cao


Carol is a queer Vietnamese-Houstonian Earthling surviving under the fickle weather of New York. When she’s not seeing a Broadway production, she’s buried in her nonfiction MFA homework like Hermione Granger and her Hogwarts studies. When not angsting over her first poetry manuscript or a pilot screenplay about space samurais, Carol is cooking her own Chinese food instead of buying take-outs and dreaming of winning Hamilton lotto tickets. She chronicles the quirks of New York living and writing, runs writing and scripting services, and lends her voice to Birth Movies DeathThe Mary SueFilm School Rejectsand The Script Lab. She’s also lurking in the shadows waiting for you to follow her on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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So I Guess I Went North for the Winter

February 12th, 2018

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So despite the fact that a textbook I read for a history class compared the “nationalism” of California to that of a community with nation status, no one I know from home stayed in California for college. I come from Oakland CA, the Bay Area, a fifteen-minute BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) ride from downtown San Francisco. Everyone I know who lives in that area, including my mother, who is from New York, and my friend, who is from China, loves the Bay Area with their whole soul, which makes it confusing why we would choose to leave. My personal theory is that all of us know we’re coming back. When people go to college, they might want to see how they like it and then decide where to live, but everyone I know is going to live in the Bay Area. They might visit other places or work in other places, but they will live in the Bay. Because the Bay is home.

So we all left. In preparation for this, my school librarian hosted a “how to dress for the winter” informational session during lunchtime after college acceptances had come out. It was widely attended. Said librarian, who is from Boulder, Colorado, instructed us in the use of hats, scarves, and gloves, items that I basically knew existed, but had never voluntarily owned. I’m still adjusting to the city, asking my roommate from Connecticut whether this is scarf weather. And today, fed up with the idea of “socks,” I elected to walk to the dining hall in flip flops. My feet got wet and cold and I slipped a few times, but I made it. The Californian has survived.

Besides the weather, there are other adjustments to make when coming from the West Coast to the East Coast. The East Coast is old blood, colonial revolutionary blood. That means the East has traditions. Standards. The West has none of that. I have friends whose family came over in the gold rush. They were opportunists looking for a “get rich quick” scheme.

If there’s one way I can sum up the Bay Area’s culture it’s this: the Bay hates formality. Anything you can do to take it away is good. Calling your teachers by surnames seems a little much, let’s go with first names, or even nicknames. Not being able to swear in class? Let’s get rid of that one too. We didn’t graduate in a cap and gown. We could wear whatever we want and some of the kids wore caps, some wore gowns, some wore both and some wore neither. We looked about as coordinated as a jamboree class. As a high school student, I spend some time on the Berkeley campus. Everyone on the Berkeley campus is wearing sweatpants, sweatshirts and flip flops. And because the temperature never gets below 50 or above 80, they look like this year round. This all conspired to mean that when I walked into my 8 am first year math lecture to see people in heels and makeup, I was confused. I looked down at my own legging-clad legs, shrugged, and went to sit down. My personal overture towards both coasts is the “leggings and heels” look, which gets across comfort without sacrificing too much dignity, though it’s very uncomfortable if you’re late to class.

My first impression of New York was that it’s a city of people going places on their way to other places. People in California are busy too, but they stand still for a second, sit down for a meal. New Yorkers are going to meetings on the way to their other meetings.

By Abigail McManus


Abigail McManus, a first year linguistics major, is interested in all things words and stories. In her abundant free time, she writes and thinks about language, as well as practicing Jiu Jistu and Karate. She is from the San Francisco Bay Area and she’ll tell you about it if you let her. 

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Eva’s Kitchen—Restaurant Review

January 30th, 2018

Last Friday, I visited Eva’s Kitchen on W 8th St. for a bite to eat. They kindly invited me for a meal and a chat, and I was delighted to accept. Upon arrival, enthusiastic and welcoming Alex came around the counter and took my order, chitchatting with me about the menu while I deliberated over the options. Salads, wraps/burritos, “power plates,” smoothies—choices galore! A whole section dedicated to vegetarian options too! It is clear just looking at the menu and its featured ingredients that this is a restaurant dedicated to serving and pleasing a wide array of health-conscious, hungry individuals. Brown rice, egg whites, sweet potatoes—whole grains and lean sources of protein…What could be better?

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Alex told me that his particular favorite is The Mighty Jeff Ross: grilled chicken and brown rice topped with chili beans, low fat mozzarella, and guacamole—apparently one of their best-sellers (and, by the description, I can understand why—simplistic, hearty, and delicious).

I took his input into consideration and went with the South American Burrito (which is pretty similar to The Mighty Jeff Ross with some tweaks here and there)—a whole wheat wrap stuffed with homemade guacamole, romaine, cucumber, tomato, brown rice, grilled chicken, and chili beans. I grinned satisfactorily at my choice as I placed my order and made my way over to a table to (hungrily and eagerly) wait in anticipation.

Eva’s is clearly a hotspot in Greenwich Village. The restaurant’s aura is relaxed and casual in the best way—that is, the opposite of too many NYC cafés that are so trendily hoity-toity that just walking in the doors can induce a crushing self-conscious feeling. Eva’s, on the other hand, is wonderfully warm and inviting.

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Perhaps this is due to the history and authenticity residing within its walls. This February, Eva’s is celebrating its 40th year anniversary—that is, this landmark joint “serving delicious and nutritious food” (with a Mediterranean flair, it seems) has been around since the Spring of 1978. That’s over twice my age…Pretty cool!

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As I waited, Steve (the store manager) wandered over and began chatting with me. I was struck by his kindness and spirited pride in all that is Eva’s. His kindness was contagious as we sat and talked. He told me about his personal favorite on the menu—The Eggs & Tomato: a whole wheat wrap with 5 egg whites, tomato, and cheddar cheese. I’ll have to try it next time.

He explained that the motto of Eva’s Kitchen is: “Eat good, feel good.” Their trademark is healthy food that tastes good and makes you feel good. He even mentioned that they cook with no preservatives. I was thrilled to hear that—it’s hard to find places in the city nowadays that actually care about quality of ingredients and how their food makes their customers feel upon leaving.

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My burrito came very quickly; I was very impressed by the quick service. Steve left me to enjoy my meal—although without first talking up and bringing me their house-made hot sauce (which, he mentioned, is somehow free of salt altogether!). I’m a spicy food lover, so I was very excited to try it—and very pleased with its tangy, flavorful, and subtly smoky flavor. And, of course, it did bring the heat.

The burrito itself was to die for. I wouldn’t typically think to put cucumbers in a burrito, but what a wonderful addition—it adds a pleasant crunch and acts as a nice spice-tamer. When I first saw the size of the burrito, the following thought-process occurred: “There’s no way I’ll be able to eat all that it one sitting. That’s okay though—it’ll make for a great lunch tomorrow.”

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To my surprise, I ate the entire thing—I left absolutely no trace…What can I say, it was really delicious. The chicken was juicy; the guac was flavorful (without being overly salty or, on the other hand, bland); the rice was tender; the veggies were fresh and crisp; and, overall, it left me feeling full, satisfied, and with a smile on my face. I didn’t feel bogged down and greasy like I typically do after eating a burrito. Like Steve told me: “Eat good, feel good!”

Overall, I had a blast visiting Eva’s. Particularly notable was their very fast service; lively and personable staff; extensive menu with something for everyone and anyone (no matter what preferences or dietary restrictions one might have); the constant ebb and flow of colorful customers (it clearly is a hotspot!); and the warm aura altogether.

I left with a full belly, a smiling face, and a piece of carrot cake to-go (thanks again, Steve!). Wholesome seems like a very fitting word to describe both Eva’s ambiance and tasty (yet still healthy!) food. The authenticity defining the years of memories made within, the food served, the friendly staff, and the hungry visitors (be them regulars or newcomers) seems to be what makes Eva’s uniquely…Eva’s. And due to such authenticity, Eva’s undoubtedly stands out as an NYC gem. I cannot wait for my next visit. As an NYU student with this place right around the corner from campus…Watch out Eva’s, I think I just found my new favorite lunch spot!

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*If you’re an NYU Student, make sure to stop by Eva’s and get 10% off The Lazy Hustler (“The #1 Falafel Burrito in NYC”) when you show your student ID!

**More information (and coupons) can be found at: http://www.campusclipper.com/new/coupons.php?REG_COD=1

By Libby King

 


Libby is an NYU student, a Campus Clipper foodie, and a passionate writer and graphic designer. She writes her own blog, libalittle.com, where she strives to share insight, encourage creativity, and stimulate curiosity.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Broadway Discounts Are a Millennial Student’s Best Friend Series Part 2: TKTS Booth at Times Square

January 29th, 2018

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If you have the will to lug yourself out of bed and put on some pants, consider hunting for Broadway deals in the outdoor glittering lights of Times Square. Convince yourself to snap your laptop shut.

In Part 1, I discussed purchasing tickets over TDF online as an introvert. Although I prefer the indoor joys of ordering discount tickets on TDF online, online does not have everything available. I have my eyes peeled for affordable deals on Come From Away and Dear Evan Hansen, but I rarely see them online. If you’re not a fan of paying the TDF membership fee, take a trip to the TKTS booths for same-day discounts.

For simplicity sake, this blog will focus on the main Times Square booth. There are also three other booths at the South Street Seaport, Lincoln Center, and Downtown Brooklyn. But Times Square booth yields the most variety of features.

Pass the costumed Marvel heroes and Disney icons beckoning tourists for photos, the Times Square TKTS booth is located underneath the Glowing Ruby-Red Stairs at 47th Street. It’s easily accessible through the red-1 train line on the 50th street stop.

red stairs

Photo provided by the Theatre Development Fund

Compared to TDF membership purchases, where seating arrangement is a wild card once you pick up your ticket at the box office, TKTS allows you to gauge your seating arrangement at the booth.

Set a free day to go bargain hunting, preferably on a Friday or weekends. In case you don’t find the bargain you want, set up a backup plan, like eating out or seeing a movie or just walking around Times Square.

Set a budget: How much are you willing to spend? Is there a show that’s difficult to access that you’re willing to pay a 20% discount for? (Sorry, no Hamilton but Phantom of the Opera can pop up) Personally, I would aim for 50% deals. But some deals are only 20-30%. I remember getting a $100 offer for the high-demand Once On This Island revival and turning it down.

The Times Square booth hours. 

For Evening Performances:

Monday – Saturday: 3:00pm – 8:00pm

(Tuesday starts at 2:00pm)

Sunday: 3:00pm – 7:00pm

 

For Matinee Performances:

Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday: 10:00am – 2:00pm

Sunday: 11:00am – 3:00pm

 

Downloading the free TKTS app allows you to track shows available at the booth. I wish I could purchase discounts from the app, but that’s not how it works. It will alert you of the show availability, but if you see something you want, it’s up to you to physically purchase it at the booth. So run!

 

The TKTS app

The TKTS app

 

Come early.

Come an hour early because you can expect the line to be already occupied with New Yorkers or tourists with their eyes peeled for discounts.

But if there’s nothing to pique your interests…

Come later.

While I prefer going early to catch the expansive deals, Thoughtco offers this hack: Arrive in line closer to the show time when unsold house seats are released. Lines are said to be shorter and surprises may pop up. So if you came early and find nothing remarkable, take a walk around Times Square and then return perhaps about 30 minutes before the standard show time of 8:00 pm (2:00/3:00 pm on matinee). If you get a desired deal, make a dash to the appropriate theatre that’s playing your show (so have your Google Map ready to ascertain theatre address).

The Times Square booth also has this perk: The TKTS 7-Day Fast Pass. Within 7 days of your TKTS purchase, show your ticket stub, and stroll right up to Window #1, thereby skipping the lines.

For non-musical play viewers: Window #12 is the “Play Only” window. Plays are sold at all windows, but you can go directly to that window for a much shorter wait if you’re not into musicals. (I’ll personally recommend the long-running Play That Goes Wrong.)

To summarize:

Pros: Getting sun, shot at options that aren’t available online, the sense of community being around theatre-goers, getting a FastPass with a ticket stub.

Cons: Long lines, freezing in cold winters, boiling in the hot sun, the anxiety of not getting your desired deal, deals in constant flux.

One last caution: Avoid the scalpers wandering at the line, who will tempt you with fake bargains.

Happy bargain hunting in the sun or snow, preferably the former.

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Sources:


Carol is a queer Vietnamese-Houstonian Earthling surviving under the fickle weather of New York. When she’s not seeing a Broadway production, she’s buried in her nonfiction MFA homework like Hermione Granger and her Hogwarts studies. When not angsting over her first poetry manuscript or a pilot screenplay about space samurais, Carol is cooking her own Chinese food instead of buying take-outs and dreaming of winning Hamilton lotto tickets. She chronicles the quirks of New York living and writing, runs writing and scripting services, and lends her voice to Birth Movies DeathThe Mary SueFilm School Rejectsand The Script Lab. She’s also lurking in the shadows waiting for you to follow her on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Broadway Discounts Are a Millennial Student’s Best Friend Series Part 1: Theatre Development Fund

January 19th, 2018

broadway lights-2

Broadway doesn’t come cheap. If I were a millionaire, my first impulse would be to snag every full-price Broadway ticket.

In the Broadway musical adaptation of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, the showstopper “Great Big Stuff” hurls out this laughter-inducing quip: “I can finally afford to see a Broadway show!”

When I was living in Houston, Texas, I dreamed of faraway land of fantasies and wonder of Hamilton and the Comet of 1812. But they’re too pricey to fly from city just to catch a show. Because current productions aren’t available on DVD or Netflix, they aren’t easy to access.

Now having moved to New York City, I confronted plenty of tricks and trades of bargains. It’s not perfect: There are shows too far out of the reach (Curse you, sold out and overpriced Hamilton tickets!) but a student status and familiarity of deals can assuage your thrifty habits.

In 2014, LA Weekly cited that an average Broadway ticket costs a daunting $100, but truth is, ticket prices are often in flux. That does not account for high-demand productions like Hamilton, Hello Dolly, or Once Upon an Island. As a graduate student, I don’t have my wallet full enough to buy $100 tickets on a whim.

First, ask yourself how much you are willing to spend per month on tickets.

My personal goal: 2-3 shows a month. I aim for about $50 or below for each ticket. I’ll have money left for groceries.

Theatre Development Fund Membership

If you’re a student or recent graduate, you are eligible for membership with the Theatre Development Fund (the TDF).

Prices for Broadway productions are often fixed. As of my 2017-2018 membership, I encountered these prices:

For musicals: $51

For plays: $45-46

Yearly membership fee is $35, which is a fair trade off to access $51 tickets, about 50% of the average ticket price.

(Psssss, I Googled the promo code MetroNY on Retail Me Not, which knocked my first-year membership fee down to $29. If this code had expired by the time you read this, Google around to hunt for an additional code.)

I give fair warning: TDF seat selection is a wild card. Before a purchase, it will warn you whether seating is in mezzanine or balcony, but you will not be informed of the exact seating arrangement once you order your ticket. I can credit it for not shoving me at the far rear or the balcony. Once in a while, I got sweet deal of center orchestra seating for School of Rock or center mezzanine for the Cats revival for a grander scope.

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My scope of the mezzanine view of the Cats revival, courtesy of TDF.

Every so often, I was planted at the far side of mezzanine, but a decently close to the front. At one point for Anastasia, TDF put me on the front-row orchestra. Sounds wonderful but there was this catch: It was the orchestra-left side farthest from the center, an angled neck-straining viewing experience.

I find that TDF discount has more variety of Broadway productions than other sites that offers discounts for $51. Average traditional student discounts of $51 often regulates you to the third-floor balcony seating, which I find to be far enough to deem “riiiiiiip-off.” But TDF’s $51 musical tickets have situated me in orchestra or the second-floor mezzanine and never placed me on the 3rd floor balcony. If you are chancing on a balcony seat, the purchase will warn you beforehand. Long-running and high-demand shows like Phantom of the Opera or Hello Dolly will appear, but don’t expect Wicked, The Lion King, or Hamilton to magically pop up one day (I’m keeping my eyes peeled for those).

Ordering through TDF online is ideal for a shut-in introvert like me. I don’t have to rush to a physical location or wait in line for the suspense of obtaining bargains. I never expect the TDF price to radically hike up. Few times, they have sales for tomorrow’s performances. It’s also great for long-term planning. Depending on the available line-up of show dates, TDF allows me to plan ahead with show-dates. I got my Spongebob Squarepants ticket a few weeks before I saw that nautical delight.

Be prepare to email a photo of your student ID or enrollment form as proof of eligibility at POE@tdf.org within 10 days of starting membership.

Up next: TKTS Booths and other discount methods

Sources:

– https://www.tdf.org/

By Caroline Cao


Carol is a queer Vietnamese-Houstonian Earthling surviving under the fickle weather of New York. When she’s not seeing a Broadway production, she’s buried in her nonfiction MFA homework like Hermione Granger and her Hogwarts studies. When not angsting over her first poetry manuscript or a pilot screenplay about space samurais, Carol is cooking her own Chinese food instead of buying take-outs and dreaming of winning Hamilton lotto tickets. She chronicles the quirks of New York living and writing, runs writing and scripting services, and lends her voice to Birth Movies Death, The Mary SueFilm School Rejectsand The Script Lab. She’s also lurking in the shadows waiting for you to follow her on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram.

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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On Budgeting, Or Money Does Not Grow on Trees

December 28th, 2017
Image Credit:  http://blog.bqe.com/2010/08/08/15-ways-to-use-a-budget/

Image Credit:
http://blog.bqe.com/2010/08/08/15-ways-to-use-a-budget/

Studying in college, you probably often find yourself hunting for various student discounts, special offers and college student deals in order to save money. If your education is not free, it does not take long to end up with a huge student loan, which will burden you upon graduation. I don’t need to tell you how expensive textbooks are nowadays; you buy them every semester, and they do break the bank. If you are not living at home, you need to pay rent and buy groceries, which makes you miss mom’s cooking along with dad’s wallet. Perhaps, this is the first time you are living on your own, and you are overwhelmed.

Don’t be. Instead, learn how to budget. It is a skill that, I promise, will improve your overall life quality – during and after college. Not only will budgeting help you avoid getting into debt, it will also fill you with self-confidence, as you will know for sure how you will pay your bills and will not have to worry about tomorrow, or the day after tomorrow and so on.

1. Determine your monthly income.

How much money, on average, do you have to spend in a month? Take a blank sheet of paper and write down how much you get paid for working, as a stipend or as an allowance from your parents. Since budgeting means creating a long-term plan, do not include any inheritance money or any amount that you do not receive on a regular basis (for example, lottery winnings, birthday gift money, and so on).

If you do not have a stable income – for instance, if you work on commission – I would suggest taking an average amount you make in a month. If in January you make less than that amount, you will have to make up the difference in February or March, but if you make more than that amount in April, put the money aside for when the business is not doing as well. The same rule applies to any sort of irregular income, such as grants, lottery winnings, etc.

2. Calculate your monthly expenses.

This includes rent, utility bills, any school-related expenses (tuition, books, etc.), transportation, health insurance, Internet and cell phone service, and so on. If you pay your tuition once a semester, divide the full amount by the number of months in a semester, or calculate the total for the whole year and divide that by 12. Also, include an average amount you spend per month on food, laundry and other necessary expenses. This is also a good time to think about how you can save money on your expenses. Check newspapers and magazines to see if you can find student coupons or promo codes or move into a cheaper apartment. Ask around. If your classmate uses less expensive cell phone service, look into it. If you learn to be frugal, living on a modest student budget, you will gain a skill that will come handy when you have to save money to buy a house, a car or a yacht – whatever your heart will desire and your wallet can afford.

Image Credit: http://www.hindustantimes.com/union-budget/budget-2017-what-arun-jaitley-can-do-to-make-the-indian-middle-class-smile/story-Dnn3ZzI5rNLNZIY2HMUYfP.html

Image Credit:
http://www.hindustantimes.com/union-budget/budget-2017-what-arun-jaitley-can-do-to-make-the-indian-middle-class-smile/story-Dnn3ZzI5rNLNZIY2HMUYfP.html

3. Compare your income and your expenses.

Ideally, your income should be bigger than the amount you spend on bills, leaving you some room for unplanned expenses, such as a pretty new dress or the newest video game. Note how much money – if any – you have left after you pay all of those expenses. Although you are free to spend any excess bucks on spoiling yourself with food and entertainment, I would suggest opening a savings account and determining an amount you can deposit into it on a monthly basis without starving yourself. Later on, you can use this account for any unplanned expenses or gifts to yourself.

If, however, you spend more than you earn, you should start thinking of ways to increase your income. For example, you can get a part-time job on or off campus, ask your parents to increase your allowance (you can show them your budget and explain why an increase in necessary, and, I am sure, they will be impressed by your newly gained budgeting skills). Just like I mentioned above, you should plan to earn a little bit more than you spend and try to put some money aside for unplanned expenses in case you get sick, need new clothes or want to go out more. Applying for a new credit card would not be a good solution for this problem, as it could add on extra temptations and increase your expenses that your income will not be able to cover.

4. Recalculate your budget as needed.

It would be reasonable to re-budget every time your income and your expenses change significantly. For example, your tuition probably goes up every year, so you need to take that into consideration. Same applies to your roommate moving out, the price of groceries skyrocketing or your parents suddenly deciding you should support yourself.

When you first learn to budget, you can even recalculate your income versus your expenses every month, or even on a weekly basis. This will depend on how often you get paid. If your parents send you money once a month, you will have to plan on living off that money for the whole month.

By Ekaterina Lalo


Ekaterina Lalo is the Campus Clipper’s guest blogger. Ekaterina regularly blogged for the Campus Clipper in 2011 and participated in the making of the Campus Clipper’s NYC Student Guide. She is currently working as an Editorial Manager at Phantom Communications, but she is still passionate about writing for students. 

For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings and watch our YouTube video showing off some of New York City’s finest students during the Welcome Week of 2015.

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Philautia

November 11th, 2017
Courtesy: Sublime360

Courtesy: Sublime360

I have often been told that I don’t love myself enough to walk away from things that generate negativity: things meaning people – people mostly harmful to my mental health. Seldom do advisors forget the phrase, “Love yourself.” But how does one love herself when she is repeatedly being told to love others and be respectful of them as soon as she walks on two feet instead of four. Her first teenage heartbreak and she suddenly hears the phrase, “fall in love with yourself first,” the same one in different voices.

Falling in love with oneself isn’t easy. You know your own flaws and imperfections and to give a damaged human being that kind of unconditional love requires a lot of patience and dedication; it requires trust.

We often don’t trust ourselves with a lot of things. I don’t trust that I can ever get an A in my statistics class. I think I am incapable of achieving that score. And if I think I am incapable, I will never be capable. I don’t necessarily trust myself to be the most satisfied human being and hence I will simply never be one.

There is no hard learned formula for falling in love, sometimes you might not even realize but you may have fallen head over heels with someone already. But falling in love with yourself requires a guidebook; a guidebook with one simple rule that quite bluntly states, “In order to love yourself, you must behave in ways that you admire (Irving Yalom).”

Courtesy: Tiny Buddha

Courtesy: Tiny Buddha

 

 

Everyone visualises an ideal self and the closer you are to your ideal self, the more likely you are to appreciate yourself. My ideal self is an extremely selfless human being: a 10 on a scale of 1 to 10 but I might only be 7 as of yet. And in order for me to love myself in the purest form, I have to strive to be the 10.

Everywhere everyone around you is searching for this ideal self, not in themselves but in others. Often when we don’t love ourselves enough, we go looking for someone else to love us and show us our best selves. Often we come across people hoping they would fill up the void in our lives. And this very void that we are so desperate to fill, makes us feel vulnerable and naked.

Love for me is beyond any measure of lust or beauty. Love is what comforts you just by the thought of it. There is love in friendship and there is love in honesty. However, the brutality of love is that it ruins you. But philautia (self love) unlike any other kind of love, always uplifts you.

I have loved and lost. And I feel so scared that I’m never going to feel that way again. I am relentlessly looking for love while I’m also subconsciously waiting for it to knock on my door as a surprise.

But instead of waiting in distress, it is time I provide myself with what I am desperately searching for.

As college students we almost always fall prey to conversations that involve friends almost always talking about the people they are dating. You suddenly become the “other” when you feel alienated. You suddenly become the “other” when everyone around you is either falling in or out of love. The college environment exerts a certain pressure on you where you feel compelled to give in to what everyone else seems to be doing. If anything, you resort to Tinder or Bumble.

So stop dating that guy who abused you. Stop looking for love on websites where commitment phobics look for hook up buddies. Stop hanging around with someone who makes you his side chick.

Identify the things you love about him. List it on a sticky note. Hang it on your mirror. This will remind you that these are the qualities you adore. These are the things that you should train yourself to excel in.

When you stop looking for them in others, you will start looking for them inside you. There is no harm in being old school and waiting for love to come to you instead of trying to find it at a bar or club. Halt. Don’t rush.

We have a long way to go, many paths of life are yet to be discovered so live on with the hope of every path taking you to a better destination each time. We have big dreams, big enough to scare us. But only with belief and trust, will these dreams become realities.

 

By Sushmita Roy

Sushmita Roy is a Campus Clipper intern and a junior at NYU majoring in Journalism and Psychology. Her research interests includes immigration, human interest stories and social psychology. When she’s not studying, Sushmita enjoys catching up with friends, binge watching TV shows and cooking for anyone and everyone. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC, from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books; we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings. 

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Philia

October 23rd, 2017
Courtesy: Independent

Courtesy: Independent

“I prayed for the city to be cleared of people, for the gift of being alone,  a-l-o-n-e: which is the one New Yorker prayer that rarely gets lost or delayed in channels, and in no time at all, everything I touched turned to solid loneliness.” J.D. Salinger

New York can be though on you but NYU could be a lot tougher. If you come from anywhere around Asia or the countryside, you would know that nosy neighbors are bats that gained bad reputation arising from the folklore that ties them to vampires and Dracula. In terms of usefulness, bats are prime agents of pollination and seed dispersal. Often devalued, most bats are not blood sucking creatures but a friend to the mankind: killing insects those of whom are threats.

Nosy neighbours are skilled at dispersing gossip. But drifting away from the reputation of gossipy housewives in their mid-forties, neighbors drop your kids, bring you food, help you when you are locked out or when you run out of sugar.

In New York, you don’t speak to your neighbors, it’s an unspoken ground rule that everyone seems to abide by. You don’t greet them. You don’t know them. It isn’t uncommon to live in your dorm room without speaking to your suite mates for days.

Elevators give you stress and phones without signals are awkward getaways. More than anywhere in the world, New York is where you most need a friend.

My classmate, Aerin Reed comes from a small town known as Eastern Connecticut where the only revolutionary thing that has happened in the last few years is the renovation of the Eastern Village Store. Moms and gossips and hitting deer accidentally are as much a part of her childhood vicinity as are bagels, frowns and subway horrors in New York.

“My town has a thousand people more than NYU’s graduating class,” Reed said while describing her transition from a traditional small town to the city that is overly crowded even on Sundays.

Unlike her friends and classmates, Reed never dreamed of studying in a traditional campus setting, which made NYU one of her first choices. “I remember walking down the road after welcome week and thinking I do not know anyone on the street,” quite unlike the million recognizable faces she would encounter while driving a car in the part of the world which she calls “home.”

At this exact moment what she would have missed is a friend. At this exact moment she needed the kind of love Greeks call “philia.”

Philia was first used by the Greek philosopher Aristotle, who defined it as brotherly love or love shared by friends. The English language does not have a separate word for what Aristotle believed to be unconditional and pure i.e. “with good reason,” so we shall do what we always do: follow the path lead by Greeks.

New York Times columnist Frank Bruni recently wrote a column titled, “The Real Campus Scourge,” which discusses the overwhelming theme of loneliness in a campus setting. “In a survey of nearly 28,000 students on 51 campuses by the American College Health Association last year, more than 60 percent said that they had “felt very lonely” in the previous 12 months. Nearly 30 percent said that they had felt that way in the previous two weeks,” he wrote. All these folks deprived of Philia.

In New York, everything is always on the extreme as is this feeling of loneliness. No amount of Rainbow themed Starbucks or insta worthy cookie doughs can fill the void that only friendship can fill. But my dearest, you are not alone in this. New York has that power over you but you have something that the city lacks: the option to halt, start over and rebuild.

Text your freshman year roommate.

Don’t let Netflix govern your life.

Talk to the person sitting right next to you, chances are she feels the same way.

Log off Instagram.

Remember, loneliness is a feeling that is temporary. It is not a lifestyle.

Don’t just make acquaintances. Get to know them. Turn them into your friends.

Most of all, remember to let go of whatever is holding you back: fear, shyness, insecurity, rationale, over possessive boyfriend and then you will learn to live. You need a friend and so does the person next to you. All you have to do is smile.

By Sushmita Roy

Sushmita Roy is a Campus Clipper intern and a junior at NYU majoring in Journalism and Psychology. Her research interests includes immigration, human interest stories and social psychology. When she’s not studying, Sushmita enjoys catching up with friends, binge watching TV shows and cooking for anyone and everyone. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC, from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books; we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings. 

 

 

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Between Theory and Practice

October 12th, 2017

As a student, I’ve always enjoyed reading and dissecting theory. Abstract concepts of power, race, and gender always interested me, and I enjoy coming up with creative interpretations of their inter-relationships.

But talking isn’t enough. To enact social change, I must be willing to practice theory on the ground. So I’ve tried to get moving, to put what I’ve read about into action. As years of messy practice have shown, practical application is much more difficult than mere theory. I make mistakes, I feel uncomfortable, and I often just want to retreat back into theory.

I’ve developed a metaphor for my attempts to pursue social justice. Theory is like English- it’s my native language, it’s familiar, and it’s much easier for me to implement. On the other hand, practice is like Spanish. I learned it later in life, and because the sounds and words did not embed themselves in my brain as a child, they come much more slowly to mind. I will never be fully fluent, nor as confident in Spanish.

But Spanish (and practice) are a necessary component of social justice work. They stretch my mind, add to my vocabulary, and guarantee that I am not too comfortable. They remind me of my limits, and open up larger segments of the population to me. I’m able to meet people where they are, to speak their language rather than forcing them to speak mine. It’s a small way I try to right the very unequal power dynamics between Spanish and English speakers. When non-native speakers make mistakes in English, they are looked down upon, derided. But when I speak Spanish, even though I’m far from fluent, I am complimented. My attempts are praised, and my learning Spanish is seen as going the extra mile, while speaking perfect English is considered a requisite for anyone living in the United States.

Of course, pursuing justice is a lofty goal. Those who attempt to bring about justice either get overwhelmed by the impossible task, or become consumed by their own accomplishments. It’s hard to strike a balance between giving up and becoming prideful. Even though I can’t save the world, I need to at least try to ensure to mitigate the negative effects I evoke by doing nothing. Just by being on this planet, I am creating a carbon footprint. By living my relatively privileged life, I am abetting systems that perpetuate racism. By seeking my own satisfaction, I am depriving others of resources. To counter these realities, the best I can hope to do is to impact one little corner of the world as best I can.

Audre Lorde, a Black Lesbian Feminist scholar, emphasizes the potential positive uses for anger. She writes, “Anger expressed and translated into action in the service of our vision and our future is a liberating and strengthening act of clarification” (Sister Outsider, 127). For people of color, anger is often their only weapon against the oppression they experience daily.
Whether through speaking Spanish, pursuing action, or expressing anger, practical implementation is the enactment of true commitment to social justice.

By Anna Lindner


Anna is a Campus Clipper intern and a first-year Master’s student in NYU’s Media, Culture, and Communication program. Her research interests include critical race and gender theory and their resultant intersectionality. When she’s not studying, Anna enjoys visiting friends, catching up on TV shows, and lifting weights. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC, from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing and services.

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books; we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings. 

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What is Wanderlust and How Can I Cure It?

October 10th, 2017

When you think of the word “travel,” most people think of going to a faraway place by catching a bus, train, plane, or driving for hours outside of town. They are overwhelmed by the thought of saving money, clipping coupons, and living off of ramen just to see a new concrete jungle. However, once they come back, they are suddenly overcome by the “travel bug,” otherwise known as wanderlust. But can wanderlust only be fulfilled by going away? Is there a way to satisfy this craving for adventure without leaving the confines of your own town? I would argue that you can.

The definition of wanderlust by the Merriam-Wester Dictionary site is a “strong longing for or impulse toward wandering.” What this definition doesn’t capture is paired illusion of feeling stuck where you are, both in your location and in your routine.

https://burst.shopify.com/photos/city-woman-exercising-outdoors

https://burst.shopify.com/photos/city-woman-exercising-outdoors

When I came back home from studying abroad in South Korea for a semester, I almost immediately felt trapped. Suddenly access transportation was slow, I couldn’t make it to the other side of the country without a lot of money or even more time, and the burden of a new, rigorous quarter at school made it impossible for me to mimic the freedom I had almost 7,000 miles away from home. “Wanderlust” had become a prison that no one warned me about in the pre-departure presentation months before.

One thing I’ve learned in my time in college is when life gives you lemons, you don’t just make lemonade; you make lemon tarts.

There are three options you have when it comes to handling wanderlust. One is simply ignoring it, which is kind of like eating the lemons. The second, the lemonade, is taking a vacation during a break and exploring as much as possible. My favorite option is the third: adopting the explorer’s mindset, and turning everyday life into an adventure. Lemon. Tarts.

https://flic.kr/p/cwd1Q9

https://flic.kr/p/cwd1Q9

What do people do when they travel? It’s not all about the Statue of Liberty, the Space Needle, the Reading Terminal Market, or Time Square. People look for new experiences that they don’t normally have in their day-to-day routine. By acquiring the explorer’s mindset, that there is an adventure hiding everywhere, you can work on your wanderlust every day. Take a new route to class, check out new restaurants, or go on a date in a new neighborhood. You don’t have to become a tourist to shake up the monotony.

Humans are resistant to change, and I’m completely guilty of this. My first few months home were just me stuck in my old routine before traveling to Korea. But one day I decided to visit a friend in a neighborhood I had never been to. Then I went to another part of the city for happy hour with my best friend from middle school. And yes, I did make a couple of bus trips to nearby cities during long weekends over the summer. As time went on, I found that the bugging wanderlust that had cornered me was getting what it wanted.

I’m not saying that you don’t need a big trip to Europe or a backpacking road trip across Southeast Asia. At some point, you will want more than whatever you’re doing. If watching videos on YouTube is like a bandage, scaling your hometown is a painkiller, then that big trip abroad is the trip to the doctor’s office.

I hate to say this, but wanderlust is completely incurable. In my travels, I’ve met people who have explored the world and still feel that pang to keep moving. The best strategy to keep wanderlust at bay is to constantly challenge yourself to see new places, experience new things, and maintain your thirst for knowledge. And maybe bake a tray of lemon tarts.

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By Jada Gossett

Jada is a Campus Clipper publishing intern who is majoring in Psychology and working on a Certificate in Creative Writing and Publishing at Drexel University. After traveling to South Korea for study abroad in the Fall of 2016, she has undertaken a new side venture as a lifestyle blogger determined to get college students to get out of their comfort zone. If you like her posts, you can find more of her work here or follow her on Twitter or Instagram. For over 20 years, the Campus Clipper has been offering awesome student discounts in NYC,  from the East Side to Greenwich Village. Along with inspiration, the company offers students a special coupon booklet and the Official Student Guide, which encourage them to discover new places in the city and save money on food, clothing, and services.  

At the Campus Clipper, not only do we help our interns learn new skills, make money, and create wonderful e-books, we give them a platform to teach others. Check our website for more student savings.

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